My Manifesto

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My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:18

Regular readers know that one day I intend to replace our failing democracy with a new and better system of government - an enlightened dictatorship.

The position of dictator has already been allocated. To me. Some of you have already signed on to be my minions, or even henchmen. And henchwomen - I believe in equal opportunity henching.

My manifesto so far (more is added as it occurs to me):
First, we need an ethos. A definition of who we want to be. The goal of our culture and a picture of our ideals.

So, who do we want to be?

We need to be proud of our country, and of each other. And we need a country that makes us proud. Proud of working hard to achieve our goals. Valuing family and friends. Inventive and innovative. Being positive and supportive towards each other – we’re all in this together. (Well, you are. I’m running things.) Trying to make things fair – giving everyone a fair go.

We need to structure society to support and encourage those who need help, with the goal of moving them towards independence, and developing their skills and lives to the best level possible.

We need to put infrastructure in place so that everyone prepared to work will have a good life, and those who make a mistake can get back on track again.

We need to emphasise the spirit of the law rather than the letter, when there’s a conflict between justice and some narrow interpretation of the law.

It’s not about being aimless, destructive, hostile, lazy, narrow and generally miserable. We want a society where people can be happy and fulfilled.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:19

Politics and political organisation:

• Abolish states. We don't need three levels of government. Health, education and police can be run at a federal level. Services on the ground can be organised by councils. Wipe away a whole level of politicians, public servants, elections, etc - pure bliss. And local councils will have to work under greater oversight, which is badly needed in some cases. The only objection is 'what about State of Origin' and a football game isn't good enough reason to keep them. States can stay as a cultural and historical construct, but not political. In some other countries, there's states or cities with the same as our national population, so we don't need three levels of government.

• Most of the state functions - health, education, police, roads, transport, courts, licencing, etc - can be handled far better at a national level, with one system only. Far easier for people who move around if their kids don't have to cope with totally different education systems. Criminals can't disappear into another state, health information can be available faster and in a more useful way so that diseases can be monitored. Drivers can't go to another state and get a new licence when they lose too many points. And we'd save a lot of money.

• Local councils can monitor the needs of their own region, handle their normal functions and maybe a few more. Be far more accountable, and have all zoning decisions reviewed at a higher level.

• I will allow elections for local councils, and for a federal advisory council (still called parliament for ease and continuity). Anyone standing for election at any level must pass a check on their background, and all their promises will be recorded. They must deliver on what they promise within two years – that gives them time to do what they’ve promised and then move forward.

• Council and parliament are elected for a set term. They will serve the full term. Election dates will be set, every four years, and can’t be changed. If a sitting member can’t serve out their term their party can select another member to serve out their term. If they’re an independent they can appoint their successor.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:19

Law and legality:

• Justice should be fast, fair and compassionate, balancing the rights and feelings of the victim, the protection of society, and the chances of rehabilitating the offender.

• Court cases shouldn't take nearly so long to get to court. No more endless delays. It should take a few months, not a few years, so if a barrister takes a case and is too busy to do it, the case passes to someone else in their partnership. Today. And lawyers can stop all those ridiculous huge charges for answering a phone or making a photocopy, plus extra fees by spinning a case out for longer. No more.

• Two main goals of the system – to protect people, and to give offenders better tools to deal with life. Therapy and training will be given to try to help convicts turn their lives around. If they show that this isn’t going to happen, they may not be able to live freely in society.

• Rights and feelings of the victim are important. Restitution when possible can be a part of the sentence – some way to make the victim whole again, or to acknowledge that their lives were impacted.

• A jail sentence is only one option for judges. Many sentences could be more creative, with restitution, boot camp and a ‘punishment fits the crime’ approach – cleaning up graffiti, replanting and repairing vandalised areas, etc, especially for younger offenders. So many kids could be turned towards a better life, to the benefit of all. We lose too many kids to drugs and aimless violence.

