Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh water

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Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh water

Postby Squire » 13 Jan 2020, 18:36

Apart from the ash carried by winds, when the rains come all the ash on the ground will be washed into rivers and water storage, and into the sea adjacent to the coastline.

Given the low state of rivers and water storage, the amount of pollution will be huge compared to the present water quantities.

Ash that has already been deposited on the ground all over Australia will find its way into rivers and the sea adjacent to the coastline.

[url]https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2020/01/australian-fires-threaten-to-pollute-water/[url][/url][/url]

Australia's raging fires will create big problems for fresh drinking water
When huge quantities of ash wash into rivers, dams, and eventually the sea, they will likely pollute water supplies and kill aquatic wildlife.
6 MINUTE READ
BY JOHN PICKRELL

PUBLISHED JANUARY 10, 2020

SYDNEY, NEW SOUTH WALESIn the wake of the enormous fires that have razed huge swathes of drought-stricken Australia, scientists fear that when rains eventually fall, they will wash charred debris into rivers, dams, and the ocean, killing wildlife and even tainting the drinking supplies of major cities, such as Sydney.

For many weeks, ash, soot, and blackened gum tree leaves have collected along the shorelines of Sydney’s beaches, clogging the waves and lapping in the tide. Originating in fires blazing in forested areas to the west, the debris has been carried on the breeze along with the pungent bushfire smoke that blanketed Australia’s largest city for much of December.

But what has carried on the wind is just a taste of the huge quantities of debris that are likely to wash into rivers once there are heavy downpours. As of press time, more than 26 million acres—an area bigger than Portugal—have now burned, mostly in the continent’s southeast. That includes areas of land known as catchments—also called watersheds—where rainfall begins its earthly journey into specific rivers, lakes, and dams.

It is an ecological disaster unprecedented in Australia’s history, and that spells trouble for drinking water supplies, coastal ecosystems, and the freshwater rivers that support iconic Australian wildlife, such as the platypus. (Australia's flying foxes are already dying en mass due to the extreme heat.)

“Disturbance on this scale is almost certainly going to impact biodiversity. I’m remarkably worried about the effects on freshwater ecosystems,” says Ross Thompson, a freshwater ecologist at the University of Canberra.

“Given the severity of the fires, pretty much everything [in burned landscapes] is gone, so one of the big issues is that when we do get some rain, a lot of that ash and crap, nothing is going to stop it running in our catchments,” adds Ricky Spencer, a conservationist and ecologist at the University of Western Sydney in New South Wales (NSW).

Algal blooms and fish kills
One of the biggest worries is that the sudden influx of nutrients into waterways may lead to “blackwater events” caused by blooms of blue-green algae, also called cyanobacteria. Oxygen can subsequently drop to dangerously low levels for other aquatic life, potentially leading to mass fish kills and affecting species such as freshwater turtles.

Blooms caused by agricultural run-off and the ongoing drought led to the death of millions of fish—mostly golden perch and Murray cod, which are important recreational Australian fish species—in the rivers of western NSW last summer. Algal blooms were likely this year anyway in drought-afflicted waterways, but Spencer fears they will be exacerbated by the bushfires.

“These [blooms] could be ongoing until we start to see some growth along the river systems, or have a really good flush of rain,” he says.

Some research has also shown that fire mobilizes mercury in runoff, adds Katherine Dafforn, an environmental scientist at both Macquarie University in Sydney and the Sydney Institute of Marine Science.

“Higher concentrations of mercury have been found in fish from lakes in burned catchments compared to reference catchments,” she says, with potential impacts for human health if fish at the top of the food chain are eaten.

Algal blooms in dams could lead to significant problems for the water supply of major cities, such as Sydney and Melbourne. Warragamba Dam, to the west of Sydney, provides drinking water for 3.7 million people. But vast bushfires in and around its catchment area have so far burned more than 148,000 acres of forest.

Forests have burned across “80 to 90 percent of the significant parts of the catchment,” says Stuart Khan, an engineer at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney who studies contaminants in water treatment processes.

