If we had an NBN

Discuss politics and current affairs here.

Hot topic: The scourge of negative gearing, Friends of the NBN and wrecking lives.  The economy and Poll tracking— all the polls. New! ELECTION 2016, Issues and Leaders

Special Feature 1: Peter Costello and our current deficits.
Special Feature 2: Dr Turnbull and the wrong NBN prescription
Special Feature 3: The Denigration of science, technology and education.
.
Forum rules
The rules for this board are in the Charter of Moderation. Politics is for serious discussion of politics, economics and current affairs.

If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 02 Aug 2016, 20:06

We could (we being us, business, local/state/commonwealth govt) do something like this:

https://www.us-ignite.org/apps/

But we don’t, courtesy of braindead Libs, have an NBN.

We do have lots of cabinets of obsolete electrical crap, many of which will be flooded. Oh joy, all hail the mighty Libs!
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 02 Aug 2016, 20:34

More:

http://www.cisco.com/c/m/en_us/never-better/core-networking.html

Notice Adelaide gets a guernsey?


Hmmmm to do with this:
http://investadelaide.com.au/why-adelaide/adelaide-smart-city/what-is-already-happening

Good, keep going!

There are railways/railways easements all over the state, running fibre to regional centres will be a doddle. Unfortunately, probably not to residences.
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 27 Aug 2016, 09:45

Hmmmm from a ZDNet email just now the stinking Libs have cut the HFC area by 13% or 1.2m premises.

WTF? DOCSIS 3.1. would give 1Gbps duplex (assuming the (HFC) nodes don’t serve too many subscribers which I suspect they will) whereas “100/40 FTTN” only gives 12/1 once all lines in an area are cut over. There is no CAPEX or cost per premises reason for downgrading from DOCSIS.

Just another fuckup within the whole MTM mess.

YOUR connection to Australia’s National Broadband Network may be downgraded before it even arrives at your home after the company behind the major infrastructure project backflipped on technology again.

NBN Co today revealed as many as 1.5 million homes and businesses would no longer receive upgrades to cable internet connections after the work proved costlier than it anticipated.

http://paper.li/krONik/1306144481?read=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.news.com.au%2Ftechnology%2Fmore-australians-to-get-slower-nbn-connections-after-company-ditches-some-cable-upgrades%2Fnews-story%2F6448d5406f36e4d9dc9d9e0c87a7a0be



400,000 less FTTH connections too so nearly 2 million more premises on FTTN which is no better than ADSL2 FFS!
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 04 Nov 2016, 08:15

New Blog: Another look at Fraudband:

https://t.co/Lpe96fYvWT
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 12 Nov 2016, 05:31

This is a town, Chattanooga that built itself a real internet, gigabits per second:

The first thing you see at the Chattanooga airport is a giant sign that says “Welcome to Gig City.” There are advertisements and flyers and billboards for the Gig in the city’s public parks. The city’s largest building is dedicated to the Gig. Years before Google Fiber, Chattanooga was the first city in the United States to have a citywide gigabit-per-second fiber internet network. And the city’s government built it itself.

At a time when small cities, towns, and rural areas are seeing an exodus of young people to large cities and a precipitous decline in solidly middle class jobs, the Gig has helped Chattanooga thrive and create a new identity for itself.

It’s an internet boomtown, and Chattanooga has turned itself from what could have been another failing mid-sized city into a startup hub that’s filling up with exiles from Manhattan, San Francisco, and Austin. [My emphasis.]

Chattanooga and many of the other 82 other cities and towns in the United States that have thus far built their own government-owned, fiber-based internet are held up as examples for the rest of the country to follow. Like the presence of well-paved roads, good internet access doesn’t guarantee that a city will be successful. But the lack of it guarantees that a community will get left behind as the economy increasingly demands that companies compete not just with their neighbors next door, but with the entire world. [My emphasis.]


