Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

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Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby mothra » 18 Apr 2018, 16:31

US: Russia Hacked The Evidence Of Chemical Attack In Syria

We are now being told (and I assure you I am not making this up) that if the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons doesn’t find evidence that the Syrian government conducted a chemical weapons attack in Douma last week, it’s because Russia hid the evidence.

“It is our understanding the Russians may have visited the attack site,” reports U.S. Ambassador Kenneth Ward. “It is our concern that they may have tampered with it with the intent of thwarting the efforts of the OPCW Fact-Finding Mission to conduct an effective investigation.”

I guess the idea is that this international top-level investigative team on which tremendous credibility has been placed by the western world can be thwarted by Russians showing up with a Hoover and spraying some Febreze in the air like a teenage stoner when mom comes home? I’m not sure, but given the immense dearth of evidence we’ve been seeing in support of the establishment Douma narrative and the mounting pile of evidence contradicting it, it sure does sound fishy.

Now that the jihadist-occupied suburb of Douma has been retaken by the Syrian government, western journalists have been allowed in to poke around and start asking questions, and so far it isn’t looking great for the propaganda machine.

The Independent‘s Robert Fisk has published a report which affirms the story so many westerners have been dismissing as Kremlin propaganda for days now after interviewing a doctor from the hospital of the area where the Douma attack was supposed to have occurred. Dr Assim Rahaibani told Fisk that what was in actuality an outbreak of respiratory distress among occupants of a dusty oxygen-deprived tunnel was made to look like the aftereffects of a chemical weapons attack when a member of the White Helmets started shouting about a gas attack in front of a bunch of video cameras. Everyone panicked and started hosing themselves down, but in the video, according to Rahaibani, “what you see are people suffering from hypoxia – not gas poisoning.”

This report was independently backed up by a reporter from One America News Network named Pearson Sharp, who gave a detailed account of his interviews with officials, doctors, as well as many civilians on the street Sharp says he deliberately selected at random in order to avoid accusations of bias. Many people hadn’t even heard that a chemical weapons attack had taken place, and the ones who had said it was staged by Jaysh al-Islam. The staff at the hospital, including a medic-in-training who was an eyewitness to the incident, gave the same story as the account in Fisk’s report.

The increasing confidence with which these unapproved narratives are being voiced and the increasing discomfort being exhibited by empire loyalists like Ambassador Ward indicate a weakening narrative in the greater propaganda campaign against the Assad government and its allies, but don’t hold your breath for the part where Fox News and the BBC turn around and start asking critical questions of the governments that they are meant to be holding to account.

The journalists who have been advancing the establishment narrative on Syria aren’t about to start reporting that they’ve gotten the entire Syria story assballs backward and have been promoting a version of events manufactured for the benefit of CIA-MI6-Mossad agendas. You’re not about to see CNN, who last year staged a fake scripted interview with a seven year-old Syrian girl to manufacture support for escalations against Assad, suddenly turn around and start asking if we’re being told the full story about what’s happening Syria.

Watch them closely. Watch how they steadfastly ignore the growing mountain of evidence and keep promoting the Syrian regime change agenda that the western empire has been working toward for decades. Watch them dismiss all evidence they can’t ignore as Kremlin propaganda and shift the narrative whenever things start to look bad for them. Those riding the crest of the wave of establishment media are too far gone into the blob to ever admit error and change. The least among us aren’t about to stop constructing a public reality tunnel which depicts them as heroes of truth, tear it all down, and start advancing a narrative which makes them look like fools at best and villains at worst. It will not happen.

Luckily for us, it doesn’t need to. Internet censorship is still far from closing the door on our ability to network and share information, and we’ve been very effective at sowing skepticism among the masses. The war propagandists are not nearly as good at their jobs as they want to believe, and we can beat them.