Tainted water
A bushfire in the catchment in 2006 was the likely cause of an algal bloom that lasted several months in the dam in 2007, and the current bushfires are far more extensive.

Algal blooms in the drinking supply are problematic for several reasons. The resultant deoxygenation can cause fish kills, but it also makes iron and manganese soluble, which can give water a poor taste, odor, and color. Cyanobacteria can also produce chemicals that give water a musty or earthy flavor.

In rare cases, blooms produce dangerous cyanotoxins, which “will require a lot of attention to find out and be looking closely at what’s growing in these reservoirs,” adds Khan. While he thinks public health problems are unlikely in Sydney, he does worry about the challenge of keeping treatment plants running.

“We are not accustomed to having massive amounts of cyanobacteria and ash coming through our plants … and the treatment processes might be slowed down significantly,” he says.

With the current drought, Sydney’s water supplies are already overstretched, necessitating the use of a desalination plant. If the rate of production of treated water from Warragamba slows, it might lead to temporary but significant shortages and severe drought restrictions. Forested areas that make up water catchments have been incinerated throughout southeast Australia, and the fire crisis is likely to continue for several months, so it’s possible the drinking supply of many urban centers across the southeast could be affected by the end of the summer.

Platypus feeling the heat
The bushfires will likely have further serious effects on Australia’s river systems, which could exacerbate the dangers to the duck-billed platypus. Loss of shady vegetation around the small streams and pools it inhabits may raise water temperatures to levels it finds intolerable—typically anything above 83 degrees Fahrenheit.


“Platypus are weird little creatures, in that they don’t have any way of getting rid of heat. Their only response to warm water is to just sit in their burrow and hope it goes away,” says Thompson. During the terrible Millennium Drought 20 years ago, many platypuses simply retreated into their burrows and died there, he adds. (Find out more about the silent decline of the platypus.)

This year’s drought is even worse, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology last week reporting 2019 was the both the driest and hottest year in 120 years of record taking. It’s possible the platypus could become locally extinct in parts of the north and west of its eastern Australian range, something that Thompson’s research suggested was already on the cards with climate change.

“It’s becoming a death by a thousand cuts,” he says. “The Millennium Drought knocked back a lot of our freshwater biota. They’ve never quite recovered in many cases, and now we have these big landscape-scale fires… . It’s a real concern, and we could certainly lose species.”

Ocean watch
Eventually the ash, soot, and sediment that runs into the rivers will wash out to sea, but the effects of bushfires on marine life have been little studied and are much less certain.

“The scale of these fires are unprecedented, and the images we are seeing of ash- and soot-laden waves along our beaches indicate that there is a very high density in the water column, so that is likely to have localized effects in those areas,” says Emma Johnston, a marine ecologist at UNSW.

Detritus doesn’t necessarily have to be toxic to cause problems, as tiny particles can clog the gills of fish and the foraging apparatus of filter feeders such as mussels, sponges, and corals.

While few studies have looked at the impact of charcoal and ash on marine organisms and possible toxins generated by bushfires, it’s certainly possible they could be detrimental, adds Johnston, and the influx of nutrients into the ocean may also cause algal blooms there.

Thankfully, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has not yet been affected, as the focus of the fires have so far been further south, and the ocean currents carries water in a southerly direction, away from the reef.

Slow recovery
While very little is yet known about the effects of soot and ash on marine life, there could be an array of impacts if the levels of exposure are high enough, says Andrew Negri at the Australian Institute of Marine Science in Townsville, Queensland, who has studied the negative effects of coal dust from mining on the Great Barrier Reef.

For instance, shading limits the light that can reach marine plants, hindering growth. Or particles might contain metals, sulfur, and chemicals called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that can dissolve in seawater and become toxic to marine species.

However great the damage to Australia’s marine and freshwater ecosystems eventually is, it may be decades before it can be rectified.

