Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

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Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby Squire » 27 Sep 2019, 09:00

It appears that climate change is inevitable and that the effect will be an extermination event.

The rate of change is too fast for evolution to cope. The boiling frog effect.

It appears mankind is doomed and many other species will also become extinct.

https://www.kcrw.com/news/shows/morning-edition/npr-story/755859707

Earth's Oceans Are Getting Hotter And Higher, And It's Accelerating
Written by Rebecca Hersher Sep. 25, 2019

As the world's climate changes, ocean warming is accelerating and sea levels are rising more quickly, warns a new report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The report is a synthesis of the most up-to-date climate science on oceans and ice, and it lays out a stark reality: Ocean surface temperatures have been warming steadily since 1970, and for the past 25 years or so, they've been warming twice as fast.

Sea levels are also rising increasingly quickly "due to increasing rates of ice loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets," the report states.

"For me, it's the complete picture that's kind of surprising and, frankly, concerning," says Ko Barrett, vice-chair of the U.N. panel and the deputy assistant administrator for research at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the U.S. "This is, in some ways, a report about water. Water is the lifeblood of the planet."

The report also discusses a relatively new phenomenon in the oceans: marine heat waves.

"It's sort of remarkable that prior to 2012 [or] 2013, nobody had thought about heat waves in the ocean," says Andrew Pershing, chief scientific officer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute in Portland, Maine. "And then, in 2012 we had a huge event here in the Northwest Atlantic, and the Gulf of Maine was right at the center of it. It was a real surprise."

The abnormally hot water affected animals that live off the coast of Maine, including lobster and other creatures that are crucial to the local fishing economy. What's more, it quickly became clear that the state wasn't alone.

"Subsequently, these kind of heat wave events have kind of popped up all over the ocean," Pershing says. "We've actually had three major heat waves in the Gulf of Maine — 2012, 2016 and 2018 — and now we're looking at repeat heat waves in the northern Pacific; Australia's had some repeat heat waves. So it's really becoming a part of the conversation in oceanography."

"It's kind of an emerging issue," Barrett says. "The report finds that these heat waves have doubled in frequency since the 1980s and are increasing in intensity."

That's a big deal for coastal communities whose economies rely on fish and other seafood. Marine heat waves in recent years drove a cascade of changes in marine life off the coast of the Pacific Northwest, which in turn led to disastrous seasons for commercial fishermen.

"We had two federally declared fishery disaster seasons in 2016 and 2017," says Noah Oppenheim, executive director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations. "The disaster seasons that we've experienced lately put a lot of fishermen right on the brink."

Abnormally hot water supported blooms of algae that polluted the Dungeness crab fishery on the West Coast, shutting it down for months. Meanwhile, the so-called blob of hot water off the coast was associated with drought on land, which decimated salmon runs, raised the risk of wildfires and strained water resources inland.

"Certainly, this is a phenomena we should be placing higher attention on because I think there are connections between marine heat waves and, say, weather as it impacts even the interior of continents," Barrett says.

Rising water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico have also affected weather in that region. When sea surface temperatures are unusually high, it helps fuel larger, wetter tropical storms. For example, Hurricane Harvey and Tropical Depression Imelda came inland and dropped incredible amounts of rain on Texas in the past two years.

The U.N. panel's report suggests multiple actions that local, state and national leaders can take to slow ocean warming and rising, and to adapt to its impacts. First and foremost, the authors reinforce what has been known for decades: Greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels are the main driver of changes in the world's oceans, and the global economy must undergo a dramatic transformation to reduce those emissions.

The report notes that the oceans are getting more acidic, which could lead to mass extinction of marine organisms, especially animals with shells, such as oysters and clams.

However, the report also notes that if greenhouse gas emissions are immediately and dramatically curtailed, some impacts of ocean acidification could be avoided this century.

Some marine impacts of climate change will unfold in the coming years no matter what. Accelerating sea level rise, for example, will threaten billions of people and present an existential threat to millions who live in Indigenous coastal communities that are flood-prone and rely on fishing.

"Even if we cut carbon emissions right now, we are still looking at 20 to 30 years of change," Pershing explains. "That means, no matter what we do, we have to figure out how are we going to adapt to these changes."
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby pinkeye » 28 Sep 2019, 01:09

I see they continue to propose, and urge, that WE take measures now, and there may be some hope for the future.

I think that is just an attempt to reduce the mental health issues arising from climate change. Primarily depression and anxiety. To fend off CHAOS.