They work so hard to manufacture support for war because they require that consent. If the oligarchs try to launch a war against a disobedient nation amidst very clear opposition from the public, they will shatter the illusion of freedom and democracy that their entire empire is built upon, and then they’re exposed. Corporatist oligarchy has succeeded in weaving its web of dominance because its oppression has thus far remained hidden and its depravity disguised as humanitarianism. They cannot expose themselves by transgressing a loud NO from the public or else the masses will realize that everything they used to believe about their country, their government and their world is a lie.

They won’t risk that. We can force them into retreating from open war by circulating facts and information and keeping a healthy level of skepticism circulating among the public. Watch them squirm, move goalposts and shift narratives, and point and yell about it whenever it happens. We can win the media war against the propagandists. We have truth on our side.

https://caitlinjohnstone.com/2018/04/17/us-russia-hacked-the-evidence-of-chemical-attack-in-syria/
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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby mothra » 18 Apr 2018, 16:32

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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby Dax » 18 Apr 2018, 20:05

Funny things go on in every war, you can never believe what the media tells you, many are controlled in what they can release within their countries. Chemicals and every barbaric way ever conceived is used in war and always will. This bullshit about humanitarian rules of war, is pathetically dumb. What's the difference between bombing, shooting, gassing, poisoning or blowing up. Look at torture, flame throwers, napalm and phosphorous, all used by all sides who claimed legitimacy. They all result in the same outcome and when you sit back and think about it, they all provide relatively the same amount of pain and suffering.

It's a good article, reflects pretty well the conditions and psychological state of those involved. Not a nice situation to be in for anyone, especially non combatants.
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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 01:07

it is the children, the women, and the elderly that pay that price.

as you say.. the non-combatants.

And yes, this is nothing new in human war upon other humans.

No wonder the aliens have proscribed our planet as non- contactable. Banned.!!

Nope, they really don't want us out there. :roll
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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby Dax » 20 Apr 2018, 19:58

It's everyone that suffers in these wars, including animals. Urban guerrilla war effects everyone, normally it's less than 10% of the population involved and many of those are forced by necessity, not choice.

War is an abdominal approach to evolution, but it's the population who in the beginning, give these deranged imbeciles power in every country or culture. We're a pretty sick species, why would any species want to wipe themselves out when it would be so easy to have reasonable peace and harmony through out their cultures.

Our closest neighbours are known to have planetary systems and the new space telescope they launched in the last day or so. Will be many times more powerful than the Hubble telescope which has found hundreds of planets, So intelligent life would reside within the universe, along with unintelligent life, like ideological humans,

They make the chemical weapons in the first place, manufacture and supply to all sides the weapons of war. It's an economic gold mine the war industry, it props up man big corporations and governments.
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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 21:48

Dax wrote:It's everyone that suffers in these wars, including animals. Urban guerrilla war effects everyone, normally it's less than 10% of the population involved and many of those are forced by necessity, not choice.

War is an abdominal approach to evolution, but it's the population who in the beginning, give these deranged imbeciles power in every country or culture. We're a pretty sick species, why would any species want to wipe themselves out when it would be so easy to have reasonable peace and harmony through out their cultures.

Our closest neighbours are known to have planetary systems and the new space telescope they launched in the last day or so. Will be many times more powerful than the Hubble telescope which has found hundreds of planets, So intelligent life would reside within the universe, along with unintelligent life, like ideological humans,

They make the chemical weapons in the first place, manufacture and supply to all sides the weapons of war. It's an economic gold mine the war industry, it props up man big corporations and governments.



Quite so.

Couple of years ago I started a topic in the 'other' place... about other intelligent life in the universe.
And I'm not the first.

It seemed no-one was prepared to agree other intelligent ( :roll ) life existed in the universe. There was some guarded opinions... allowing the possibility, in general. Some were outraged.

I found it all amusing, and surprising. I pointed out the sheer numbers of other planets etc.

