Chuckies Mantra

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Chuckies Mantra

Postby Chuck » 06 Feb 2020, 15:02

Whatever mankind does, has consequences in the future!
What is perceived as a solution is only relative to our current eyes and minds.
The best we can hope for, is that our perceived solution is actually less harmful in the future to ourselves, the fauna, flora and environment


If think these are similar words, I may have been using, whilst I was rabbiting on about something in previous posts.

Now, it is time to introduce little bit history lesson about the environment and pollution that supports my mantra.

In the annals of transportation history persists a tale of how automobiles in the early 20th century helped cities conquer their waste problems. It’s a tidy story, so to speak, about dirty horses and clean cars and technological innovation. As typically told, it’s a lesson we can learn from today, now that cars are their own environmental disaster, one that technology can no doubt solve.

The story makes perfect sense to modern ears and noses: After all, Americans love their cars! And who’d want to walk through ankle-deep horse manure to buy a newspaper?
"In New York City alone, depositing manure at a rate of roughly 35 pounds per day, per horse. It piled high in vacant lots and “lined city streets like banks of snow.”

A main solution, as they portray it, came in the form of cars, which, compared to horses, were a godsend, their adoption inevitable. “The automobile, cheaper to own and operate than a horse-drawn vehicle was proclaimed an ‘environmental savior.’ Cities around the world were able to take a deep breath—without holding their noses at last—and resume their march of progress.”

History loves smooth transitions, such as horses to cars. “There’s an assumption that you have this clean break between eras,” says urban historian Martin Melosi. “In the real world, that doesn’t happen” The idea of a neat transition from horses to the automobile age is a history-as-approved-by-victors myth that elides several decades when horse travel
declined but automobiles were uncommon, used primarily to haul freight. The automobile as we now conceive it, a personal transport machine, wouldn’t come along for nearly half a century.
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Re: Chuckies Mantra

Postby DonDeeHippy » 06 Feb 2020, 16:56

Chuck wrote:Whatever mankind does, has consequences in the future!
What is perceived as a solution is only relative to our current eyes and minds.
The best we can hope for, is that our perceived solution is actually less harmful in the future to ourselves, the fauna, flora and environment


If think these are similar words, I may have been using, whilst I was rabbiting on about something in previous posts.

Now, it is time to introduce little bit history lesson about the environment and pollution that supports my mantra.

In the annals of transportation history persists a tale of how automobiles in the early 20th century helped cities conquer their waste problems. It’s a tidy story, so to speak, about dirty horses and clean cars and technological innovation. As typically told, it’s a lesson we can learn from today, now that cars are their own environmental disaster, one that technology can no doubt solve.

The story makes perfect sense to modern ears and noses: After all, Americans love their cars! And who’d want to walk through ankle-deep horse manure to buy a newspaper?
"In New York City alone, depositing manure at a rate of roughly 35 pounds per day, per horse. It piled high in vacant lots and “lined city streets like banks of snow.”

A main solution, as they portray it, came in the form of cars, which, compared to horses, were a godsend, their adoption inevitable. “The automobile, cheaper to own and operate than a horse-drawn vehicle was proclaimed an ‘environmental savior.’ Cities around the world were able to take a deep breath—without holding their noses at last—and resume their march of progress.”

History loves smooth transitions, such as horses to cars. “There’s an assumption that you have this clean break between eras,” says urban historian Martin Melosi. “In the real world, that doesn’t happen” The idea of a neat transition from horses to the automobile age is a history-as-approved-by-victors myth that elides several decades when horse travel
declined but automobiles were uncommon, used primarily to haul freight. The automobile as we now conceive it, a personal transport machine, wouldn’t come along for nearly half a century.

Even though Electric cars are cleaner quitter and more economical, there is so much money in Fossil fuels we are finding it very hard to transition...

Replacing one with another will have short term benefits... not addressing if we actually need that many cars on the road or more public transport it really the bigger question , are we doing the right thing or just swapping DDT for Round Up...
Bongalong... for some reason women are just so superior to anything that ever existed or will ever exist!
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