So...what animal is gonna kill you in Australia?

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
pinkeye said:
SethBullock said:
HBS Guy said:
ahahaha have a search on feral cats in Australia. It REALLY makes me glad there is no gigantism gene in the domestic cat!

Nobody should be able to buy an unneutered cat IMHO. That will dry up the replacement of the feral cat population.

Rabbits
Cats
Camels
Pigs
Goats
Cane toads
Foxes
The English

None should EVER have been imported here!
One would think that the feral cats would wipe out the rabbits, not to mention the dingoes.
Yes but you see they are spread across huge areas, and the feral cats don't tend to encroach on the dingos, and vice versa.
Those on the list , apart from those bloody American TOADS that got invited in, have preferred areas of habitat and range.

Don't forget to add Asian Buffalo.


It would sound logical that dingos 'd kill cats, etc. But too bad it doesn't work that way. Dingos can gorge on rabbits and make no difference.

The whole of arid Australia is at huge risk from these relatively recently introduced species. It is the rule of unintended consequences.
Maybe you guys could use a coyote population. They would knock down the numbers of rabbits and feral cats. Trouble is, they might also harm your native species.
 

Texan

Active member
https://www.dallasnews.com/news/animals/2018/11/28/aggressive-coyote-attacks-jogger-child-frisco

Coyotes are attacking joggers in DFW. Just about 10-12 years ago our governor shot a coyote that was stalking his leashed dog.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Texan said:
https://www.dallasnews.com/news/animals/2018/11/28/aggressive-coyote-attacks-jogger-child-frisco

Coyotes are attacking joggers in DFW. Just about 10-12 years ago our governor shot a coyote that was stalking his leashed dog.
Usually coyotes avoid contact with humans. But they are smart animals, and if problem animals aren't hunted, they have been known to lose their fear of humans. You live out in the country, don't you? Do you ever hear or see coyotes? I hear them frequently, and every so often I'll see one cross the road or in a farmers field while I'm driving on my way to work. I know a lady who lives out in the country. She loves animals and owns no guns. Very soft-hearted, nice lady. No hunting or shooting was allowed on her property. But the coyotes were thinking of her little dogs as food, and one time one was in her driveway when she drove home and was growling and refused to leave. She finally asked my son to come over. He and his friend used a coyote call and quickly killed 3 of them. Problem over. If a few are killed by humans, the others learn quickly. What's going on in DFW? Libs taking over? Coyotes should not ordinarily be a threat to humans.
 

sherri

New member
SethBullock said:
sherri said:
Good grief, what's that thing?
We'll need to add it to the list.

Bet you don't get many hikers in Oregon. or not as many as there... used to be, put it that way.
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.
Cougars, coyotes, big bears. :OMG
Unable to take a bush walk if you haven't got arms.

And Americans think Australia is a dangerous place?

I rest my case. :bgrin
 

Sprintcyclist

Active member
it might be a tree .........
MARINA HURLEY’S DEDICATION to science was sorely tested during the three years she spent in Queensland’s Atherton Tableland studying stinging trees. The entomologist and ecologist’s first encounter with the Gympie-Gympie stinging tree produced a sneezing fit and left her eyes and nose running for hours. Even protective particle masks and welding gloves could not spare her several subsequent stings – one requiring hospitalisation – but that was nothing compared with the severe allergy she developed.

“Being stung is the worst kind of pain you can imagine – like being burnt with hot acid and electrocuted at the same time,” said Marina, who at the time was a postgraduate student at James Cook University investigating the herbivores that eat stinging trees.

“The allergic reaction developed over time, causing extreme itching and huge hives that eventually required steroid treatment. At that point my doctor advised that I should have no further contact with the plant and I didn’t object.”

Marina is not alone in her allergic reaction to this innocent-looking plant – one of six stinging-tree species found in Australia, and one of the most poisonous plants here – or her dramatic accounts.