• Many simple cases, and civil cases, could go to a tribunal or an adjudicator instead of a full court.

• It may need better legal jargon, but it will be recognised that ‘being an idiot’ is the cause of many crimes, and the offender isn’t a hardened criminal, they had no malice in their actions. That doesn’t mean that they did no harm, and they still have to account for that, but there’s a good chance that they’ll ort themselves out and not be a problem again. They didn’t deliberately set out to hurt anyone, or to steal or do damage, they were just….an idiot.

• A special tribunal will be set up to deal with anyone who 'falls through the cracks' of the system, or who are caught up in frustrating situations because of an unnecessary red-tape hassle of some kind. The tribunal will apply common sense instead of the letter of the law - common justice is more important than technicalities.

• Prison terms set by a judge are the minimum term and can’t be reduced. They can be extended if the prisoner is non-compliant.

• First time sentences will usually be at the lower end of the possible duration. Second time is doubled. Third time is doubled again, and if the crime was violent the sentence might be life – the person is obviously too dangerous to be free in society.

• Prisoners will be required to work, and usually undergo therapy, treatment and job training. Any days when they are non-compliant don’t count towards their sentence.

• During their sentence they will receive any therapy they need and any medical or psychological treatment. Also education and job training. There will be industries set up in the prisons so that prisoners can learn to get up, go to work and structure their day positively. Education and therapy is included in work time. They will also be encouraged to develop hobbies, skills and interests and to be involved in sports and other activities – to be busy, happy and involved. Upon release they are helped to find a job and accommodation – some may not be allowed to return to the place where they got into trouble. Hopefully many ex-convicts will say that it was the best thing that happened to them and turned their lives around. All of this is available for the first and second sentence. Third time – the sentence will be a lot longer, and the convict will have to convince assessors that they won’t re-offend, which won’t be an easy sell.

• Sex offenders are far less likely to be released, and will need to show serious improvement after heavy-duty therapy.

• Under age means exactly that, and they are off limits to adults. Saying they consented means nothing – you can play a 13, 14 or 15 year old like a piano and groom them into anything. Some exploration with their own age group may occur, but they are off limits to adults. Go find someone your own age.

• Violent offenders will need to show that they can now deal with problems without violence, can maintain a relationship without abuse, and are not a danger to the public.

• Non-violent criminals have a far better chance of changing for the better. Many of them may not need to be incarcerated – they might be able to live in halfway houses and receive therapy and training while still working and moving in society.

• There will be a classification of ‘ongoing danger to society’ – for arsonists, most sex offenders, some violent criminals – people who simply aren’t safe when walking around free. They might never be able to rejoin society again, it depends on treatment, therapy and training, but it’ll be a tough sell for release and will come with plenty of strings and oversight.

• Provocation is only a defence if the response was equivalent. ‘She said something mean to me’ doesn’t justify killing her (and that’s been used far too often in the past.)

• Halfway houses will be set up for ex-convicts who need more support to cope with life, but who can live positive lives given that extra help to stay on track.

• It will be illegal to reel around drunk or drugged in public, behaving violently or disgustingly. You don't spit, bite, swear, punch, urinate, screech, vandalise or otherwise bother people. Penalty for being irritating and out of control will be a night in the drunk tank, unless you do serious injury or damage.

• Being drunk, drugged or off meds is not a legal defence. You were sober when you made the choice to put yourself in a dangerous condition, so you are responsible for your actions. If your defence is some previous trauma or injury that makes you behave dangerously, and you can't control it, then you shouldn't be allowed out loose at all, and should be confined somewhere safely for the sake of society as a whole.

• Driving is a privilege. You have a right to try for a licence, but not a right to automatically have one. People who have issues controlling their temper, or who get constant tickets, shouldn't be driving. The points system will remain, but if you lose enough points to lose your licence more than once, the second time it's lost is at least double the first time. And double that for the next, and so on until you're basically not ever driving again.