Are you getting this.?

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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby HBS Guy » 02 Oct 2019, 07:48

The millennial (500-2000-year) timescale of deep-ocean ventilation affects the timescale for natural CO2 change and thus the timescale for paleo-global climate, ice sheet, and sea level changes, but this paleo-millennial timescale should not be misinterpreted as the timescale for ice sheet response to a rapid, large, human-made climate forcing. These climate feedbacks aid interpretation of events late in the prior interglacial, when sea level rose to +6-9 m with evidence of extreme storms while Earth was less than 1°C warmer than today. Ice melt cooling of the North Atlantic and Southern oceans increases atmospheric temperature gradients, eddy kinetic energy and baroclinicity, thus driving more powerful storms. The modeling, paleoclimate evidence, and ongoing observations together imply that 2°C global warming above the preindustrial level could be dangerous. Continued high fossil fuel emissions this century are predicted to yield (1) cooling of the Southern Ocean, especially in the Western Hemisphere; (2) slowing of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation, warming of the ice shelves, and growing ice sheet mass loss; (3) slowdown and eventual shutdown of the Atlantic overturning circulation with cooling of the North Atlantic region; (4) increasingly powerful storms; and (5) nonlinearly growing sea level rise, reaching several meters over a timescale of 50-150 years. These predictions, especially the cooling in the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic with markedly reduced warming or even cooling in Europe, differ fundamentally from existing climate change assessments. We discuss observations and modeling studies needed to refute or clarify these assertions.


https://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/abs/ha04710s.html

Shitload of text there.
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby Bongalong » 03 Oct 2019, 21:26

Squire wrote:It appears that climate change is inevitable and that the effect will be an extermination event.

The rate of change is too fast for evolution to cope. The boiling frog effect.

It appears mankind is doomed and many other species will also become extinct.

https://www.kcrw.com/news/shows/morning-edition/npr-story/755859707

Earth's Oceans Are Getting Hotter And Higher, And It's Accelerating
Written by Rebecca Hersher Sep. 25, 2019

As the world's climate changes, ocean warming is accelerating and sea levels are rising more quickly, warns a new report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The report is a synthesis of the most up-to-date climate science on oceans and ice, and it lays out a stark reality: Ocean surface temperatures have been warming steadily since 1970, and for the past 25 years or so, they've been warming twice as fast.

Sea levels are also rising increasingly quickly "due to increasing rates of ice loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets," the report states.

"For me, it's the complete picture that's kind of surprising and, frankly, concerning," says Ko Barrett, vice-chair of the U.N. panel and the deputy assistant administrator for research at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the U.S. "This is, in some ways, a report about water. Water is the lifeblood of the planet."

The report also discusses a relatively new phenomenon in the oceans: marine heat waves.

"It's sort of remarkable that prior to 2012 [or] 2013, nobody had thought about heat waves in the ocean," says Andrew Pershing, chief scientific officer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute in Portland, Maine. "And then, in 2012 we had a huge event here in the Northwest Atlantic, and the Gulf of Maine was right at the center of it. It was a real surprise."

The abnormally hot water affected animals that live off the coast of Maine, including lobster and other creatures that are crucial to the local fishing economy. What's more, it quickly became clear that the state wasn't alone.

"Subsequently, these kind of heat wave events have kind of popped up all over the ocean," Pershing says. "We've actually had three major heat waves in the Gulf of Maine — 2012, 2016 and 2018 — and now we're looking at repeat heat waves in the northern Pacific; Australia's had some repeat heat waves. So it's really becoming a part of the conversation in oceanography."

"It's kind of an emerging issue," Barrett says. "The report finds that these heat waves have doubled in frequency since the 1980s and are increasing in intensity."

That's a big deal for coastal communities whose economies rely on fish and other seafood. Marine heat waves in recent years drove a cascade of changes in marine life off the coast of the Pacific Northwest, which in turn led to disastrous seasons for commercial fishermen.

"We had two federally declared fishery disaster seasons in 2016 and 2017," says Noah Oppenheim, executive director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations. "The disaster seasons that we've experienced lately put a lot of fishermen right on the brink."

Abnormally hot water supported blooms of algae that polluted the Dungeness crab fishery on the West Coast, shutting it down for months. Meanwhile, the so-called blob of hot water off the coast was associated with drought on land, which decimated salmon runs, raised the risk of wildfires and strained water resources inland.

