Sugar bananas

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Anonymous

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Just extended the pipe that takes the shower water to the ribbon fan palm I planted to shade the last part of the wall exposed to the western sun. Took another sucker off the sugar banana, bunged it at the end of the pipe. The mother plant is yet to fruit but it's growth rate is phenomonal. It just keeps pumping out sucker after sucker, even though it has been getting fairly minimal water. Abassyinian bananas don't bear edible fruit but develop an enormous edible corm of up to 40kg which has saved the lives of many drought-affected Ethiopian villagers. I'll bet other banana species have a similar water and food storage facility - I have been surprised at how much this thing has thrived throughout this severe drought.

Sugar bananas - yum. They'll help shade that wall as well.
 

jovialmo

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Was in brisbane visiting a friend, he made a fruit salad. All lovely local produce, mangos, pineapple, ladyfinger bananas. . .better then we can do here with fruit picked unripe and shipped 2000 miles
 
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Anonymous

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annielaurie said:
Good bananas, Lefteee! Can I have some? Neat!

I'll post you some over Annie :lol:

I think you would be able to grow bananas in southern California as long as the area is frost free.

Botanical trivia (I'm a little bit of an amateur botany freak): in the jungle in the far north of my state, there grows a self-peeling banana! I have actually seen them - as soon as the fruit is ripe, it actually peels itself while still attatched to the plant. Unfortunately, it is so full of seeds it isn't really worth eating.
 
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HBS Guy said:
Was in brisbane visiting a friend, he made a fruit salad. All lovely local produce, mangos, pineapple, ladyfinger bananas. . .better then we can do here with fruit picked unripe and shipped 2000 miles
Yep, have mangos, longans and custard apples all fruiting at the moment. How many fruit I will actually get if it doesn't rain soon is yet to be seen. And the rose apples are fruiting again.

For Annie: rose apples are a species of Syzigium (related to gum trees, surprisingly), native to northern Australia/ south-east Asia. The tree that supplies the spice we call cloves is a close relative. The golf ball-sized fruit of the rose apple is very sweet and tastes like the perfume of roses. It also fills the garden with the scent of roses as the fruit ripen. I can only eat one or two in one sitting as they get too sweet for me, but they are good chopped up and sprinkled through fruit salad.
 
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