• Driving without a licence gets a penalty of fines, etc, the first time. Jail after that, equal to half the remaining suspension time. If, after release, they drive again without the licence they go back to jail for the full length of the suspension time.

• If you commit any driving offences when you don't have a licence, the penalty is doubled.

• Fraud, as a crime, becomes theft. If someone takes your money and doesn't deliver the goods, or a builder doesn't do a job properly, or someone cheats on a contract, the police don't say it's a civil matter, they just charge the person with theft. They took money and didn't deliver what was promised. Theft.

• For theft, sentence depends on whether or not violence was used. There's a standard penalty for theft, plus more for violence or use of weapons, and then one day of jail for every $10 taken. Of course, if the criminal gives the money back, the sentence will be reduced. It's worth it for the victim to get their money back. The court can also order the criminal's possessions to be sold to reimburse the victim - the stuff was bought with stolen money, after all.

• Anyone convicted of crimes involving money can be barred from jobs where they deal with money – this especially applies to those who start companies that fail, clean out the investors and move on. They will be banned from setting up more companies, or using relatives as a front for their next criminal enterprise.

• Coward punch attacks can and have killed so the charge for them is attempted murder.

• If someone is on the ground, kicking them in the head is attempted murder.

• Paparazzi are making money from someone else’s work – the name and face of the star is their career – so any money made from their photos must be split fifty-fifty with the subject of the picture.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:20

Education:

• Education is free - up to and including university/TAFE courses. We're trying to encourage people to learn, not price them out of the system. Overseas students and non-citizens can pay, but not Australian citizens. Institutions can't have more than 10% non-citizens, as a general rule.

• Every primary school child gets a free excursion to Canberra to see parliament and the War Memorial (and all the other cool stuff in Canberra.) Every Australian should have been to Canberra and seen the heart of our government.

• A Board will give sponsorships to promising authors, musicians, performers and artists; and run various competitions, shows, galleries, etc, to get new talent up and running.

• A similar Board will fund young inventors, innovators and entrepreneurs.

• Entry to all government-owned art galleries and museums to be free for children. Heck, for everyone.

• Any child who has completed a year of training in playing a musical instrument, and has achieved some basic standard of competence, can claim a free musical instrument from the government.

• Every child who lives in the middle of the continent gets a free trip to the coast. All children should see the sea.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:21

Work, Industry & Technology:

• Apart from their normal holiday allowances, workers can nominate five days per year for religious/cultural holidays. Atheists can make their own choices.

• Everyone is entitled to a day off work on their birthday.

• A special Board will assess and possibly sponsor new inventors and inventions, forming a 50-50 partnership to get the business up and running profitably, with a 10-year buy-back option for the inventor if it's successful. We need more clever people to be encouraged. And more successful businesses.

• Phone jammers will be used in all schools, prisons, theatres, cinemas and anywhere else where phone use is dangerous or irritating. Small versions will be installed in cars, too.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:21

Transport:

• All public transport to be free.
All train and bus stations are to have large, free parking stations nearby. You can't expect people to use public transport if they can't get to it or get home again.

• Any car parked in a handicapped spot that isn't showing a handicapped tag will be towed and crushed.

• All major constructions will have large signs on them explaining what it's all about. Some do, but most don't, and it's frustrating. And they can put a timeline on it, too.

• There will be special penalties for drivers who put their right-hand indicator on AFTER they stop at a traffic light.

• We need a decent national highway system. Parts of it is ok, some of it is an absolute disgrace.

• We need a decent rail system, too. High speed connections between large cities, and far more use for goods, to get some large trucks off the roads. We went the wrong way with that, we need to correct the mistake.

• All cars will have a small jammer installed, which starts up when the engine is running, so that there's no phone calls or texting while the car is going. It's no good trying to train people, just make it impossible to use the phone while driving. Passengers will just have to put up with it, they can actually talk to each other instead.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:22

Media and communications:

• TV shows will start and end exactly when the guide says they will. I'm so tired of setting the recorder, only to lose the last few important moments.