We are certainly seeing an exodus of skilled young IT graduates to other countries. Copper internet is condemning us to being a “left behind” nation.

. . . the success of these networks is beginning to open eyes around the country: If we start treating the internet not as a product sold by a company but as a necessary utility, can the economic prospects of rural America be saved?


Or Australia?

Fiber and power are inextricably linked in Chattanooga. EPB, the city’s government-owned electrical utility, was uniquely positioned to build out the network, and the power grid is much better off for it. In late 2009, EPB began to modernize the city’s electrical grid in hopes of limiting outages. The utility also wanted to install “smart meters” on individual residents’ homes, which would require a communications link as well.

“The first thing our engineers determined was that in order to automate anything, you need a communications infrastructure,” EPB spokesperson Danna Bailey told me. “We didn’t want something that would have been obsolete in five years, so fiber optics were the way to go.”


Powerlines make a lousy data communication network, fibre makes a great one.

Downtown Chattanooga already had Comcast internet service, but the outskirts of town and more rural areas in the surrounding counties had little or no access to broadband—most were stuck on ADSL or satellite connections. Comcast had shown little interest in expanding out its cable networks or upgrading speeds within the city. . .

“We didn't rate with Comcast because we were a small market,” Ron Littlefield, Chattanooga’s mayor at the time, told me. “By virtue of that, we had little say over what service we were receiving.”

When the fiber plan became public, Comcast and AT&T, which also had a small presence in parts of the county, were furious. Representatives for the companies scheduled meetings with Littlefield to try to persuade him to reconsider, and then turned to more drastic measures.


And of course Telstra here managed to kill fast internet.

Today, EPB offers service to 180,000 homes and businesses in southeast Tennessee and northwest Georgia. As of July, EPB had 83,000 internet customers, far above its break-even line of 42,000.

EPB has signed up more than 8,000 customers for its $69.99 per month gigabit service. Its most popular offering is still the 100 Mbps option at $57.99 per month. Earlier this year, EPB also started offering a 10 Gbps internet option, which is $299.99 per month and is the fastest internet option available in the country (several other municipal networks around the country also offer this speed, but no higher).


This would be a real 100mbps, not a “Longy 100mps” service  ;D  And the networks offering this service are municipal ones, not AT&T or Verizon or whatever. And Chattanooga is attracting people and startups, I remind you.

This is what I have been saying, the opportunity cost of using string and cans instead of a real network:
An independent study published by University of Tennessee last year noted that EPB’s network could be directly tied to the creation of between 2,800 and 5,200 new jobs and said that the economic benefits for the city have been roughly $1 billion over the course of the last five years.


Between 2,800 and 5,200 new jobs—while similar sized towns in the US (and here) are dying. Pretty good and the town is getting a very nice tax dividend from its internet and electricity business. Here we desperately need new revenue because the Libs are letting tens of billions of tax revenue go to the top 10%.

We have been saying this too:
Chattanooga’s unemployment rate peaked at over 10 percent during the aftermath of the 2008 economic downturn; it now hovers just less than 5 percent. In 2014, the city had the third highest wage growth in the country among mid-sized cities.


Australia too could have had a jobs boom but instead its two cans and a piece of string “broadband network” has paid no dividend at all: revenue is derisory and, as predicted, we have no job benefits. The HUGE opportunity and human cost of the stupid MTM!

“The true economic value of the fiber infrastructure is much greater than the cost of installing and maintaining the infrastructure,” the University of Tennessee study concluded.

Not for our rotten copper based set of networks. And it will have to be redone ASAP, what a waste of $60Bn, just think of the REAL benefits we should get out of such a huge investment! SIXTY BILLION DOLLARS for no real benefit and a revenue barely paying for the expensive upkeep and power needed to keep the farce going. The small cabinets chosen for political reasons are going to see nodes fail every single summer!

The railroad left town, and the city was in decline. Left in its wake were rotting shells of old buildings.