“The striking thing is just how long the effects of these fires persist,” says Thompson. “The time it takes these systems to recover, particularly in terms of providing a water supply, is in the order of a decade. That’s important because both Sydney and Melbourne’s catchments have been reasonably badly affected by recent fire events.”
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Lols » 13 Jan 2020, 19:59

On news, Stanthorpe Queensland won’t have problems of ash in their water supply, the town has officially run out of water!
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-13/stanthorpe-water-runs-out-trucks-bring-in-loads-qld/11863432
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themsleves and wiser people so full of doubts" ~ Bertrand Russell
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Squire » 13 Jan 2020, 20:31

Lols wrote:On news, Stanthorpe Queensland won’t have problems of ash in their water supply, the town has officially run out of water!
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-13/stanthorpe-water-runs-out-trucks-bring-in-loads-qld/11863432


Evidently there is no shortage of beer or the clamor would be louder.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby HBS Guy » 13 Jan 2020, 20:46

Can’t wash in beer!
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Squire » 13 Jan 2020, 20:53

HBS Guy wrote:Can’t wash in beer!


You can't drink dishwater.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby DonDeeHippy » 14 Jan 2020, 11:09

that reminds me of the man who died in a vat of beer... he had to get out 6 times first though to pee, didn't want to wreak it....
Bongalong... for some reason women are just so superior to anything that ever existed or will ever exist!
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Dax » 16 Jan 2020, 14:58

Nature is ramping up in its effort to eliminate the destructive plague on earth, called ideological humanity. These fires will not only destroy the countries water supplies, but there is now talk of it contaminating the snowy mountains generation system ans closing it down if the ash is washed to fast into dams.

There are not enough desalination plants around the country ti supply just one small city, let alone the mega cities festering around the country and destroying it. Ground water is running out as they still continue issuing licences for multinational to use the ground water for coal, other mining and water bottling, all for profit growth., With city dams at the extremely low levels they are now, it will be interesting to see how this year pans out if there is no extremely large amounts of rain in catchment areas, which the majority now, consist of ash and contaminated ground from the thousands of tonnes of chemical fire retardants they spread everywhere.

Certainly a smart race this ideological humanity, they just love destruction and pollution.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Lols » 17 Jan 2020, 23:23

Dax wrote:Nature is ramping up in its effort to eliminate the destructive plague on earth, called ideological humanity. These fires will not only destroy the countries water supplies, but there is now talk of it contaminating the snowy mountains generation system ans closing it down if the ash is washed to fast into dams.

There are not enough desalination plants around the country ti supply just one small city, let alone the mega cities festering around the country and destroying it. Ground water is running out as they still continue issuing licences for multinational to use the ground water for coal, other mining and water bottling, all for profit growth., With city dams at the extremely low levels they are now, it will be interesting to see how this year pans out if there is no extremely large amounts of rain in catchment areas, which the majority now, consist of ash and contaminated ground from the thousands of tonnes of chemical fire retardants they spread everywhere.

Certainly a smart race this ideological humanity, they just love destruction and pollution.


So true, yet there are many caring empathic and aware humans trying to address the issues.
There’s always a greed factor, a controlling power factor, turning a blind eye that seemingly goes against what we all know is obvious.
I saw on the rolling news sub titles that Germany is going to aim to be coal free by 2038.
Why wait 18 years? This could have been done everywhere on this globe much earlier, with alternative energies that were presented but stopped along the way. Always thwarted.
Oil harms living beings health and the environment.
David Attenborough is really making his stance known against the way our atmosphere and earth are.
He has put forth urgency that we need to act immediately before it’s too late.

I had once heard some prediction of our water being poisoned, and this is how it’s happened, via fires and all that toxic smoke and ash fallen upon us and in our water supply.
We disconnected our tank water from any catchment from the roof and we had some very heavy rain recently, so that’s washed the roof down somewhat.