• Ads on TV can't be repeated within the same program.

• The word 'snuck' is banned. Anyone who says 'He snuck into the room' will be stomped on severely. The word is 'sneaked'. 'Skulked' would be even better.

• News and current affairs shows are to run news and current affairs. Promos for upcoming programs on their own channel are not news stories or current affairs.

• All words used in ads must be spelled correctly. Grammar and punctuation must be correct, too.

• No cold-calling is allowed - no phone calls for charities (it's all big companies taking a huge cut of those donations anyway), insurance companies, fake Microsoft calls, etc.

• All actors in movies and TV shows are to be within 10% of the actual age of the character they're playing. I'm sick of 30-year-olds pretending to be High School kids, and setting up a lot of false standards.

• All actors in movies and TV shows are to be of the ethnicity they're playing. No more all-purpose ethnics - I'm tired of Japanese actors pretending to be Chinese, or Vietnamese, etc. Also the vaguely ethnic actors who are cast as Mexican plus assorted European plus anything else. Again, there are differences between Greek and Spanish, between Mexican and Native American, etc. It's disrespectful to think it doesn't matter. (Science fiction movies with aliens can negotiate dispensation.)

• All ads shown in this country are to be made in this country. Not just dubbed.

• Every TV station is to run at least one Oz-made children's program per day. Plus at least two Oz-made drama, comedy and documentary shows per week. Soaps, reality shows, news, current affairs and sports to continue, but we need
more quality Oz content happening. And each station can do one clever current affairs/politics shows per week too - it can be comedy-skewed or serious.

• In street scenes, crowds, offices, etc - fifty percent of extras to be female. I'm not even asking for the stars to be balanced, or for every movie to pass the Bechdel Test. Just for a realistic background. A nice range of ages and ethnicities would be good, too. (I can be flexible on this for specific cases, such as a movie set in a prison.)

• Every TV station is required to transmit at least one program a day which assumes and requires intelligence. And not transmitted at 2 in the morning.

• All those cosy agreements between publishers that keep book prices way too high in Oz are cancelled. It's bad enough that treebooks are dearer, but ridiculous that ebooks are also differently priced for us. Same goes for movies, etc.

• The government will fund a TV current affairs show that reports on all the great things kids and teens are doing. There’s so many dance and drama festivals, choirs, art competitions, sporting achievements, science competitions, and so much more, and you only hear about one if you’re involved in it personally. We need to celebrate all our amazing, talented children instead of just seeing the failures on the news.

• Ads on TV can’t show the casual death of sentient beings – even animated ones. There’s an ad now that shows a huge throat lozenge chasing a fleeing, terrified flu germ that was singing happily a moment before. It’s squashed as it cries out, and its eyeballs roll away humorously. Children shouldn’t be encouraged to laugh at cruel death, and shouldn’t think that it’s ok if the victim is from a group you don’t like.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:22

Lifestyle & Relationships:

• All instructions, especially those on food packets, are to be in a reasonable size - have you SEEN how teeny-tiny the writing on some of those packets can be?

• Related to the above, all items used in the shower are to have BIG writing on them. Take your glasses off, get in the shower, and it's enough just to find the shampoo without having to tell it apart from the identical-bottle conditioner.

• All teenagers have to do a fixed number of hours of volunteer work per week. Also participate in some form of organised sports or physical activity per week. And some form of creative activity - musical instruments, choir, dance, art, etc. Plus a scientific/technical-related hobby. The classifications can be fairly fluid, the important thing is to be doing a wide range of activities, solo and group. If they've got any free time they can do courses on life skills - cooking, repairs, common sense. Keep the little sods busy and happy, and maybe even stimulate some talent.