An urban renewal program in the 90s—including a minor league baseball stadium and Tennessee’s largest aquarium—started to turn downtown around, but there’s still a surplus of old hollowed-out buildings and largely empty surface-level parking lots that take up entire blocks of the city.

It’s clear those buildings won’t remain empty for long. Construction crews are renovating the shells of mid-century buildings in the city’s new “Innovation District.” For instance: An abandoned hotel in the heart of the Innovation District will become the “Tomorrow Building,” a “startup hostel” that I swear isn’t an idea cribbed from the TV show Silicon Valley. Save for the exposed brick walls, the inside of the Tomorrow Building doesn’t look like much now—the floors are still concrete and there’s sawdust everywhere. But in a couple months, there’ll be startup types living and working in a space designed to “increase collision” among young people in hopes that they’ll found successful companies.


Chattanooga zooming ahead while we sink to the poor white trash of Asia.

With gigabit fiber internet slowly proliferating around the country because of municipal fiber projects, Google Fiber, startup ISPs, and new investment from incumbents spurred by competition, America is quickly dividing into two segments: Those who have fast internet and those who do not. Jobs—in any meaningful number, at least—will not continue to exist in towns and rural areas that lack fast, accessible internet access.


As we see here with combined un- and under- employment level of 15% (estimated.) We WOULD be doing better if abbott had been a real man not a childishwrecker who just wanted to wreck Labor’s NBN because it was Labor’s idea. I wonder how the Lib vote would be holding up now after 3 years of ramping up the FTTH rollout? Bet it would be better than 47%!

Earlier this week, Google Fiber announced that it would be significantly scaling back its activities and wouldn't expand to new cities for the time being. This announcement has led some to suggest that fiber isn't a necessary technology. More important than overall speed, however, is the reliability, accessibility, and cost of broadband networks. On that front, small towns and rural America has been utterly failed by incumbent providers who have little incentive to upgrade their networks without the pressure of competition from another business or from a municipality itself.

“For smaller towns, building a network becomes a question of economic survival—they’re emptying out because kids grow up and there’s no jobs for them,” Masha Zager, editor in chief of Broadband Communities magazine, a trade publication that covers cities that have build their own networks, told me. “Sometimes, it’s a question of keeping businesses and allowing them to grow, sometimes it’s about enabling teleworking, sometimes it’s about attracting businesses to come to town.”


Really big stuff can’t be left just to private enterprise and again we see that here with Telstra.

We know this all too well and are wasting fortunes on private colleges that teach. . .nothing much, really:
“Some of the most painful stresses running through the labor market have to do with technology-driven skills requirement change and technology-driven employment opportunity change,” Mark Muro, policy director of the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings, told me. “I think that these are pervasive effects sweeping through the entire economy. Most growth in job categories are happening either at the very bottom where there can be a physical service provision or it’s occurring at the higher levels where there’s much more of a need for more complex or creative skills.”


This is why we need the real, FTTH NBN:
What’s happening, then, is that young people are leaving behind rural communities as early as possible toward places with better economies, while older folks are getting automated out of jobs that don’t exist anymore and won’t exist ever again. In part because we have utterly failed at providing broadband to rural communities, there’s a built-up dearth of technical skill and job retraining opportunities for older workers.


Young people are leaving Australia because the Lib govt shows them that Australia doesn’t care about them. With them they take our lifeblood!

More clear analogies with Telstra:
“What we have right now is not the free market, it’s regulations protecting giant corporations, which is the exact definition of crony capitalism,” she said. “Without fiber in the 21st century, our towns are going to disappear one obituary at a time because the young people can’t stay. The people are suffering because AT&T’s business model prevents them from wiring these communities and st[url][url][/url][/url]ill meeting their profit margins.”


Obviously the MTM rubbish was about protecting Telstra! Crony capitalism indeed!