Proliferating in rainforest clearings, along creek-lines and small tracks, the Gympie-Gympie stinging tree (Dendrocnide excelsa) has long been a hazard for foresters, surveyors and timber workers – some of whom are today supplied with respirators, thick gloves and anti-histamine tablets as a precaution. More recently, the hairs covering the plant’s stems, leaves and fruits have also posed a danger to scientists and bushwalkers.

Gympie-Gympie stinging tree history
North Queensland road surveyor A.C. Macmillan was among the first to document the effects of a stinging tree, reporting to his boss in 1866 that his packhorse “was stung, got mad, and died within two hours”. Similar tales abound in local folklore of horses jumping in agony off cliffs and forestry workers drinking themselves silly to dull the intractable pain.

Writing to Marina in 1994, Australian ex-serviceman Cyril Bromley described falling into a stinging tree during military training on the tableland in World War II. Strapped to a hospital bed for three weeks and administered all manner of unsuccessful treatments, he was sent “as mad as a cut snake” by the pain. Cyril also told of an officer shooting himself after using a stinging-tree leaf for “toilet purposes”.

He’s had too many stings to count but Ernie Rider will never forget the day in 1963 that he was slapped in the face, arms and chest by a stinging tree. “I remember it feeling like there were giant hands trying to squash my chest,” he said. “For two or three days the pain was almost unbearable; I couldn’t work or sleep, then it was pretty bad pain for another fortnight or so. The stinging persisted for two years and recurred every time I had a cold shower.”

Now a senior conservation officer with the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, Ernie said he’s not experienced anything like the pain during 44 years work in the bush. “There’s nothing to rival it; it’s 10 times worse than anything else – scrub ticks, scrub itch and itchy-jack sting included. Stinging trees are a real and present danger.”


“I think I went into anaphylactic shock and it took days for my sight to recover,” said Les, a scientific officer with the CSIRO Division of Wildlife and Ecology in Queensland, who was near Bartle Frere (North Peak) studying cassowaries when disaster struck.

“Within minutes the initial stinging and burning intensified and the pain in my eyes was like someone had poured acid on them. My mouth and tongue swelled up so much that I had trouble breathing. It was debilitating and I had to blunder my way out of the bush.”

It was perhaps this rapid and savage reaction that inspired the British Army’s interest in the more sinister applications of the Gympie-Gympie stinging tree in 1968. That year, the Chemical Defence Establishment at Porton Down (a top-secret laboratory that developed chemical weapons) contracted Alan Seawright, then a Professor of Pathology at the University of Queensland, to dispatch stinging-tree specimens.

“Chemical warfare is their work, so I could only assume that they were investigating its potential as a biological weapon,” said Alan, now an honorary research consultant to the University of Queensland’s National Research Centre in Environmental Toxicology. “I never heard anything more, so I guess we’ll never know.”
https://www.australiangeographic.co.../06/gympie-gympie-once-stung-never-forgotten/




......................... The Cape Tribulation Tropical Research Station has treated many people for Gympie-Gympie stings.

Hugh says that if you’re stung, the most important thing is that you do not rub the area, as this can break off the hairs and make them very difficult to remove. He says applying diluted hydrochloric acid (1:10 by volume) to neutralise the hair’s peptide coating, followed by waxing strips to remove the stinging hairs should provide relief within around one and a half hours. While you may be you would be “miserable as hell” once stung, says Hugh, treatment with the acid/hair strip approach should reduce the severity and duration of the pain. ..........................

https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/science-environment/2014/02/factsheet-gympie-gympie/
 

Sprintcyclist

Active member
SethBullock said:
sherri said:
Good grief, what's that thing?
We'll need to add it to the list.

Bet you don't get many hikers in Oregon. or not as many as there... used to be, put it that way.
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.

Great piccie Seth
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
sherri said:
Good grief, what's that thing?
We'll need to add it to the list.

Bet you don't get many hikers in Oregon. or not as many as there... used to be, put it that way.
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.

Great piccie Seth
Yeah, it's an awesome pic my friend got. Can you believe the size of that cat? That thing is friggin awesome!

Males can weigh up to 220 lbs (100 kg), and I would say that cougar is all of that.