• This should continue into adulthood. The renaissance ideal should prevail – everyone should have hobbies that encourage sports, craft, culture, knowledge and creativity. It is understood that parents of younger children may be a little busy for all of that, and will focus their energies more on work and child rearing, but everyone is encouraged to do as much of this as possible. Helping at the child’s school covers a lot. Older and retired people will have more time, and can include more voluntary work as well. Yes, it keeps everyone busy. That’s a good thing.

• Before marriage, couples are required to make a prenuptial agreement - there'll be a standard version, but couples can make modifications if they wish. It will be legally binding. It will be set up to cover all foreseeable situations, so if the couple divorces it should be an easier process, with less to fight about.

• Before marriage, couples are required to make a will. Every adult should have a will, and it should be updated regularly, as part of each milestone in life.

• In the case of divorce, the first priority is that children of the relationship are protected - they need a secure home and a good education. Once that is organised, the couple can sort out the rest - the prenup should cover most of it.

• You have a right to leave your property how you choose. Wills can't be challenged unless there's real suspicion of interference. Valid wills, especially for the elderly, will need a solicitor to oversee the process, and to keep the original, so that some random carer can't make Great-Uncle Freddy change his will, and can't forge one after he's gone.

• If someone is having an affair, the lover can't challenge their will. They knew the person was married, they knew they were a bit on the side, they got some pretty presents out of it, that's their lot.

• Any parent who is paying child support has a right to have a DNA check that the child is their own. Just to put their mind at rest.

• Children have a right to see both parents. If one parent is making access visits difficult, the custody will be reversed, and the child will go to live with the other parent.

• One of the biggest sources of friction is money, of course. One parent can be bitterly resentful at, as they see it, having to support their ex and his/her new partner. In general, nobody should have to support an ex, as most adults are capable of supporting themselves. And resources would be split between the couple - the ratio depending on time married, input from each, what they brought to the relationship, etc. (Set out in the prenup, mostly.) So the main ongoing payments are for children. One way to deal with that is that the custodial parent will cover food, shelter and incidentals, while the non-custodial parent covers education, extra classes, clubs, sport, other activities, uniforms, equipment, etc. Three ways to manage it - a) the money is paid directly to the school, club, etc. The non-cus parent takes the child shopping for the uniforms, in some cases the other parent buys the things and the non-cus parent pays when given the receipts. b) A set amount is paid into a trust fund, administered by the court, to pay as required. c) both parents act like sensible adults and deal sensibly with each other.

• During a divorce, settlements previously paid to one partner as compensation for injuries remain solely in the possession of the injured party.

• Also during divorce proceedings, anything inherited from relatives remains the sole property of the heir to that property, or it is settled in all or part on any children of the marriage. It stays in the family.

• As I've said, nothing is perfect. Mediators will help a divorcing couple sort themselves out, and can try to settle situations as fairly as possible.

• Seasonal products such as Easter eggs, hot cross buns and Christmas foods can't be sold until six weeks before the event. (I will allow Ymas mid-year as well.)

• All stairs must have a handrail.

• Hostel accommodation will be built for the homeless, where they can stay until they’re able to move on and rebuild their lives, or stay there where they have a place to live, food, and access to health services. No Australian should be homeless.

• Organ donation upon death isn’t ‘opt-in’ or ‘opt-out’. It’s just part of the process. Once you’re gone, if someone can use some of the spare parts they’re welcome to them – how wonderful to think that you can still do good work in the world even after you die. Families could be told that their loved one saved three lives, let a blind person see, etc – it may give some small comfort.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 01:23

Welfare and Funding

• It’s a security net, not a security blanket. Welfare funding will support those who need help, but it’s not a lifestyle option. The goal is to help in a crisis and then get people back on their feet and independent, and to support those who can’t achieve that to the highest level they can reach.