“When you have a fiber network that’s only limited by the electronics on each end, you don’t have to cap off the traffic that can run back and forth,” she said. “You don’t have to worry about net neutrality—there’s plenty of room for all the traffic. We have no intentions of having data caps.”

Copper, OTOH, requires constant maintenance (and Telstra copper is corroded and too thin anyway) and lots of expensive power. The MTM is a waste of time and (lots) of money.

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/chattanooga-gigabit-fiber-network
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 27 Nov 2016, 18:15

From Whirlpool:

For the few strange people on this forum that still think FTTN is the right way for Australia to go, the ITU just released the 2016 global ICT developement[sic] index.

Australia dropped 2 places from number 12 since last year, and if you look at page 24 of the report, came very nearly last out of 175 countries for year on year improvement (with almost no measured improvement, saved from dead last only by the 5 that managed to actually go backwards).

http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Documents/publications/misr2016/MISR2016-w4.pdf

A full year of rolling out FTTN resulted in very nearly no improvement at all, and in fact a drop compared to the 170 other countries that did better. I would be furious if my government was doing this with my money, and I just really cant see how anyone is still defending this.


http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum/?action=herring&r=52183870&tpr=2585179,27,522
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 28 Nov 2016, 18:36

As well as nodes failing due to heat this summer mounting technical problems and “Service Class 0” premises (i.e. service can’t be delivered) is going to avalanche and bury NBN Co, the RSPs and the telcomms ombudsman.

Can’t wait!
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 30 Nov 2016, 09:32

If only we had a real NBN:

In a desperate bid to fight the “data drought” in the bush, farmers and rural groups are joining forces with consumer advocates.

The new Regional, Rural and Remote communications coalition comes as complaints to the ombudsman surge outside the capital cities.

Their biggest gripes are internet drop outs, low data allowances, slow speeds, and poor National Broadband Network (NBN) connections.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-30/new-coalition-to-lobby-for-telco-improvements-in-the-bush/8075218

Fuck I hope the Nats lose votes and seats over this. After designing a network VERY similar to the NBN (i.e. FTTH) they betrayed their base by letting the Libs kill the NBN and waste $60Bn (at least, likely more) on the MTM crap. Their base is further betrayed by the satellite and fixed wireless parts being oversubscribed.
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 30 Nov 2016, 10:01

Even the national shit sheet had to report the MTM is a fucking mess and drain on finances. No link of course.

Putting the best gloss—only quality turd polish used—and talking of a 100:25 FTTN working OK (as it should, for a while, where there is new copper) but the plan is 100:40 which hardly anyone gets—25:5 which turns out to be 18:2 usually, less at peak hours—so 100:25 sounds very very sus. Likely really 60:20 instead of 100:40.

FTTH works fine, none of the other techs do. The satellite service is total crap—too many put on there by the Libs needing to save pennies as the MTM just costs and costs and costs and returns fuck all revenue while costing a mint to maintain and power the copper.

So not even the national shit sheet can say anything good about FTTN apart from quoting one on “100:25”
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 30 Nov 2016, 21:40

From Whirlpool, just another thing we can’t do because of Lib bloodymindedness!

Article on growth in the Internet of things. How its driving energy efficiency and helping the world reach its goals of combating climate change.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/how-the-internet-of-things-is-helping-fight-climate-change?utm_content=bufferbf106&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

something as basic as smart trash cans can play a role. Since they announce when they are full, garbage trucks don’t drive to empty them as often. Some regions have reduced pickups by 80%.It is interesting to see just how many things can benefit from being connected and how companys who have gone it alone have acheived the benefits of it.

One of the biggest challenges for a lower-carbon future is that regulation and business models are lagging behind technology. We need to reward entrepreneurs who use IoT to drive down pollution.
It's all apart of providing solutions and being prepared for future problems. I strongly doubt the MTM would be compatible given the unreliability and limitations in the current network plan.