He's a beautiful beast, but he is also the reason why you don't go camping or hiking unarmed.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
sherri said:
SethBullock said:
sherri said:
Good grief, what's that thing?
We'll need to add it to the list.

Bet you don't get many hikers in Oregon. or not as many as there... used to be, put it that way.
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.
Cougars, coyotes, big bears. :OMG
Unable to take a bush walk if you haven't got arms.

And Americans think Australia is a dangerous place?

I rest my case. :bgrin
Hey, when you're in their neighborhood, you are not the top predator except with arms. Without arms, you're prey.
 

Sprintcyclist

Active member
SethBullock said:
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
sherri said:
Good grief, what's that thing?
We'll need to add it to the list.

Bet you don't get many hikers in Oregon. or not as many as there... used to be, put it that way.
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.

Great piccie Seth
Yeah, it's an awesome pic my friend got. Can you believe the size of that cat? That thing is friggin awesome!

Males can weigh up to 220 lbs (100 kg), and I would say that cougar is all of that.

He's a beautiful beast, but he is also the reason why you don't go camping or hiking unarmed.
Felines are amazing. Graceful, lazy, kill for fun, 4 razor blades in either hand and foot ........

Feral cats over here are a serious hazard.
A cat that size ......... yikes,
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
sherri said:
SethBullock said:
sherri said:
Good grief, what's that thing?
We'll need to add it to the list.

Bet you don't get many hikers in Oregon. or not as many as there... used to be, put it that way.
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.
Cougars, coyotes, big bears. :OMG
Unable to take a bush walk if you haven't got arms.

And Americans think Australia is a dangerous place?

I rest my case. :bgrin
You've got plenty of dangerous animals - deadly snakes, man-eating sharks and crocs, poisonous spiders. Hell, even toads!

Somehow, horses and cows kill you guys. :WTF

I rest my case. :bgrin back atcha!
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
sherri said:
Good grief, what's that thing?
We'll need to add it to the list.

Bet you don't get many hikers in Oregon. or not as many as there... used to be, put it that way.
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.

Great piccie Seth
Yeah, it's an awesome pic my friend got. Can you believe the size of that cat? That thing is friggin awesome!

Males can weigh up to 220 lbs (100 kg), and I would say that cougar is all of that.

He's a beautiful beast, but he is also the reason why you don't go camping or hiking unarmed.
Felines are amazing. Graceful, lazy, kill for fun, 4 razor blades in either hand and foot ........

Feral cats over here are a serious hazard.
A cat that size ......... yikes,
Yes, they are beautiful, top tier predators.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
well it does seem,( well at least it used to be, haven't checked lately) that horses kill more people than any other creature ( discounting humans of course :roll ).
Although the sharks are starting to catch up... and someone died from a snake bite the other day.. most unusual. Too far from help.. Tiger Snake.
 

Lols

Active member
Topic of snakes! Co-incidentally, daughter had a modelling photo shoot in Brisbane recently, I have blurred out face, and photographer logo for privacy, but howz this for a snake slithering and curling up around your body for a photo shoot! Daughter says she hid her nervousness well. I did handle a snake once, at a field day, interesting, but I knew it was okay, and not venemous, otherwise, I'm outta there!

 

Sprintcyclist

Active member
SethBullock said:
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
sherri said:
Good grief, what's that thing?
We'll need to add it to the list.

Bet you don't get many hikers in Oregon. or not as many as there... used to be, put it that way.
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.

Great piccie Seth
Yeah, it's an awesome pic my friend got. Can you believe the size of that cat? That thing is friggin awesome!

Males can weigh up to 220 lbs (100 kg), and I would say that cougar is all of that.

He's a beautiful beast, but he is also the reason why you don't go camping or hiking unarmed.
Felines are amazing. Graceful, lazy, kill for fun, 4 razor blades in either hand and foot ........