• The expectation is always there that everyone works. Jobs, voluntary work, school – whatever it is, it’s your job. It’s nobody else’s job to support you forever. Going on the dole is an emergency measure, not a lifestyle choice. And being on welfare forever erodes self-respect and independence, it makes you so much less in society. People should be proud of themselves and what they do, they should feel a part of things, and have meaning in their lives.

• Citizens are eligible for the dole after they’ve worked and paid taxes for a year.

• The dole cuts out after three months. Those who still don’t have a job will be given options from the jobs available, even if it’s not the exact position the person wanted. After three months on the dole the person isn’t eligible for more payments for the next 12 months.

• Job seekers can be given training to improve their skills, which may extend the time on benefits. If they are being funded to do a course they must turn up on time each day and do the coursework, or lose funding and dole for twelve months.

• If there is no suitable job available, the job seeker can do voluntary work of some kind and remain on the dole. Plenty of older workers who can’t find a job could do Meals on Wheels, be hospital volunteers, etc. But it has to be for the same hours as a full job, not a few hours a week, and the person must be there on time, and do it well.

• While on the dole the person must turn up at 9:00 at a designated location, usually the Centrelink office, and remain there until 5:00, unless sent out on job interviews. Failure to turn up on time means benefits are docked. Three days off without good reason means loss of benefits.

• For handicapped benefits, government doctors will assess the level of problem. Sheltered workshops will be set up where many benefit recipients can work a few days a week, or even a few hours. This isn’t just to force them to work – it gives them a group of friends, there can be therapy and information sessions at the workshop, and carers can have a little time off. The wellbeing of the person can also be monitored to check that they’re being cared for properly. Besides, you need to get out of the house sometimes, if it’s at all possible.

• Respite care, mental health facilities and drug treatment centres. We need plenty of them.

• Hostels will be set up for homeless families. No child should be homeless. They can get themselves sorted out, get jobs and places to live, and move on when they’re ready. But no child sleeps in a car, or moves from one temporary place to another every few days – they have no security, and can’t get to school properly.

• Housing Commission homes are given for five years, after which you move on, buy the place, or the rent increases to market level. Five years gives you time to get sorted and cope. Those who need more support will be helped, but always with the expectation and knowledge that they have to get their act together.

• All overseas funding will be re-diverted to Australian health and medical systems, education systems, roads, and all the other good things listed above, until they’re up to speed.

• Non-citizens are eligible for welfare benefits if they’ve worked and paid taxes in this country for two years.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby HBS Guy » 24 May 2016, 09:32

Re those on dole—what if there aren’t jobs, like now?
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 24 May 2016, 16:30

HBS Guy wrote:Re those on dole—what if there aren’t jobs, like now?


I covered that - they can do volunteer work, and remain on the dole.

The thing is, people need to do something, it's part of their identity and their self-respect. Volunteer work is important and necessary, it teaches skills, it gives the person a circle of friends, and it gets them out of the house. It teaches them to be in the right place at the right time and to structure their lives that way - so many unemployed people have their energy and hope leeched away, they lose motivation.

There needs to be an assumption that all fit, working-age people will work. Job, volunteer - doesn't matter, the important thing is to be doing something, to have an identity and a purpose. Going on the dole isn't a lifestyle, it should be a safety net until you get something, not your life.

I've worked with kids from families where every adult is on some kind of benefit - the kids were third generation welfare. Those kids had never seen anyone get up, get ready and head off to work, they simply had no concept of it. If you asked them what they wanted to do and be when they left school they really had no answer, they had no idea that you were supposed to anything. They were also very passive, they assumed that anything they needed would be provided for them, they had no agency in their own lives. It was sad, seeing them being wasted like that - we need to do better for our children.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby HBS Guy » 24 May 2016, 17:20

Yup, volunteer jobs fine but on minimum pay, super and workcover and real training etc.

Some are bludgers—I know, used to rent rooms to them—so let them bludge and not spoil it for the people who can be helped.
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 25 May 2016, 00:17

HBS Guy wrote:Yup, volunteer jobs fine but on minimum pay, super and workcover and real training etc.