(spelling errors NOT mine, LOL!)
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 30 Nov 2016, 21:40

Well worth reading that article linked to in the above post, well worth it!

Just a simple example: smart meters work a lot better over a FTTH network than over the powerlines. This is just the easy first step.
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 01 Dec 2016, 12:05

Another cable (HFC) operator moving to FTTH even tho it costs to roll out. From Whirlpool we hear of one NOT changing to FTTH:

Old Rupert would be paying attention to this

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-30/espn-still-bleeding-subs-12mm-people-ditch-service-past-2-months-alone

If they are losing subscribers at this rate then Fox would be straight onto this. The punters are getting tired of paying their fees for sports they don't watch. Streaming is starting to do some damage. They will have to compete on the same platform or die a long slow death.


http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=2585179&p=67#r1328

So I guess development of cable (to DOCSIS3.1) is not going to be a big thing. This could effect Malcolm’s Terrible Muddle.


Another thing I picked up on reading this 60 page Whirlpool thread (NBN-Coalition policy part 90 :roll :bgrin ) is that the FTTN is bogging down, low uptake, lots of properties that can’t connect and so on. 25:5 or 12:1 is pretty much the only plans taken up: it is all you can get (except for a very few.) Then, 18 months after declaring an area RFS (ready for service) ADSL/landline phones are disconnected so if you are SF0 (unable to get a service on FTTN) you are fucked! So NBN Co is cooking the MTM books! THAT can’t go on forever!

I think this summer will see droves of nodes stop working because of the heat. If we are really unlucky batteries in the nodes might explode. What a fucking putrid $60Bn mess the Libs have landed us with :smack
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 01 Dec 2016, 12:51

And another former cable TV co now all FTTH, again from Whirlpool:

If I cast my mind back there was a Dutch streaming company like Foxtel which used Cable.
When they started to roll-out fibre in Deutschland the company went with it instead of against and they are now making a killing with a way better streaming service including HD and 4k.

You'd be talking about Ziggo
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ziggo


Meantime we are stuck with crap, obsolete FTTN/VDSLx over too thin and too rotten Telstra copper. No wonder our educational ranking has slid below Khazakstan :sad
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 02 Dec 2016, 13:26

Morgan:

Second wind lifts Netflix over 5.75 million Australians – but not everyone actually watches it



Over 50% of households I think? No 4k TV for Australia—our poor substitute for broadband can’t handle it.
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 22 Jan 2017, 21:40

Maybe why we DON’T have an NBN. Brilliant post on Whirlpool:

texmex writes...
That seems consistent with what took place then, though more than napkins may have been involved. Looking back with hindsight, one MTM theme is their involvement with current/former Telstra people.

It would be interesting to know if the coalition had any discussions with them about the form of MTM, since there now seem to be many advantages for Telstra in the way it's been set out and applied.

It's possible; the process may have been "We need a policy. Malcolm, ring someone at Telstra, see what our options might be." Telstra person: "Really? You're serious? Well, I know EXACTLY what you should do, it will be great for our shareholders... uh... I mean, for the public, yeah, for the public. Trust me, this is a great idea – and Rupert will like it too."

It seems clear beyond reasonable doubt that their approach was dead-set ABF: Anything But Fibre.

I think that's the give way isn't it? Any sensible policy would've been truly technology agnostic. But for this policy, it has entirely been about saying "fibre is wrong (because it was Labor's idea)" and that overarching idea has driven the ENTIRE policy and every decision made since. Every decision, in a piece of major national infrastructure of tens of billions of dollars, made with the express purpose of making Labor look bad/keeping the myth that Labor were wrong – all other considerations (cost, quality, value for money) have been superseded by the political goal. It's really rather sad. No, not just sad – pathetic, and ultimately indefensible.

Yes, but it may have fulfilled a main point: to muddy waters and confuse the public with richly iterated, fine-sounding rhetoric — with understandably few non-tech people realising it was a load of crap.

