Perseverance

HBS Guy

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A month on Mars: what NASA’s Perseverance rover has found so far
No signs of past life have emerged yet, but rocks at the landing site show signs of having been shaped by wind and water.

Alexandra Witze

The first drive on Mars of NASA’s Perseverance rover

Perseverance took its first drive on Martian soil on 4 March.Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


NASA’s Perseverance rover has had a busy first month on Mars’s surface. From Jezero Crater, where Perseverance landed on 18 February, it has been doing as much geology as it can — snapping pictures of its surroundings and analysing the rocks nearby. Already, team scientists have determined that several of the rocks are chemically similar to volcanic rocks on Earth, and that wind and water have eroded some of them. . . .

As planned, the rover’s main science experiments will have to wait a few more months, while engineers continue to test its scientific instruments and prepare for the first helicopter flight on another world. Eventually, Perseverance will deploy an arsenal of tools, including a drill bit, a close-up camera and multiple chemical sensors to hunt for signs of past life in Martian rocks. . . .

The delta, deposited billions of years ago by a river flowing on Mars, would have been an ideal landscape for ancient microbial life, had such life existed. But a treacherous dune field, which the rover cannot cross, lies between Perseverance and the delta. Researchers are discussing whether to drive the rover clockwise or counterclockwise around the dune field; the latter would make for a shorter trip, but the former would take Perseverance past a greater variety of interesting rocks. . . .

First, Perseverance must drive to a suitable spot for it to test Ingenuity, its helicopter. This place will probably be a rock-strewn area not too far from the rover’s current location. There, the rover will lower Ingenuity from its belly, drive off a safe distance and shoot a video as the helicopter takes to the Martian skies. “We’re looking forward to those historic, aviation-first movies,” said Jim Bell, a planetary scientist at Arizona State University in Tempe who leads one of the rover’s camera teams. The helicopter test comes first because Ingenuity will fly with the rover as it drives, helping Perseverance to navigate its way across the landscape.
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-00698-5

Wind AND WATER! RIVER FLOWING!

A previous Rover saw rocks that looked like they had been eroded and deposited as if by water. Seems that is no longer in doubt.

A fucking helicopter on Mars! Wow!
 
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HBS Guy

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Awesome is the word! Looking forward to reading about the geology Perseverance finds!
 

HBS Guy

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Yes. Before the age of powerful but affordable computers NASA had a staff of thousands of mostly negro women doing the calculations for rocket flights.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
Isn't it awesome what man can do these days!
AND isn't it also disgusting what WE do to other humans.? WHY such a DIVISION , when people are dying from everything you can think of,

I would have thought such investments in Mars, the Moon etc is just a diversion, when all the money and effort could have been turned to repairing and planning and taking action , on climate change.

No value for money.. it's just another example of human arrogance and hubris.
Better to look after OUR HOME.. a closed system, than to look to a burnt world.
Mars is the God of War...
Perhaps we've been there already, and laid it waste.

Just like we're doing here. This space shit is so irrelevant to NOW.
Yes it's amazing, but it is not needed, at THIS TIME in human history.

We can't keep running from our mistakes, and failures.
 

HBS Guy

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No!

Abstract scientific research time after time brings real solutions while targeted, specific research brings a lot less!
 

johnsmith

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I would have thought such investments in Mars, the Moon etc is just a diversion, when all the money and effort could have been turned to repairing and planning and taking action , on climate change.
it's not a diversion, it's research. Maybe the benefits aren't immediately visible, but there will be benefits.

You'd be surprised how much we've benefited from the 'space race' and space research. Modern day artificial limbs were developed for space vehicles, scratch resistant lenses used today with most sun and prescription glassed were developed as a way to protect astronauts visors, the modern day 'insulin pump; was developed to monitor astronauts vitals whilst in space, modern day fire retardants, dust busters, velcro, CAT scans, wireless headsets, lasik technology used for lasik eye surgery , memory foam, infrared thermometers, insulation, laptops, LED's, even the mouse you use for your computer ... all developed for space exploration and then adopted for commercial use.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
I DO understand the importance of research and I accept that space exploration has kick-started many new good things....... because of the glory factor.. SPACE the final frontier.. it's true... but I really think we should be able to manage our OWN frontiers first.

Just think if the same fervour for space research was directed at Earth research. Hey, the stars will always be there, but WE may not.
 

HBS Guy

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I DO understand the importance of research and I accept that space exploration has kick-started many new good things....... because of the glory factor.. SPACE the final frontier.. it's true... but I really think we should be able to manage our OWN frontiers first.

Just think if the same fervour for space research was directed at Earth research. Hey, the stars will always be there, but WE may not.
As I said, it doesn’t work that way: many more solutions come out of pure than from applied research.
 
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