Feral cats over here are a serious hazard.
A cat that size ......... yikes,
Yes, they are beautiful, top tier predators.
One swipe of one of its paws and I would be in big trouble.
Can't outrun it, can't outclimb it ....... do these cats swim ?
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
Sprintcyclist said:
SethBullock said:
It's a cougar, Sherri. Recently an unarmed woman was hiking alone along a trail near Mt Hood and was killed by a cougar. Cougar attacks on humans are rare, but they do happen from time to time. It is much more common to be stalked, but not attacked, by cougar though. Hunters become aware of it rather often. They often find cougar tracks over their own tracks when returning from a hunt. It is unwise to go hiking alone or unarmed.

A friend of mine hunts elk. Before the season opened, he was spending some time scouting the elk. He came across a fresh killed elk. It was a full grown cow elk which is a big animal. So he attached a game camera to a tree aimed at the dead elk and came back the next day. This is what the camera captured. Now to get some idea how big this cougar was, that is a full grown cow elk in the foreground. That cougar had to be a male over 200 lbs.

Great piccie Seth
Yeah, it's an awesome pic my friend got. Can you believe the size of that cat? That thing is friggin awesome!

Males can weigh up to 220 lbs (100 kg), and I would say that cougar is all of that.

He's a beautiful beast, but he is also the reason why you don't go camping or hiking unarmed.
Felines are amazing. Graceful, lazy, kill for fun, 4 razor blades in either hand and foot ........

Feral cats over here are a serious hazard.
A cat that size ......... yikes,
Yes, they are beautiful, top tier predators.
One swipe of one of its paws and I would be in big trouble.
Can't outrun it, can't outclimb it ....... do these cats swim ?
You'd better swim fast ... and don't get tired.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ycxSFVh5nQ[/youtube]

Scary video here. The owner of the video doesn't allow it to show on other sites, but the link is below. This looks to me like an average sized cougar, perhaps around 150 lb, maybe less. He is not like the brute captured on film by my friend's game camera. I can read this cat's mind. He's trying to decide if he can take this human down and eat him, but he's not sure. So he just keeps stalking and watching and assessing his chances, and finally decides against it. Probably the worst thing this guy could have done would have been to turn and run.

Again, this guy should not have been out there without a firearm. I have no desire to kill a cougar. I think they're magnificent animals. If it were me, I would just fire a shot away from him, and I am confident it would take off and not come back.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4FbHzeCJjM
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Lols said:
Topic of snakes! Co-incidentally, daughter had a modelling photo shoot in Brisbane recently, I have blurred out face, and photographer logo for privacy, but howz this for a snake slithering and curling up around your body for a photo shoot! Daughter says she hid her nervousness well. I did handle a snake once, at a field day, interesting, but I knew it was okay, and not venemous, otherwise, I'm outta there!

Blurred face or not, I'm sure she's a very pretty young lady.

I see snakes from time to time when I'm hunting or fishing. I only have to worry if they're rattlesnakes. Otherwise, they don't bother me at all.

You've got some badass snakes in Australia, that's for sure.
 

Lols

Active member
Thanks Seth, she is very attractive, and a lot of males would like to court her, but she has been just doing her own thing and avoiding the dating scene (much to my dismay), for a bout 4 years, since she has had a couple of bad experiences with her past boyfriends, and ended up in court, one became an f-wit stalker, tried to get him to court, but it just never happened, maybe because his step dad is a copper? And maybe because he is an ex-sniper in the army and must have a few firearms? If he ended up in court, he would have lost those firearms a copper friend told us.

So we let it go, but the next one was very disappointing, thought he would be okay, being a security and wanting to get into the police force, I did say to daughter, you need to get to know them, it takes a few months, and this one, I said, my first instinct was, "He seems to be hiding something"....well, he was. Bad drug situation when he was a teen.....he was 15, and his best mate's lil sister said to him "I like you"...then within a couple of days, she was accidentally killed by a bus on the road. Both those boys were grieved to the max and didn't care if they died and went so into drugs.

So that's where, the story doesn't end, they did grow up, and I think, he bacame very bi-polar, I only ever saw his nice side, but felt something else was behind that.
I was right, it must have been some disagreement they had, as he pulled a gun out on daughter one night, she cried and told me she thought she was going to die that night.