I don’t like the Silvan Dam (being a huge catchment for Melbourne tap water) having all that polluted smoke ascending upon it of late. I will never drink tap water, especially with fluoride in it! Now it’s a cocktail of who knows what!
And think of all the local orchards, vineyards, berries etc effected by this smoke pollution,
It’s a cycle of toxin in everything no matter how careful we will try to be. How do we avoid it?
I guess from 100 years ago, one in 100 persons got cancer, then a decade ago 1 in every 3 gets cancer.
So, what will the stats be in the very near future you reckon?
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themsleves and wiser people so full of doubts" ~ Bertrand Russell
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby pinkeye » 18 Jan 2020, 00:15

Dax wrote:Nature is ramping up in its effort to eliminate the destructive plague on earth, called ideological humanity. These fires will not only destroy the countries water supplies, but there is now talk of it contaminating the snowy mountains generation system ans closing it down if the ash is washed to fast into dams.

There are not enough desalination plants around the country ti supply just one small city, let alone the mega cities festering around the country and destroying it. Ground water is running out as they still continue issuing licences for multinational to use the ground water for coal, other mining and water bottling, all for profit growth., With city dams at the extremely low levels they are now, it will be interesting to see how this year pans out if there is no extremely large amounts of rain in catchment areas, which the majority now, consist of ash and contaminated ground from the thousands of tonnes of chemical fire retardants they spread everywhere.

Certainly a smart race this ideological humanity, they just love destruction and pollution.



Well we have brought this upon ourselves. NO EXCUSES.

The sooner humans cease to be dominant on Earth, the better.
sleeping is good for you
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Dax » 18 Jan 2020, 11:03

Lols wrote:
Dax wrote:Nature is ramping up in its effort to eliminate the destructive plague on earth, called ideological humanity. These fires will not only destroy the countries water supplies, but there is now talk of it contaminating the snowy mountains generation system ans closing it down if the ash is washed to fast into dams.

There are not enough desalination plants around the country ti supply just one small city, let alone the mega cities festering around the country and destroying it. Ground water is running out as they still continue issuing licences for multinational to use the ground water for coal, other mining and water bottling, all for profit growth., With city dams at the extremely low levels they are now, it will be interesting to see how this year pans out if there is no extremely large amounts of rain in catchment areas, which the majority now, consist of ash and contaminated ground from the thousands of tonnes of chemical fire retardants they spread everywhere.

Certainly a smart race this ideological humanity, they just love destruction and pollution.


So true, yet there are many caring empathic and aware humans trying to address the issues.
There’s always a greed factor, a controlling power factor, turning a blind eye that seemingly goes against what we all know is obvious.
I saw on the rolling news sub titles that Germany is going to aim to be coal free by 2038.
Why wait 18 years? This could have been done everywhere on this globe much earlier, with alternative energies that were presented but stopped along the way. Always thwarted.
Oil harms living beings health and the environment.
David Attenborough is really making his stance known against the way our atmosphere and earth are.
He has put forth urgency that we need to act immediately before it’s too late.

I had once heard some prediction of our water being poisoned, and this is how it’s happened, via fires and all that toxic smoke and ash fallen upon us and in our water supply.
We disconnected our tank water from any catchment from the roof and we had some very heavy rain recently, so that’s washed the roof down somewhat.

I don’t like the Silvan Dam (being a huge catchment for Melbourne tap water) having all that polluted smoke ascending upon it of late. I will never drink tap water, especially with fluoride in it! Now it’s a cocktail of who knows what!
And think of all the local orchards, vineyards, berries etc effected by this smoke pollution,
It’s a cycle of toxin in everything no matter how careful we will try to be. How do we avoid it?
I guess from 100 years ago, one in 100 persons got cancer, then a decade ago 1 in every 3 gets cancer.
So, what will the stats be in the very near future you reckon?


Have yet to meet many people who are providing an example to follow in preparing for the future and slowing the damage, lots talking about it over their coffee and cakes, whist they waste resources and water with their stupid water use and self centered life destroying lifestyle.

They are so stupid, they don't capture rain water, so 99% goes down the drain and as been predicted, rain in the climate change future will be infrequent, extremely heavy and 95% will be lost, along with the soil, ground cover and other vegetation. Just look at the damage the current rain events have caused after the fires, what's going into dams is contaminated with toxic ash, farming chemicals, fire retardant and chemical fertilisers.

