Politics aside how is everyone doing ?

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
I am on tenterhooks. Found a nice bit of land, need to sell the block I bought without looking at it.

Cold but not as wet as some places. Away from the sea all of Tassie is cold. This one is can have temps down to -10°C but not often. Chill hours enough for all my trees, might have to shelter the pomegranate and protect early flowering trees.
 

Aussie

Ima da Sheriff
Staff member
Oh ... You guys would be in SOOOOO much trouble!
I still call them Black Boys. Used to go out in the bush when I was a kid and grab those 'spears' to use as arrows. They were pretty straight and about the right diameter.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
I still call them Black Boys. Used to go out in the bush when I was a kid and grab those 'spears' to use as arrows. They were pretty straight and about the right diameter.
"Black Boys." You guys would be in soooooo much trouble in the U.S.
 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
I've always called em black boys ...

My youngest killed mine. Couldn't walk past it without pulling out a 'leaf' ... one day there was nothing left.

I was annoyed because they take forever to grow and mine was just getting to a good size even if it was in a big pot ... and they are damn expensive.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
I'm fortunate in that I have heaps of them, mostly down on the creek.

Will have to set the one the dog was trying to catch the snake in on fire. . They DO take a very long time to grow. They can get bugs, so it is common practice if they look a little sad, to set them on fire. Nothing burns quite like a black boy.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
Oh Yes JS. No BS

A common practice, when the tree is looking a bit shabby, or perhaps bug-infested.
I mean these are in the ground... they have very deep root, and the fire refreshed the plant. Bushfires happen naturally in many places where you find these small 'trees'.

The one my dog was hunting snake in is overdue, and as everything is really green, here, and I also have a big pile of fallen plant matter, like branches and weeds,, etc, I will probably set fire to my little stack, as they are called, and that Black Boy. (y)
 
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johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
Oh Yes JS. No BS

A common practice, when the tree is looking a bit shabby, or perhaps bug-infested.
I mean these are in the ground... they have very deep root, and the fire refreshed the plant. Bushfires happen naturally in many places where you find these small 'trees'.

The one my dog was hunting snake in is overdue, and as everything is really green, here, and I also have a big pile of fallen plant matter, like branches and weeds,, etc, I will probably set fire to my little stack, as they are called, and that Black Boy. (y)
thanks .. i didn't know that
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Tassy has a lot of wooden fences, here in Adelaide Colorbond (colored galvanised & corrugated iron) is the go. In George Town I would need to have fence posts 60cm/2' down and every second or third at least 900mm/3' or even more, the clay moving (swelling & shrinking) and being so soft when wet. Seen plenty fences leaning more than a bit in that part of town.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Tassy has a lot of wooden fences, here in Adelaide Colorbond (colored galvanised & corrugated iron) is the go. In George Town I would need to have fence posts 60cm/2' down and every second or third at least 900mm/3' or even more, the clay moving (swelling & shrinking) and being so soft when wet. Seen plenty fences leaning more than a bit in that part of town.
Digging post holes and working with concrete is no fun, and so people try to take the easy way. They dig narrow holes and only use a little concrete or even none at all. That's how you end up with a leaning fence. The holes should be 3 times the size of the post. So, if it's a 4X4 post, the hole should be 12 inches in diameter. The post hole should be 2 1/2 feet deep. The bottom 6 inches should be gravel for water drainage. With the post in the hole and level, the hole should be filled with concrete and then built up at least 4 inches above ground level to provide for water runoff. And of course, it should be a pressure treated post. Done that way, it should stay straight and resist rot for a long, long time. And corner posts should be 6X6. Posts with a gate attached should be 6X6 as well.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Had I not sold the George Town block I would have had a 1500mm/5' colorbond fence installed down one side (2 other sides belonged to the owners of the big block to the side and rear of my block, no need for a fence and the front was trees, weeds and blackberry vines, courtesy one BLOODY slack council. By building a low fence I would ensure maximum sunlight for the vines I planned to plant around the sides of my block, thinking being who is going to pull down a nice new fence already there to put up a 1800mm fence. If that had happened I would have refused to pay any of the cost.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
ah fences.. neighbours .. yes well .
there is Law covering the issue of boundary fences. I assume, not having looked at it for a couple of decades , the laws are still current.

The Fences Act.? Something like that.

If someone wants a different fence than the one on the boundary, or a new fence where there was none before, they must talk to the neighbour.
They must notify you. If they don't, and proceed, you don't have to pay anything.
But you know this already...
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
I would not pay. I would not ask payment for the fence I intended to put up. History now. If the block I mentioned to you becomes mine I would fence a big backyard for any dog I would have—can’t let dogs roam in farm country.

If a smaller block, would proceed as for George Town if needed, low fence to north and west.
 
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