Peter Slipper resigns as Speaker

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Peter Slipper resigns as Speaker

Postby HBS Guy » 09 Oct 2012, 20:19

Don’t think it matters, Slipper will have no love for the LNP.

This thing with Ashby is pretty grubby stuff—by the LNP.

Slipper is kind of a flawed human being but a brilliant Speaker which is what Abbott & Pyne etc hated, they wanted chaos in QT to make it look like the government was in chaos and no chance of that with Slipper in the chair.

The LNP were opportunistic grubs today, Abbott really is beyond the pale.

Destroying the Joint ‏@SpaceKidette

Today we came within one vote of creating a precedent of which would have destroyed the principle of Separation of State. #auspol

Destroying the Joint ‏@SpaceKidette

Today we came within one vote of turning our parliament into an official Kangaroo Court. #auspol

Destroying the Joint ‏@SpaceKidette

Today we came within one vote of destroying a man's life and livelihood based on the hysteria whipped up by elected MP's of this country.

Destroying the Joint ‏@SpaceKidette

Today we came within one vote of destroying democracy in this country.

Destroying the Joint ‏@SpaceKidette

Today, we came within one vote of destroying my belief in the principles that have guided this country. #sad #verysad
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
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Re: Peter Slipper resigns as Speaker

Postby HBS Guy » 10 Oct 2012, 14:24

IA gives an account of the resignation of the Speaker and the Ashby allegations etc:

http://www.independentaustralia.net/201 ... t-slipper/
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Re: Peter Slipper resigns as Speaker

Postby HBS Guy » 10 Oct 2012, 14:38

Turnbull showed his disgust at the SSSO Tone got up to move, sat straight up, slightly turned away from Tone.

Pffft, so fucking what? Resign from the Libs, become an Indie, have some real weight in Parliament. He will never be chosen as Leader again. Next year he can leave Parliament and enjoy his wealth. His Party will sink further into the mire as it heads ever further right. He is supposed to be the white hope of moderate Libs and even of Labor supporters looking for a reasonable, civil Liberal Party. He is betraying them and his moderate status by remaining in the Liberal party.
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Re: Peter Slipper resigns as Speaker

Postby HBS Guy » 10 Oct 2012, 19:05

Hah! Overseas coverage of the “bad ass motherfucker” Gillard ripping Abbott a new one and social media has forced local media to report this coverage. The SMH too forced by comments to articles. hartcher just didn’t get what happened.

It is a different world, social media can and has held people to account that thought they were invulnerable due to their position in the old media. Next election social media will have a big role to play.
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Re: Peter Slipper resigns as Speaker

Postby HBS Guy » 10 Oct 2012, 23:07

MSM, typically, missed that Gillard’s brilliant speech was the story. No surprises there.

MSM, typically, missed what the whole debate was about even tho it was spelled out very clearly by Labor MP Daryl Menham:

The debate before the House today is a very serious debate because precedents will be forged as a result of it. It has to be taken seriously.
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What we are dealing with is a civil charge where the Speaker is contesting it as an abuse of process and the judge has reserved. The opposition want us to come in and adjudicate. I say to the crossbenchers—because I think they are the ones who will determine this debate—that that is a very dangerous precedent.
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The thing that is most disturbing is the other procedures. I used to be on the Privileges Committee and I have been on the Procedure Committee; I understand some of the history of this case. I remember the case of Fitzpatrick and Browne, who this parliament put in jail for three months in 1955. At least Fitzpatrick and Browne addressed the bar of the House. Where is the procedural fairness in this shonky motion? This is a Speaker who is absent, who does not have the opportunity to have someone address on his behalf, in a situation where the numbers are depleted because he has voluntarily not taken his place in the House, which was his decision alone.
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I am not here to endorse private text messages. A judge of the Federal Court will adjudicate on what they constitute. I say: what if it were me? How would I want it adjudicated? Is this the way we are going to administer justice—hang, draw and quarter someone? It is not because we are impartial. Let’s be very clear, the vote will be a partisan vote as far as the opposition is concerned. As far as the government is concerned it is not on independent grounds—we do not know what the Speaker’s answers to some of these allegations are. We do not get, ‘We’re going to put this on the table to give an opportunity for this matter to be considered and dealt with later on,’ but rather it gets brought on for debate. This is a very dangerous precedent.
I can understand some members having particular concerns, but this is not about Mr Slipper. This is about principles.
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We have a situation where the judgement is reserved, so it is not a question of sub judice. I am not arguing sub judice per se. I am arguing a separation of powers. This is a civil matter where this parliament is entitled as a matter of course to have the judge’s determination in front of it before it makes a decision in relation to the Speaker. Any bozo can see that, except the lynch mob, who have a political purpose.
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I do not say that the parliament does not have a right to remove him. That is not my argument. I am saying to you: before you proceed down that path, let the cards fall where they are going to fall in a Federal court. It may well be that the Federal Court gives you the ammunition for him to go voluntarily without being voted out by the House. I believe that that option adds further dignity to the House.
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This motion is not dignified. To pull on a motion without notice where the Speaker’s support is one vote down because he is not in the chair is not a true representation of this parliament. Be very careful, be very cautious, because I for one did not like what the parliament did back in 1955 when it sent people to jail for three months. But what it did have which we do not have was a conscience vote—not a vote on party lines to remove a Speaker. I am not arguing for a conscience vote, but I am re-emphasising the point I made to you earlier that we are involved in a party political debate which has ramifications for how this parliament is seen by those outside and by parliaments around the world. I say to the Independents: you will have an opportunity in the near future, I assume, to exercise your judgement if you have doubts, but today is not the day. I say that in all sincerity, because the position is that we have to get this right.

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The difficulty here is that we each need to be very careful. I know we can engage in the theatre of a debate, but this actually has quite serious ramifications. I believe I have raised some fundamental issues which show that in proceeding to a vote today is flawed. Do not be too smart by half. These principles are bigger than Slipper; they are bigger than anyone in this chamber. We have a duty to maintain the dignity of this chamber. I do not believe the dignity of this chamber would be maintained if we removed the Speaker without him having an opportunity to present a case to us without a full complement of the House, without the wisdom of the Federal Court’s judgement in relation to the matter that is currently before him. I say: do not persist with this at this point of time. Leave it on the table and allow it to stand there. We revisit it when his honour delivers his judgement in the Federal Court case.

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/sea ... %2F0000%22

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