This all goes into the animals you all eat and get your biological destructive diary products from, so everything you buy from the shops, is either imported from countries that have extreme pollution, or saturated with chemicals from intensive farming idiocy. Every piece of processed or packaged foods, is extremely contaminated with chemicals and antibiotics, as well as being imported. Which they need to stop the food from being uneatable and deteriorating before the chemicals show through.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Lols » 18 Jan 2020, 11:47

I don’t disagree in any way, our food chain is a product of the environment we as humans have created. A cesspool of pollution.
My hubby and I have always said that every new house or unit built should have a rain tank catching rain water off the roof.
But then, the big mains water companies supplying Melbourne water via meter for $$$$ came barging in and made rain tanks illegal!
Then it was changed to allowing a small tank for garden or flushing the toilet only.
We had the mains water put in front of our property some years ago and I’m grateful it wasn’t a forced requirement to connect because we don’t want it.
We have our own water and have survived a lifetime on rain tank water.
Knowing when to be more frugal during dryer times etc.
Our shower times are quick. Don’t need to stand under running water 10 minutes!
We knew long ago how people truly did need to be educated about being more aware of their water usage.
My kids when young would have friends sleepover, comes showertime, they are taking forever! I say to my kids, you need to tell them to be quick due to water restrictions.
I also tried to educate visitors, but it didn’t seem to register.

So that’s why, we will have many wasteful people because of the thought we will have abundance forever?

To educate the majority of how water restrictions work is a mammoth lesson that will take years or maybe until something real bad happens, like Stanthorpe township of 5000 people, now out of water.
But other people will brush that off and say it won’t happen to them, in their living space.

If we don’t respect it, we will lose it.
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themsleves and wiser people so full of doubts" ~ Bertrand Russell
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Jan 2020, 12:24

Planning on a 10,000L rainwater tank, maybe a 4000L tank to capture water off the carport roof.

Want to capture stormwater as well and grey water for flowers/decorative trees/shrubs. Even a 600L tank to capture water off chicken coop & garden shed roofs can provide water for chooks/top up pond. Will need to put down piers to support the tanks with my lovely clay.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Dax » 18 Jan 2020, 15:10

All my water is recycled at least twice, grey water goes through a natural treatment process and from there, it goes through the aquaponics system and from there into the toilet tanks. As we don't use any crap or animal products, plus we make our own soap from our own olive oil, all our grey and black water is easily cleaned and when it comes out of the septic tank, it goes onto the gardens, which love it as not only is it rich in good things, but it keeps the gardens healthy. The septic also provides us with methane for cooking.

As for showers, solved that problem long ago, have timers on all the showers, the timers are set at 2 minutes and then another 2 minutes. Have instructions on the showers, which says wet yourself down and when the water stops, soap up and push the button. Then another 2 minutes of water comes out to rinse off, this allows me to have 2 showers a day and use less than everyone else who have one and no water waste. the water for showers,washing and gardens, comes from the bore and the tank water is sued for cooking and drinking. Excess water is directed to our top dam and from there overflow goes into the bottom dam. This not only gives us plenty of water for irrigating the paddocks, but keeps sections of the bush moist and green, with a constant small flow of water between dams. The dams are aerated with solar water pumps, that way the dam trout have clean water a the time.

People in cities could do the same if they weren't so selfish and chronically lazy.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Bongalong » 18 Jan 2020, 15:58

pinkeye wrote:
Dax wrote:Nature is ramping up in its effort to eliminate the destructive plague on earth, called ideological humanity. These fires will not only destroy the countries water supplies, but there is now talk of it contaminating the snowy mountains generation system ans closing it down if the ash is washed to fast into dams.

There are not enough desalination plants around the country ti supply just one small city, let alone the mega cities festering around the country and destroying it. Ground water is running out as they still continue issuing licences for multinational to use the ground water for coal, other mining and water bottling, all for profit growth., With city dams at the extremely low levels they are now, it will be interesting to see how this year pans out if there is no extremely large amounts of rain in catchment areas, which the majority now, consist of ash and contaminated ground from the thousands of tonnes of chemical fire retardants they spread everywhere.

