Huge winter melt in the Arctic

HBS Guy

Head Honcho 💉💉
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The previous NH summer saw low Framm Strait export and thin, low quality ice with the extent/area parameters showing an increase tho I doubt volume went up. and the ice was low quality, more slush than solid ice.

This was shown spectacularly by a deep low (down to 937) and consequent storm that caused huge melt in parts of the Arctic—this winter melt is unique, none other known.

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3648.msg330881.html#msg330881
 
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HBS Guy

Head Honcho 💉💉
Staff member
The Polar Science Center at the University of Washington has released the PIOMAS volume data for February 2022:

Average Arctic sea ice volume in February 2022 was 19,700 km3. This value is the 9th lowest on record for February, about 2,400 km^3 above the record set in 2017. Monthly ice volume was 35% below the maximum in 1979 and 18% below the mean value for 1979-2021. Average February 2022 ice volume was 1.25 standard deviations above the 1979-2021 trend line. Ice growth anomalies for February 2022 continued to be at the upper end of the most recent decade:

The ice thickness anomaly map for February 2022 relative to 2011-2020 shows positive anomalies in the Beaufort and Chukchi but negative anomalies in the Kara and Laptev Seas from. The negative anomalies that have been present North of Greenland are weakening and a positive anomaly exists north of Baffin Island:

CryoSat 2 ice thickness shows an overall similar pattern of sea ice thickness anomalies though the areas North of Greenland and Baffin Bay show substantial differences:

Here’s an interesting new paper on Arctic sea ice thickness, and hence volume, derived from both from both ICESat-2 and CryoSat-2 data:

Arctic snow depth, ice thickness and volume from ICESat-2 and CryoSat-2: 2018-2021

The measurement concept is based on differencing the freeboards from IS-2 (which measures the height of the air-snow interface above the local sea surface) and CS-2 (which measures the height of the snow-ice interface above the local sea surface)…
For the three years between 2019 and 2021, there is a decrease in both the mean April snow depth (~2.50cm) and ice thickness (~0.28m). Spatial composites of snow and ice thickness in 2019-20 and 2020-21 show notable thinning of both these variables in the MY-ice regions north of Greenland and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The thinning is higher over multiyear ice (compared to the first-year ice) with an end-of-season thickness in 2021 that is lower by ~16.1% (0.50m). Overall, thinning of the ice covers over the period are largely explained by decreases in MY-ice thickness and coverage. In contrast, variability in end-of-season FY-ice thickness (between 1.84 and 2.03 m) seems insignificant.
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3749.0.html
 
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