My final argument FOR there being other intelligent life in the Universe, was just the one FACT:

WE EXIST.
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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 21:49

oops.. but probably not for long. In galactic terms.. a heartbeat.
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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby Dax » 21 Apr 2018, 12:53

pinkeye wrote:
Dax wrote:It's everyone that suffers in these wars, including animals. Urban guerrilla war effects everyone, normally it's less than 10% of the population involved and many of those are forced by necessity, not choice.

War is an abdominal approach to evolution, but it's the population who in the beginning, give these deranged imbeciles power in every country or culture. We're a pretty sick species, why would any species want to wipe themselves out when it would be so easy to have reasonable peace and harmony through out their cultures.

Our closest neighbours are known to have planetary systems and the new space telescope they launched in the last day or so. Will be many times more powerful than the Hubble telescope which has found hundreds of planets, So intelligent life would reside within the universe, along with unintelligent life, like ideological humans,

They make the chemical weapons in the first place, manufacture and supply to all sides the weapons of war. It's an economic gold mine the war industry, it props up man big corporations and governments.



Quite so.

Couple of years ago I started a topic in the 'other' place... about other intelligent life in the universe.
And I'm not the first.

It seemed no-one was prepared to agree other intelligent ( :roll ) life existed in the universe. There was some guarded opinions... allowing the possibility, in general. Some were outraged.

I found it all amusing, and surprising. I pointed out the sheer numbers of other planets etc.

My final argument FOR there being other intelligent life in the Universe, was just the one FACT:

WE EXIST.


Throughout my life, have believed their is alien life and everyone I associate with has thought the same. Our closest neighbour, the Centauri trio of stars is the one I've been looking at as long as I can remember and all have planetary systems in the comfort zone. It's not unreasonable to assume that's where many of our UFO's originate, their technology would probably not be restricted by ideological stupidity and fear.
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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby pinkeye » 21 Apr 2018, 21:52

Personally I have no doubt about the reality of extra-terrestrial intelligent life.

It seems ludicrous to me that people still consider themselves the only intelligence in the frikkin' UNIVERSE. :WTF

I think this blindness is based on the religious idea that we are created in his like, and are blessed of his favour.

I mean seriously...? if anything shows how willing we as humans are, to bury our heads in the sand and, to pretend everything will be fine in the end , it IS RELIGION.

Oh well.. :roll

That isn't on topic. Oh well :roll i s'pose evryone does it... :yak yak
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Re: Funny business with Syrian chemical attack

Postby mothra » 24 Apr 2018, 13:13

Yes, Syria’s Assad regime is brutal. But the retaliatory air strikes are illegal and partisan

The mainstream media have broadly accepted the justifications from the United States, France and Britain of humanitarian motivation for the retaliatory strikes against Bashar al-Assad’s Syrian regime.

Journalist Adam Johnson analysed US mainstream coverage and reported that:

major publications take the bulk of the premises for war for granted — namely the US’s legal and moral right to wage it — and simply parse over the details.

The air strike proceeded without publication of proof that Syria was responsible for the alleged atrocity in Douma. Reports are emerging that cast doubt on the official narrative.

Regardless, swift action was demanded and taken. Inspectors from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons are only now gaining access “to establish facts around the allegations of chemical weapons use in Douma”.

Strikes illegal under international law

Alongside claims for justification from the Trump administration, similar rhetoric featured in statements from French and British leaders. French President Emmanuel Macron claimed there was no doubt Syria was responsible for a chemical attack on civilians, in gross violation of international law. He said:

We cannot tolerate the trivialisation of chemical weapons, which is an immediate danger for the Syrian people and our collective security.

British Prime Minister Theresa May agreed, saying “we cannot allow the erosion of the international norm that prevents the use of these weapons”. May identified the lack of consensus in the UN Security Council as a driving factor in the joint military action.

Even this week the Russians vetoed a resolution at the UN Security Council which would have established an independent investigation into the Douma attack. So there is no practicable alternative to the use of force to degrade and deter the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian regime.

The United Nations Charter contains a prohibition on the threat or use of force against another state. Exceptions to this rule of international law are tightly constrained:

Under Article 51 of the Charter, states retain a right to individual and collective self-defence in the case of an armed attack.

