Pregnant Covidiot

greggerypeccary

Active member
She seems to be remorseful, and has admitted to having a "bimbo moment".

“I've seen the footage, and you know, in my assessment, the members have conducted themselves entirely reasonably,” Mr Cornelius said.

“They have been polite, they have been professional, when the individual indicated she may be late for an appointment at the hospital, our members actually contacted the hospital and made arrangements for an alternative appointment. Our members did everything they could to both secure their safety and the safety of the people involved.

“The point really I want to make is that, while this deadly virus doesn't discriminate, we won't discriminate. And we can't discriminate in holding people to account.”

Despite the footage of her arrest being slammed on social media, Ms Buhler said all the police involved were actually “quite nice” which “wasn’t on camera”.

They took the handcuffs off and let me get dressed and they were nice down at the police station, they just have to do their job at the moment and they said they weren’t really happy about having to arrest me or anything but that’s what’s happening at the moment in our state.”
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
As a now retired police officer in the U.S., I would have refused to carry out that arrest on the grounds that it was unconstitutional, and I would have accepted the consequences of not doing it. I would have fought those consequences through legal means until hell froze over though.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
The crime, or the pregnancy and pyjamas?
The crime. The image of this harmless woman in her home, in her pajamas, getting handcuffed for a Facebook post makes her even more sympathetic. But it's the crime that I really object to. When I was still working, there is zero chance you'd see me in that video. ZERO.
 

greggerypeccary

Active member
The crime. The image of this harmless woman in her home, in her pajamas, getting handcuffed for a Facebook post makes her even more sympathetic. But it's the crime that I really object to. When I was still working, there is zero chance you'd see me in that video. ZERO.
The optics are completely irrelevant.

And I fully support this particular law - don't go promoting crimes on Facebook.
 

greggerypeccary

Active member
In December 2010, a former New York EMT, Mark Musarella, pleaded guilty to charges of misconduct and disorderly conduct, according to the AP. "Prosecutors say Musarella responded to a March 30, 2009, emergency call in Staten Island, where he snapped a picture of a woman who had been strangled. He then posted the image on [Facebook], the AP also writes.
London Eley of Philadelphia allegedly used Facebook to find and hire someone to kill Corey White, the father of her child. "I will pay somebody a stack to kill my baby father," Eley wrote, according 6ABC.com. A man named Timothy Bynum allegedly accepted Eley's offer, writing, "say no more," "what he look like?" and "need dat stack 1st," reports 6ABC.com. White alerted the authorities to the alleged correspondence between Eley and Bynum, both of whom were taken into custody in June 2011. White was shot in August while Eley and Bynum remained in jail.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
The optics are completely irrelevant.

And I fully support this particular law - don't go promoting crimes on Facebook.
What if you and the vast majority of Australians supported a law against homosexuality? Arrest people for Facebook posts supporting homosexuality? Wouldn't that be promoting crimes on Facebook?

I like our freedom of speech.
 

greggerypeccary

Active member
What if you and the vast majority of Australians supported a law against homosexuality? Arrest people for Facebook posts supporting homosexuality? Wouldn't that be promoting crimes on Facebook?

I like our freedom of speech.
There are lots of laws I don't agree with.

However, if i decided to encourage people on Facebook to break those laws, I would fully expect to be apprehended by the police.

If you don't like a particular law, do something legal to fight it.

Lobby your local politician.

Create a petition.

Run for office yourself.

But don't break the law.
 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
My "Americanism" finds it abhorrent to arrest a pregnant lady for a Facebook post.

I like our 1st Amendment, and I wouldn't trade it away for anything. I am happy to live with speech that ignorant, absurd, or dishonest, in exchange for thinking for ourselves and deciding for ourselves about things.

do you let pregnant women break the law in the US?
 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
What if you and the vast majority of Australians supported a law against homosexuality? Arrest people for Facebook posts supporting homosexuality? Wouldn't that be promoting crimes on Facebook?

I like our freedom of speech.

we've only recently allowed gay marriage in the last few years ... prior to that there were plenty of facebook posts both for and against, no one got arrested for it. As long as your post isn't aimed at gathering a group of people to go 'poofter bashing' with you, then you'll be fine.
 
A

Auggie

Guest
Guest
My "Americanism" finds it abhorrent to arrest a pregnant lady for a Facebook post.

I like our 1st Amendment, and I wouldn't trade it away for anything. I am happy to live with speech that ignorant, absurd, or dishonest, in exchange for thinking for ourselves and deciding for ourselves about things.
The US Supreme Court has said that the First Amendment does not apply to certain things - for example, defamation, or words that incite violence and lead to imminent lawlessness.
 
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