Certainly a smart race this ideological humanity, they just love destruction and pollution.



Well we have brought this upon ourselves. NO EXCUSES.

The sooner humans cease to be dominant on Earth, the better.

Most humans don't do anything wrong: do you ever consider such things? :rain
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Jan 2020, 17:48

Smoke is causing problems too—and I inhaled it or much of a day in Melbourne and again in Tasmania for a day, not as dense as in Melbourne but bad enough:

https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/state/vic/2020/01/15/bushfires-death-toll-rises
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Dax » 19 Jan 2020, 15:01

Bongalong wrote:Most humans don't do anything wrong: do you ever consider such things? :rain


If that was the case, there wouldn't be any problems, but it's the opposite so your claim is typical of denialists, deranged, blind to reality and what a typical ideologue would say in their desperation to deny the truth.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Bongalong » 19 Jan 2020, 19:42

Dax wrote:
Bongalong wrote:Most humans don't do anything wrong: do you ever consider such things? :rain


If that was the case, there wouldn't be any problems, but it's the opposite so your claim is typical of denialists, deranged, blind to reality and what a typical ideologue would say in their desperation to deny the truth.

You're an extremist mate! :tweed :yak yak :yak yak :yak yak :yak yak :yak yak :roll :rain :rain :rain :rain :rain
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby pinkeye » 19 Jan 2020, 22:37

Bongalong wrote:
pinkeye wrote:
Dax wrote:Nature is ramping up in its effort to eliminate the destructive plague on earth, called ideological humanity. These fires will not only destroy the countries water supplies, but there is now talk of it contaminating the snowy mountains generation system ans closing it down if the ash is washed to fast into dams.

There are not enough desalination plants around the country ti supply just one small city, let alone the mega cities festering around the country and destroying it. Ground water is running out as they still continue issuing licences for multinational to use the ground water for coal, other mining and water bottling, all for profit growth., With city dams at the extremely low levels they are now, it will be interesting to see how this year pans out if there is no extremely large amounts of rain in catchment areas, which the majority now, consist of ash and contaminated ground from the thousands of tonnes of chemical fire retardants they spread everywhere.

Certainly a smart race this ideological humanity, they just love destruction and pollution.



Well we have brought this upon ourselves. NO EXCUSES.

The sooner humans cease to be dominant on Earth, the better.

Most humans don't do anything wrong: do you ever consider such things? :rain


Yes I do indeed.
I don't agree, though. Most humans DO lot's of things wrong. Not on purpose, unless it happen's to be a BUSINESS. They'll doo anything for profit.
Private citizens, on the other hand, are just mostly ignorant about the harm they produce, just by consuming.

People like DAX really understand what we face for the future, and he is really motivated... really motivated to solve issues he can foresee as most likely to occur.

I like reading his posts because his outlook is perfectly reasonable, and he seems to have taken some very significant measures to deal with lots of possible problems.

I wish you good luck Dax.
Seems the future is rushing at us ever faster.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby pinkeye » 19 Jan 2020, 22:39

HBS Guy wrote:Planning on a 10,000L rainwater tank, maybe a 4000L tank to capture water off the carport roof.

Want to capture stormwater as well and grey water for flowers/decorative trees/shrubs. Even a 600L tank to capture water off chicken coop & garden shed roofs can provide water for chooks/top up pond. Will need to put down piers to support the tanks with my lovely clay.


I've got 2 5000 GALLON water tanks, and it takes a lot of rain to fill them, because I live in a little house. Small roof area. But this recent rain has been wonderful. :bgrin
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Bongalong » 20 Jan 2020, 22:41

pinkeye wrote:
Bongalong wrote:
pinkeye wrote:
Dax wrote:Nature is ramping up in its effort to eliminate the destructive plague on earth, called ideological humanity. These fires will not only destroy the countries water supplies, but there is now talk of it contaminating the snowy mountains generation system ans closing it down if the ash is washed to fast into dams.