Under Chapter VII of the Charter, the Security Council may authorise military force to restore international peace and security, if non-forceful measures have failed.


The British government has published a brief asserting the legality of the air strike on Syria as an exercise of “humanitarian intervention” (effectively invoking the doctrine of the “Responsibility to Protect” or R2P, without explicitly mentioning it).

The argument is that the UK and its allies were entitled to use force against Syria because:

there was convincing evidence of large-scale and extreme humanitarian distress;
there was no practicable alternative to using force in order to save lives; and
the use of force in response was proportionate and time-limited to relieve humanitarian suffering.
Yet the R2P doctrine does not establish a new legal basis for the use of force. It allows for the use of force as “humanitarian intervention” only within the provisions of Chapter VII of the Charter, in the case of grave international crimes.

The Labour opposition in the UK has released its own legal opinion, sharply contradicting the government and asserting that the strikes were illegal.

Illegal but legitimate?
The allies responsible for this week’s air strike have not claimed explicit authorisation under the Charter. Instead, their aim has been to establish the legitimacy of the strike. This approach was endorsed by the European Union and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

According to President Trump:

The nations of Britain, France, and the United States of America have marshalled their righteous power against barbarism and brutality.

The Assad regime cannot be absolved of its brutality. Indeed, it is a fundamental objective of the post-second world war international legal order to save humanity from the “scourge of war” and promote human rights.

And there can be little doubt that the international legal system is far from perfect, having failed to protect populations around the world from gross violations of humanitarian and human rights law.

In Syria, hundreds of thousands have been killed over seven years of civil war, and millions are now refugees or internally displaced. The complexity of the conflict has seen monitors cease to estimate a death toll.

However, efforts to establish an alternative foundation for military action, beyond what is currently legal, pose risks that must be grappled with.

If states are permitted to determine when force is warranted, outside the existing legal framework, the legitimacy of that framework may be fatally undermined. How could any consistency of response be ensured? By what standard will states distinguish between benevolent and “rogue” regimes?

Leader of the UK opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, challenged Prime Minister May on these grounds:

Does the humanitarian crisis in Yemen entitle other countries to arrogate to themselves the right to bomb Saudi positions in Yemen, given their use of cluster bombs and white phosphorous?

It is relevant in this context that Saudi Arabia is a highly valued client of the British arms industry. According to War Child UK, total sales to the kingdom have topped £6 billion since the conflict in Yemen began. The UK has refused to support a proposed UN inquiry into allegations of Saudi war crimes in Yemen.

Meanwhile, crimes against humanity and gross human rights violations are alleged against Myanmar, the Philippines and Israel, among other states, without attracting the kind of “humanitarian intervention” undertaken in Syria.



Jeremy Corbyn has made the case for diplomacy as the only reasonable way forward. Syria should not be a war theatre in which the agendas of external actors take precedence, he argues.

The US has long envisaged regime change in Syria, and stepped up sponsorship of opposition groups since 2009.

Read more: How the aid community responds in Syria will dictate its role in future crises

Robert Kennedy Jr. traced the history of US intervention in Syria from the first CIA involvement in 1949. He argues that this is another oil war, and says of broader interventionism in the Middle East:

The only winners have been the military contractors and oil companies that have pocketed historic profits, the intelligence agencies that have grown exponentially in power and influence to the detriment of our freedoms and the jihadists who invariably used our interventions as their most effective recruiting tool.

Central to US strategic thinking is the relationship between Syria and Iran. US Ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, seemed to say that a condition for US withdrawal is that Iran cease to function as an ally of Syria.

With the US gaze so firmly fixed on Iran and Russia, the rationale for “humanitarian intervention” can and should be more firmly critiqued.


https://theconversation.com/yes-syrias-assad-regime-is-brutal-but-the-retaliatory-air-strikes-are-illegal-and-partisan-95140
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