Melting of ice sheets and sea level rise

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Melting of ice sheets and sea level rise

Postby HBS Guy » 16 Jun 2018, 22:55

The new estimate shows there has been a six-fold increase in annual land ice contribution to global sea level rise from the mid-1990s to the early 2010s.

Land ice describes permanent ice on the surface of the Earth, which comprises the two ice sheets that cover Antarctica and Greenland as well as numerous smaller glaciers and ice caps.

Over the course of the 20th century, melting glaciers and ice caps dominated the overall contribution of land ice to global sea level rise.

This has changed over the last few decades due to the accelerating contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Ice sheets are the largest potential source of future sea level rise and represent the largest uncertainty in projections of future sea level.

This new study, to be published next week in the journal Environmental Research Letters, but already available online, suggests that for the most recent five-year period (2012-2016), land ice contributed around 1.85 mm per year to global sea level rise. The largest source was Greenland (37 percent of the total, or 0.69 mm per year) followed by glaciers and ice caps (34 percent or 0.63 mm per year). Antarctica contributed the remainder, with the vast-majority from West Antarctica (26 percent or 0.48 mm per year)


http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2018/june/land-ice-sea-level-rise.html
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Re: Melting of ice sheets and sea level rise

Postby HBS Guy » 29 Jun 2018, 00:32

Global probabilistic projections of extreme sea levels show intensification of coastal flood hazard
Michalis I. Vousdoukas, Lorenzo Mentaschi, Evangelos Voukouvalas, Martin Verlaan, Svetlana Jevrejeva, Luke P. Jackson & Luc Feyen
Nature Communicationsvolume 9, Article number: 2360 (2018) | Download Citation

Abstract

Global warming is expected to drive increasing extreme sea levels (ESLs) and flood risk along the world’s coastlines. In this work we present probabilistic projections of ESLs for the present century taking into consideration changes in mean sea level, tides, wind-waves, and storm surges. Between the year 2000 and 2100 we project a very likely increase of the global average 100-year ESL of 34–76 cm under a moderate-emission-mitigation-policy scenario and of 58–172 cm under a business as usual scenario. Rising ESLs are mostly driven by thermal expansion, followed by contributions from ice mass-loss from glaciers, and ice-sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. Under these scenarios ESL rise would render a large part of the tropics exposed annually to the present-day 100-year event from 2050. By the end of this century this applies to most coastlines around the world, implying unprecedented flood risk levels unless timely adaptation measures are taken.


https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-04692-w

The whole paper can be read.
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