"Certainly, this is a phenomena we should be placing higher attention on because I think there are connections between marine heat waves and, say, weather as it impacts even the interior of continents," Barrett says.

Rising water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico have also affected weather in that region. When sea surface temperatures are unusually high, it helps fuel larger, wetter tropical storms. For example, Hurricane Harvey and Tropical Depression Imelda came inland and dropped incredible amounts of rain on Texas in the past two years.

The U.N. panel's report suggests multiple actions that local, state and national leaders can take to slow ocean warming and rising, and to adapt to its impacts. First and foremost, the authors reinforce what has been known for decades: Greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels are the main driver of changes in the world's oceans, and the global economy must undergo a dramatic transformation to reduce those emissions.

The report notes that the oceans are getting more acidic, which could lead to mass extinction of marine organisms, especially animals with shells, such as oysters and clams.

However, the report also notes that if greenhouse gas emissions are immediately and dramatically curtailed, some impacts of ocean acidification could be avoided this century.

Some marine impacts of climate change will unfold in the coming years no matter what. Accelerating sea level rise, for example, will threaten billions of people and present an existential threat to millions who live in Indigenous coastal communities that are flood-prone and rely on fishing.

"Even if we cut carbon emissions right now, we are still looking at 20 to 30 years of change," Pershing explains. "That means, no matter what we do, we have to figure out how are we going to adapt to these changes."

Alarmist bullshitt!
It's on...like donkey Kong: but alarmist crap is alarmist crap :bike :bike
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby pinkeye » 03 Oct 2019, 22:45

you probably live in a city. Our a large regional centre. IOW you wouldn't have a clue.
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby DonDeeHippy » 04 Oct 2019, 05:01

Bongalong wrote:larmist bullshitt!
It's on...like donkey Kong: but alarmist crap is alarmist crap

No head in sand there :rofl
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby pinkeye » 05 Oct 2019, 00:01

say Don? I like your signature.

:rose
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby DonDeeHippy » 05 Oct 2019, 05:05

pinkeye wrote:say Don? I like your signature.

:rose

Thanks a dear friend gave me a T Shirt with that on it years ago after visiting some USA reservations, Ryders sig needed a counter as well , also some members complained my house colour scheme gave them a headache :bgrin
Bongalong... for some reason women are just so superior to anything that ever existed or will ever exist!
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby pinkeye » 06 Oct 2019, 01:35

well good for you.
:bgrin
Might as well laugh yeah?
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby Bongalong » 16 Oct 2019, 18:30

pinkeye wrote:you probably live in a city. Our a large regional centre. IOW you wouldn't have a clue.

About what exactly?
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby DonDeeHippy » 03 Feb 2020, 09:03

https://cleantechnica.com/2020/02/02/ac ... ab-shells/

A new study conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) just discovered that the Pacific Ocean is so acidic that it is literally dissolving the shells off of crab larvae. This was expected, sure, but it is happening much earlier than researchers feared that it would. Our oceans absorb 30% of all the carbon dioxide that is released into the air. When the levels of the CO2 in the air increase, then so do the levels of the CO2 in the ocean (as above, so below) and this is how our oceans become acidic.

With a lower pH in the oceans waters, there will be an overgrowth of algae which will create a harder time for crustaceans and corals to form a solid shell simply because they need the carbonate ions which are not abundant in acidic waters. Oysters, clams and plankton also need these ions to survive. The NOAA believes that in order to reduce the acidity in the ocean, we need to reduce our carbon footprint — this is the only way we can slow down the increase in ocean acidification.
Even if you don't want to believe that CO2 is responsible to global warming, there is diect proof CO2 is making the ocean more acidic.... no food from the ocean will cause us lots of heartache....

Found a wonderful comment on this article as well

Lee Ramer • 2 hours ago
Impossible, all the climate deniers have told me the earth is not warming and it's impossible that us mere humans can effect any change to the planet. Must be nasty plot by those libtards using pesky science facts and reason and such along with mainstream media to dupe all of us who don't know much about science. Besides God will take care of us all.

I couldn't of said it Better :) :purple
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Re: Oceans getting hotter and higher, and it's accelerating

Postby Bongalong » 03 Feb 2020, 12:49

God Bothering banter will get everyone exactly nowhere whilst Governments themselves address God!

It's almost like nobody is actually trying - even the people pretending to be trying... like it's some kind of never ending circus.... :roll :roll
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