There are not enough desalination plants around the country ti supply just one small city, let alone the mega cities festering around the country and destroying it. Ground water is running out as they still continue issuing licences for multinational to use the ground water for coal, other mining and water bottling, all for profit growth., With city dams at the extremely low levels they are now, it will be interesting to see how this year pans out if there is no extremely large amounts of rain in catchment areas, which the majority now, consist of ash and contaminated ground from the thousands of tonnes of chemical fire retardants they spread everywhere.

Certainly a smart race this ideological humanity, they just love destruction and pollution.



Well we have brought this upon ourselves. NO EXCUSES.

The sooner humans cease to be dominant on Earth, the better.

Most humans don't do anything wrong: do you ever consider such things? :rain


Yes I do indeed.
I don't agree, though. Most humans DO lot's of things wrong. Not on purpose, unless it happen's to be a BUSINESS. They'll doo anything for profit.
Private citizens, on the other hand, are just mostly ignorant about the harm they produce, just by consuming.

People like DAX really understand what we face for the future, and he is really motivated... really motivated to solve issues he can foresee as most likely to occur.

I like reading his posts because his outlook is perfectly reasonable, and he seems to have taken some very significant measures to deal with lots of possible problems.

I wish you good luck Dax.
Seems the future is rushing at us ever faster.

You're off your head! :rofl
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby pinkeye » 21 Jan 2020, 01:00

:bgrin

so bongalong, your little apartment on the 3rd flr in inner suburbia is pretty boring eh.?

Well I imagine that is the sort of place you live.. as you think people looking forwards with some hope are hilarious. I imagine you're not particularly well-placed, and that is sad.
Myself..? I think we've fucked it all already, and this is just the start.

Good luck to Dax.

I don't see myself in an old folks home. Just think how our society will suffer from this on-going threat.

Less food. less profit.. the old folks'll starve.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Dax » 21 Jan 2020, 13:07

Bongalong wrote:
Dax wrote:
Bongalong wrote:Most humans don't do anything wrong: do you ever consider such things? :rain


If that was the case, there wouldn't be any problems, but it's the opposite so your claim is typical of denialists, deranged, blind to reality and what a typical ideologue would say in their desperation to deny the truth.

You're an extremist mate! :tweed :yak yak :yak yak :yak yak :yak yak :yak yak :roll :rain :rain :rain :rain :rain


I'm a rational realist, to a cloned ideologue incapable of anything but denial and toeing the line of consumerism, waste and destruction, my lifestyle and approach would seem extreme.

To me extremists are those in denial of reality, god nutters, capitalists, economic ideologues and urbane clones. They are the extremists, they have no thought for all the water, resources and land they destroy just to feed their never ending gluttonous behaviour. When you consider the majority are obese wastes of space, who never stop eating shit and do nothing to secure their future, to a realist, they are the true extremists.

Not only will fires create water problems, but the majority of rain, as I have stated here probably a year or so ago, will be short very heavy storms,which will destroy crops and do nothing of worth for the land as most will run off taking top soil with it. You need soaking rain to benefit the land, not heavy flash storms and floods, but that's exactly what's happening.

Sure the rain has put out mos fires, but see what it looks like in 6 months. You will more than likely see nothing but denuded water ways, dry barren land and dying ecology.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby pinkeye » 22 Jan 2020, 05:55

This is an important issue for us all. I wonder what the government CAN do.

No wave of a magic wand, or prayer to god will repair and solve this.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby Squire » 22 Jan 2020, 22:15

No solutions are being offered by politicians to drought and fire problems. Politicians have as yet not even acknowledged there is a problem.

There are no visionaries among current politicians. They are all selfish, greed-driven, opportunists with a time horizon no greater than the time to the next election.
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Re: Australia's raging fires create big problems for fresh w

Postby pinkeye » 22 Jan 2020, 23:09

Agree
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