It's not just about confusing the public. It's an insanely effective bit of double speak. The Liberals have managed to stand up with a straight face and WIN the "Labor Waste" argument – all the while themselves committing what I'm sure the history books will remember as the SINGLE largest case of "government waste" Australia has ever seen. Literally pissing billions of dollars into the wind. But you won't read that anywhere: we all KNOW the Liberals are the better economic managers, and that Labor is wasteful. We just know it. Evidence is futile.


https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=2600275&p=15#r283

And another one:
texmex writes...
That seems consistent with what took place then, though more than napkins may have been involved. Looking back with hindsight, one MTM theme is their involvement with current/former Telstra people.

It would be interesting to know if the coalition had any discussions with them about the form of MTM, since there now seem to be many advantages for Telstra in the way it's been set out and applied.


It's possible; the process may have been "We need a policy. Malcolm, ring someone at Telstra, see what our options might be." Telstra person: "Really? You're serious? Well, I know EXACTLY what you should do, it will be great for our shareholders... uh... I mean, for the public, yeah, for the public. Trust me, this is a great idea – and Rupert will like it too."

It seems clear beyond reasonable doubt that their approach was dead-set ABF: Anything But Fibre.

I think that's the give way isn't it? Any sensible policy would've been truly technology agnostic. But for this policy, it has entirely been about saying "fibre is wrong (because it was Labor's idea)" and that overarching idea has driven the ENTIRE policy and every decision made since. Every decision, in a piece of major national infrastructure of tens of billions of dollars, made with the express purpose of making Labor look bad/keeping the myth that Labor were wrong – all other considerations (cost, quality, value for money) have been superseded by the political goal. It's really rather sad. No, not just sad – pathetic, and ultimately indefensible.

Yes, but it may have fulfilled a main point: to muddy waters and confuse the public with richly iterated, fine-sounding rhetoric — with understandably few non-tech people realising it was a load of crap.

It's not just about confusing the public. It's an insanely effective bit of double speak. The Liberals have managed to stand up with a straight face and WIN the "Labor Waste" argument – all the while themselves committing what I'm sure the history books will remember as the SINGLE largest case of "government waste" Australia has ever seen. Literally pissing billions of dollars into the wind. But you won't read that anywhere: we all KNOW the Liberals are the better economic managers, and that Labor is wasteful. We just know it. Evidence is futile.

Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 25 Jan 2017, 14:39

Ahahahaha, from Whirlpool:


http://www.itnews.com.au/news/nbn-still ... and-448689

You know its bad when the American telecoms is using the NBN as an example of why governments shouldn't rollout a network.

“The NBN is an example of an intrusive policy subject to political pressures that has resulted in inefficiencies that distort consumer patterns and investment decisions without changing the competitive landscape,” TPI said.

“This case study illustrates how large scale public infrastructure projects in the telecommunications sector take decades to roll out, are subject to political pressures and result in little or no value to consumers.”


Fucking drongos abbott and waffles!
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 26 Jan 2017, 08:10

Researches in Japan have worked out a way to fit 14 cores in a 125micron fibre.

Each can carry tens of megabits of signal, 14petabits of info per 125micron cable! The square array would be a natural as are undersea comms cables.

Here we think too–thin, corroded copper is fine and reaching 25mbps once a day with 5 dropouts is fine and dandy :WTF
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 26 Jan 2017, 11:37

Cost of FTTH just keeps dropping and dropping:

http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2017/01/134bn-cost-deploying-ultrafast-ftth-broadband-across-eu28.html

So the cost of FTTH for the EU has been revised down a very long way. €156 billion or US$167 billion, down from $600 billion just months ago. What a bargain! It's not much more than the NBN to service 510 million in the EU. They should take it.

It doesn't make the current NBN policy look good, does it.