We went to Magistrate court, but for some reason, (maybe Aussie knows more than me).....they took him aside, not going through the court, and gave him a warning, knowing he was a security guard with a gun etc (or else he loses his job and gun?).
Since all that, I think she feels she just picks the wrong guys, but my son says, his generation are f...cked with drugs and hard to find someone that isn't into drinking, or smoking, or drugs.

Both my kids are not into any of that, and are both super fit, as we always supported them in sports and interests.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Lols said:
Thanks Seth, she is very attractive,
She is her mother's daughter, after all ... :bgrin
Lols said:
and a lot of males would like to court her, but she has been just doing her own thing and avoiding the dating scene (much to my dismay), for a bout 4 years, since she has had a couple of bad experiences with her past boyfriends, and ended up in court, one became an f-wit stalker, tried to get him to court, but it just never happened, maybe because his step dad is a copper? And maybe because he is an ex-sniper in the army and must have a few firearms? If he ended up in court, he would have lost those firearms a copper friend told us.

So we let it go, but the next one was very disappointing, thought he would be okay, being a security and wanting to get into the police force, I did say to daughter, you need to get to know them, it takes a few months, and this one, I said, my first instinct was, "He seems to be hiding something"....well, he was. Bad drug situation when he was a teen.....he was 15, and his best mate's lil sister said to him "I like you"...then within a couple of days, she was accidentally killed by a bus on the road. Both those boys were grieved to the max and didn't care if they died and went so into drugs.

So that's where, the story doesn't end, they did grow up, and I think, he bacame very bi-polar, I only ever saw his nice side, but felt something else was behind that.
I was right, it must have been some disagreement they had, as he pulled a gun out on daughter one night, she cried and told me she thought she was going to die that night.

We went to Magistrate court, but for some reason, (maybe Aussie knows more than me).....they took him aside, not going through the court, and gave him a warning, knowing he was a security guard with a gun etc (or else he loses his job and gun?).
Since all that, I think she feels she just picks the wrong guys, but my son says, his generation are f...cked with drugs and hard to find someone that isn't into drinking, or smoking, or drugs.

Both my kids are not into any of that, and are both super fit, as we always supported them in sports and interests.
My daughter is 29, very attractive, no kids, no divorces. But my wife and I say her picker is broken. She cannot pick a decent boyfriend. They have all been disasters. Plain as the nose on your face to us, but not to her.

*sigh*
 

Sprintcyclist

Active member
.............. [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ycxSFVh5nQ[/youtube]

Scary video here. The owner of the video doesn't allow it to show on other sites, but the link is below. This looks to me like an average sized cougar, perhaps around 150 lb, maybe less. He is not like the brute captured on film by my friend's game camera. I can read this cat's mind. He's trying to decide if he can take this human down and eat him, but he's not sure. So he just keeps stalking and watching and assessing his chances, and finally decides against it. Probably the worst thing this guy could have done would have been to turn and run.

Again, this guy should not have been out there without a firearm. I have no desire to kill a cougar. I think they're magnificent animals. If it were me, I would just fire a shot away from him, and I am confident it would take off and not come back.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4FbHzeCJjM
had a feeling they were ok with swimming.
Generally running away from a predator does not work.

Perhaps the waves of fear coming from me would sweep them away ?
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Sprintcyclist said:
.............. [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ycxSFVh5nQ[/youtube]

Scary video here. The owner of the video doesn't allow it to show on other sites, but the link is below. This looks to me like an average sized cougar, perhaps around 150 lb, maybe less. He is not like the brute captured on film by my friend's game camera. I can read this cat's mind. He's trying to decide if he can take this human down and eat him, but he's not sure. So he just keeps stalking and watching and assessing his chances, and finally decides against it. Probably the worst thing this guy could have done would have been to turn and run.

Again, this guy should not have been out there without a firearm. I have no desire to kill a cougar. I think they're magnificent animals. If it were me, I would just fire a shot away from him, and I am confident it would take off and not come back.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4FbHzeCJjM
had a feeling they were ok with swimming.
Generally running away from a predator does not work.

Perhaps the waves of fear coming from me would sweep them away ?
Lol ...
 
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