Some are bludgers—I know, used to rent rooms to them—so let them bludge and not spoil it for the people who can be helped.



I agree - the goal is to help as many as possible, and to make work the norm, not welfare. So many people just need a bit of a boost to get their lives going well - we don't want to waste them.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Aussienan » 09 Jun 2016, 18:18

Gwynne for PM do I get a second on that?
If It Aint Broke Don't Fix It.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby HBS Guy » 09 Jun 2016, 19:27

Sounds good to me!
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Cherie » 10 Jun 2016, 23:11

Gwynne wrote:
HBS Guy wrote:Yup, volunteer jobs fine but on minimum pay, super and workcover and real training etc.

Some are bludgers—I know, used to rent rooms to them—so let them bludge and not spoil it for the people who can be helped.



I agree - the goal is to help as many as possible, and to make work the norm, not welfare. So many people just need a bit of a boost to get their lives going well - we don't want to waste them.



Great post.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Aussienan » 15 Jun 2016, 18:32

Gwynne I'd like you to write a new manifesto for the govt how about adding one don't be jerks.
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby Gwynne » 17 Jun 2016, 15:48

Ohhh yes. Well, I want to set up a tribunal to deal with people who've fallen through the cracks of the system, or who feel that they've had a rough deal. I also want to cut out a lot of red tape, and streamline procedures when dealing with government departments and the court system.

And decisions should be, whenever possible, positive and kind.

Politicians will be held to their promises just like businesses - it's false advertising if they promise and don't deliver. And in their case it would be fraud on a national scale, millions of people cheated - ohhhh just imagine the sentencing!

That should get things onto a better footing!
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Re: My Manifesto

Postby MilesAway » 13 Dec 2017, 16:59

Gwynne wrote:Regular readers know that one day I intend to replace our failing democracy with a new and better system of government - an enlightened dictatorship.

The position of dictator has already been allocated. To me. Some of you have already signed on to be my minions, or even henchmen. And henchwomen - I believe in equal opportunity henching.

My manifesto so far (more is added as it occurs to me):
First, we need an ethos. A definition of who we want to be. The goal of our culture and a picture of our ideals.

So, who do we want to be?

We need to be proud of our country, and of each other. And we need a country that makes us proud. Proud of working hard to achieve our goals. Valuing family and friends. Inventive and innovative. Being positive and supportive towards each other – we’re all in this together. (Well, you are. I’m running things.) Trying to make things fair – giving everyone a fair go.

We need to structure society to support and encourage those who need help, with the goal of moving them towards independence, and developing their skills and lives to the best level possible.

We need to put infrastructure in place so that everyone prepared to work will have a good life, and those who make a mistake can get back on track again.

We need to emphasise the spirit of the law rather than the letter, when there’s a conflict between justice and some narrow interpretation of the law.

It’s not about being aimless, destructive, hostile, lazy, narrow and generally miserable. We want a society where people can be happy and fulfilled.

You say that first we need an ethos!

Well if you’re asking your pretend friends for the plan to be their leader then you’re drinking metho all alone buddy!

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Re: My Manifesto

Postby MilesAway » 13 Dec 2017, 17:00

Gwynne wrote:Ohhh yes. Well, I want to set up a tribunal to deal with people who've fallen through the cracks of the system, or who feel that they've had a rough deal. I also want to cut out a lot of red tape, and streamline procedures when dealing with government departments and the court system.

And decisions should be, whenever possible, positive and kind.

Politicians will be held to their promises just like businesses - it's false advertising if they promise and don't deliver. And in their case it would be fraud on a national scale, millions of people cheated - ohhhh just imagine the sentencing!

That should get things onto a better footing!

You ain’t got a system: you want to borrow someone else’s do you?

Perhaps steal it from them?

You’re an anarchist ... deal with it!
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