(Whirlpool)

No, it doesn’t make the idiotic MTM crap look good but then nothing can make the disaster look good.
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 26 Jan 2017, 14:14

Worlds moves to lightning fast fibre. Meanwhile, Africa nad Oz remain addicted to copper. FFS!

http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2017/01/copper-falls-ultrafast-fibre-boosts-global-broadband-users-823million.html
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 31 Jan 2017, 10:01

Anybody here see the new “GenNBN” ads?

The first one, someone researched all the businesses and organisations shown in the ad and showed they were all on FTTH! Talk about laff!

Second one, futuristic showed things that could ONLY be done with FTTH, and gigabit fibre at that.

Well, with client/ISP relationships at subzero temperatures Telstra, having sucked as much off the tax teat as it can in selling the copper, renting the conduits etc etc, is starting to (maybe cover its arse:)

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/technology/telstra-to-publish-nbn-download-speeds-as-experts-claim-australian-internet-users-are-confused/news-story/811ec35521df759099f5f6eb84d64287

Could be interesting if all RSPs break down speeds by location and tech. Won't look good for FTTN.


https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=2600275&p=51#r1006

The posts following and just before the above are very interesting to read.
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 31 Jan 2017, 10:08

https://www.moneyweb.co.za/news/tech/telkoms-dsl-base-in-decline-and-the-fibre-race-is-on/

Not in Australia where the national interest is subordinated to the interest of a certain disgusting yank!
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby Lefty » 01 Feb 2017, 06:22

With the fibs presiding over NBNfail, censusfail, taxofficefail and Centrelinkfail - I'd say the chances of having even a half-functioning NBN while the fibs are in charge is non-existent.
User avatar
Lefty
Bengal Tiger
 
Posts: 16304
Joined: 15 Nov 2009, 10:34

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 01 Feb 2017, 09:06

Non–existent is right!
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 01 Feb 2017, 14:34

Hah! Was on the South Coast on Monday, en route to paying a bit of my layby in Strathalbyn then to Murray Bridge to visit niece and pick up new tiles from Beaumont Tiles. The EFTPOS machine wasn’t working in the shop I was in or the restaurant up the street etc.

Of course I jumped in to diss copper and Turnbull and laud FTTH. Never ever miss a chance to do that!
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Re: If we had an NBN

Postby HBS Guy » 09 Feb 2017, 14:20

Loss on the rollout by NBN Co is $1.83Bn, revenue a paltry $400m.

When you roll out a substandard network expect substandard revenue. My dog knows this (she doesn’t behave she gets no treats etc,) why don’t the Libs?

Try to increase ARPU (Average Revenue per User)—how? Broadband over crap, too–thin Telstra copper barely reaches 25mbps. Even those that “win nodelotto” see speeds drop as more and more are cut over to their node. There are several choke points:

1. The Telstra copper—thin so high impedance. Real bb-capable copper is .6mm diameter or thicker and METICULOUSLY maintained, not “Bagdad.” Telstra copper is .32mm or .4mm diameter.

2. The node, WAY underprovisioned with fibre: one 1gbps fibre to serve 192 (350 in some) copper lines. When usage approaches maximum that choke point causes congestion and radical drops in speed. ADSL does not have this choke point.

3. CVC charges are high so ISPs are under provisioning backhaul from the POIs (and there are too many POIs thanks to the ACCC being snowed by Telstra.

Good luck trying to increase revenue! About all they could try and do is lower CVC prices but that will cut revenue at least initially. Or spend an extra $500 per node and replace the basic card with one that has, IIRC, 8 1gigabit fibres. No way, what is that, $500 (plus labor cost, say $50 per node) for 30,000 nodes so cost - $550 x 30,000 = $16.5m dollars. Doubt we will see that.

So no hope, costs to roll out, cost to maintain and power the copper. Miniscule revenue. Hopeless.
Abbott & Co are going to cause the mother and father of all recessions—be prepared!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 40671
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 15:37

Next

Return to Politics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests