Not good news for renewables ... Fire breaks out at Tesla Australia mega-battery during testing

Squire

Active member
https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-...ralia-mega-battery-during-testing-2021-07-30/

Fire breaks out at Tesla Australia mega-battery during testing


SYDNEY, July 30 (Reuters) - A fire broke out in a Tesla Inc battery in Australia on Friday during testing of one of the world's biggest energy storage batteries, at a project run by France's Neoen SA, fire authorities and a Neoen spokesperson said.

The fire erupted during an initial trial of the high-profile energy project known as the Victorian Big Battery near Melbourne on Friday morning local time, authorities said, adding that nobody was injured and the facility was evacuated.

"Neoen and Tesla are working closely with emergency services on site to manage the situation," said Neoen SA managing director Louis de Sambucy.
 

Texan

Active member
How are they planning to use this battery on the grid? Do they have huge inverters to feed the grid each night? I know lithium ion batteries cycle much better than most batteries, but i don't see how that could be as reliable and economical as necessary at that scale.

How much per kwh is electricity in Australia? I'm paying only 7.9 cents in Texas right now.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho 💉💉
Staff member
Big batteries are there to:

1. Regulate the output of the windfarm it is located in

2. Provide grid services—keep the national grid frequency in a certain range when a fossil fuel plant crashes off-line.
 

Squire

Active member
How are they planning to use this battery on the grid? Do they have huge inverters to feed the grid each night? I know lithium ion batteries cycle much better than most batteries, but i don't see how that could be as reliable and economical as necessary at that scale.

How much per kwh is electricity in Australia? I'm paying only 7.9 cents in Texas right now.
I don't believe you are paying only 7.9 cents per kWh. Electricity retailers in the USA have very clever ways of hiding the charges so you actually have to divide your total monthly bill by the kWh you used to find out how much you are really paying.

Yes, nominal advertised rates in Texas are as low as 6.9 cents, but there are other costs on top which blow the real costs higher.

I lived in Houston alone for 3 years in a one-bedroom apartment 10 years ago and my electricity cost was never less than US$100 a month and I never used air con, used energy saving lamps, and was away from home 12 hours every day with 10 hours in the office and two hours commuting and I didn't engage in any activities that consumed large amounts of electricity.

If electricity costs were really 6.9 c in Texas no rational person would ever spend tens of thousands of dollars on Solar systems.

How much are you paying a month?
 

Texan

Active member
My bill for a 4 br house last month (Summer) was $137. It was a mild month in terms of heat. I locked in the 7.9 cent rate for a 22 month contract. I'll have to renegotiate with them or another electric provider when that contract expires at the current rates.

Here is the website where you can choose your electricity provider and your plan. I entered a nearby zip code.

 
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Squire

Active member
My bill for a 4 br house last month (Summer) was $137. It was a mild month in terms of heat. I locked in the 7.9 cent rate for a 22 month contract. I'll have to renegotiate with them or another electric provider when that contract expires at the current rates.

Here is the website where you can choose your electricity provider and your plan. I entered a nearby zip code.

So you are not rushing out to pay $110,000 for Tesla solar power system with battery?

https://www.theverge.com/2021/4/12/22380057/tesla-solar-roof-price-increase-contract-amount

Tesla is burning its solar roof customers with a huge price increase
55
From $35,000 to $75,000 for one customer

By Andrew J. Hawkins@andyjayhawk Apr 12, 2021, 2:40pm EDT

Tesla has dramatically increased the price for its solar roof, angering some customers who have responded by canceling their orders. The news was first reported over the weekend by Electrek.

The price jumps come as Tesla reports increasing revenue from its solar business. During the fourth quarter of 2020, the company installed 86 mega-watts (MW) of solar energy, a 59 percent increase year over year. For the entire year, Tesla installed 205 MW of solar energy, an 18 percent increase compared to 2019.

Tesla offers two solar products: solar panels, which are installed over a customer’s existing roof; and a solar roof, which replaces the current roof slats with ones capable of soaking up the sun’s rays and transforming it into energy.

Now, prices for Tesla’s solar roof product are starting to go up dramatically. One solar roof customer told The Verge he signed a contract in February to install the solar roof for $35,000, with an additional $30,000 for the batteries.

HE RECEIVED A “TERSE EMAIL” STATING THAT HE WOULD RECEIVE A NEW CONTRACT WITH HIGHER PRICES
Later, he received a “terse email” from Tesla stating that in several days he would receive a new contract with higher prices. He was told he now owed $75,000 for the solar roof — a 114 percent increase — and $35,000 for the batteries.
 

Texan

Active member
Big batteries are there to:

1. Regulate the output of the windfarm it is located in

2. Provide grid services—keep the national grid frequency in a certain range when a fossil fuel plant crashes off-line.
I assume they have lots of giant inverters to convert the DC in the batteries to AC? That's a lot of inverter and expense.
 

Texan

Active member
So you are not rushing out to pay $110,000 for Tesla solar power system with battery?

https://www.theverge.com/2021/4/12/22380057/tesla-solar-roof-price-increase-contract-amount
My friend whom I used to work with bought and installed his own system just over a year ago. His entire electric bill for the entire first year after installation was $67. That included a $5/month hookup fee for access to the net metering.

He bought 3 5kw inverters and each inverter comes with 3kw of solar panels. He mounted the panels on the roof of his shop and the inverters on the wall of his shop. The inverters simply backfeed power onto the grid and, with net metering, the meter runs both ways. At the end of the month, he settles the difference with the power company. He paid a total of $13.5k for the equipment. He figures that the equipment will be paid for in just under 3 years. After that, he gets free electricity. It doesn't work during power outages, but he doesn't have to worry about paying for, charging, and maintaining batteries.

I can sometimes get free used lead acid batteries from work, but I'm not sure if I want to mess with them. It depends on how much it will cost to get electricity on my land after I buy it. I'm hoping to begin construction within a few months after my divorce is final. I plan to provide my own electricity. I haven't decided the configuration of the system. That will depend on the land and available utilities.
 
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Texan

Active member
Lead acid batteries = hydrogen gas is generated. LOTS good ventilation!
I would want to put them in a dedicated temperature controlled outbuilding and that would be cost prohibitive. Net metering is the way to go if it's available. Your energy production will also ease the pressure on the grid during peak hours because you will be making more power than you are using at that time of day.

I work on Uninterruptible Power Supplies for a living and they almost exclusively use lead acid batteries. VRLA and wet cell batteries. I could probably keep a cabinet of VRLA batteries in my shop, but I would have to include CO and hydrogen detectors and fire extinguishers. I could definitely put batteries in my shop if I include a breezeway between the house and the shop under a common roof. That way, the buildings don't share common air but sharing an electrical system and plumbing is no problem.
 
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