Agnes has been diagnosed. Prognosis is not good

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Agnes has been diagnosed. Prognosis is not good

Postby Squire » 08 Oct 2017, 18:54

Its official. Agnes has been diagnosed with severe depression. The illness is triggered every morning when she looks in the mirror.

Agnes flies into a rage when even thick layers of her make-up fail to hide the ghoul-like appearance staring back from her mirror.

Agnes's symptoms were reported as "feeling anxious, nervous and “on the edge”, while regularly feeling easily annoyed or irritated." That is diagnosed as the 2 metre long toe syndrome.

The classic symptom of incessant snitching to moderators about particular Ozpolitic posters has recently been exposed.

Agnes also bitches about the travails of her grandson Bobby who is getting too much behind in his social life.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/aug/27/survey-finds-40-of-women-have-been-diagnosed-with-depression-or-anxiety

Survey finds 40% of Australian women diagnosed with depression or anxiety
Jean Hailes women’s health survey finds women aged 18-35 have the highest anxiety scores, with social media being partly to blame
woman at table hands at temple

Technology and social media has been blamed for putting ‘an enormous amount of pressure’ on young women.

A survey of more than 10,000 Australian women found 40% have been professionally diagnosed with depression or anxiety.

The Jean Hailes Women’s Health survey 2017 released on Sunday, also found 60% did not meet the recommended 2.5 hours of weekly physical activity because for many they were “too tired” or it was too “hard” to find the time.

Two out of five women surveyed, aged 18-89, considered themselves slightly overweight, while 20% said they were quite overweight.

Only a quarter had been screened for sexually transmitted infections in the last five years. The survey found 95% of women were non-smokers.

The survey director, Dr Helen Brown, said the findings raised particular concern about the mental health of young women.

“The 18 to 35-year-olds had the highest anxiety scores, that’s even more telling,” she said.

Technology and social media was to blame, Brown said. “I think they put an enormous amount of pressure on themselves to be ‘ever-ready’, to be on Instagram et cetera, which means they constantly have their phone in their hand and being ready for it,” Brown said.

The survey asked women what had bothered them in the past two weeks and nearly half agreed to “worrying too much about different things”.

More than 40% reported feeling anxious, nervous and “on the edge”, while many agreed to regularly feeling easily annoyed or irritated.

Adding to a woman’s anxiety was an overload of health information available to them online, the survey concluded.

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“They are getting a lot of information about their health but actually they are getting too much and so they’re getting confused as to what they should trust,” said Brown.

“In the old days we used to get health messages from our GPs, you know very restricted views, and now that it’s open to everything its really hard to work out who to believe.”

The survey found women were most concerned about menopause, bone health, breast and bowel health, and painful sex.

The advice for women was to go back to the “basics”. “Behaviour change is extremely complicated, we live in a very complex environment but it’s still trying to remember the basics of eating well, exercising well or being active,” said Brown.

She said being active did not mean going for a 10km run or going to the gym.

“Physical activity’s not about that – it’s just making sure you’re active throughout the day, like using the stairs instead of the lift,” Brown said.

Women’s health week starts on 4 September.
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Re: Agnes has been diagnosed. Prognosis is not good

Postby Cherie » 09 Oct 2017, 12:27

no prizes for 2nd squire this is what I said to you regarding the ugly pictures you post- pretty sure I am right and looks like you have taken my advice on board- good boy
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Re: Agnes has been diagnosed. Prognosis is not good

Postby Squire » 09 Oct 2017, 13:56

A.G wrote:no prizes for 2nd squire this is what I said to you regarding the ugly pictures you post- pretty sure I am right and looks like you have taken my advice on board- good boy


Agnes, you must be sick. That's the nicest thing you ever said to me. Thanks for the photo of yourself you sent me. I have converted it into a dog urinal.

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Re: Agnes has been diagnosed. Prognosis is not good

Postby Squire » 10 Oct 2017, 13:03

It's official, tests on monkeys more intelligent than Agnes has confirmed that Agnes's toxic mind state is due to inefficient biological processes which have allowed toxic waste and pox particulates to congeal and fester in Agnes's head, similar to the huge fatbergs in Londons underground sewers.

In trial simulations on Agnes's condition, the closest man-made process they found to Agnes's brain was a sewage works. Tests have proved that Agnes's head would benefit from a jolly good flush.
The test monkeys got better but Agnes is still a worry. The monkeys are currently sharing their bananas with Agnes to help her heal. :WTF :WTF :WTF

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/03/555353033/brains-link-to-immune-system-might-help-explain-alzheimers

Brain's Link To Immune System Might Help Explain Alzheimer's

Fresh evidence that the body's immune system interacts directly with the brain could lead to a new understanding of diseases from multiple sclerosis to Alzheimer's.

A study of human and monkey brains found lymphatic vessels — a key part of the body's immune system — in a membrane that surrounds the brain and nervous system, a team reported Tuesday in the online journal eLife.

Lymphatic vessels are a part of the lymphatic system, which extends throughout the body much like our network of veins and arteries. Instead of carrying blood, though, these vessels carry a clear fluid called lymph, which contains both immune cells and waste products.

The new finding bolsters recent evidence in rodents that the brain interacts with the body's lymphatic system to help fend off diseases and remove waste. Until a few years ago, scientists believed that the brain's immune and waste removal systems operated independently.

The discovery of lymphatic vessels near the surface of the brain could lead to a better understanding of multiple sclerosis, which seems to be triggered by a glitch in the immune system, says Dr. Daniel Reich, an author of the study and a senior investigator at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

"How the immune system interacts with the brain is fundamental to how multiple sclerosis develops and how we treat multiple sclerosis," Reich says.

Current treatments for multiple sclerosis often involve drugs that suppress the immune system.

The research also has implications for diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

These diseases occur as certain toxic waste products accumulate in the brain. And lymphatic vessels appear to be part of the system that usually removes these waste products.

"The discovery of a lymphatic system in the brain raises the possibility that a disorder of the lymphatic system is somehow involved in the causation of Alzheimer's disease," says Dr. Michael Weiner, a professor of radiology at the University of California San Francisco, who was not connected with the study.

That sort of thinking is a radical change from just a few years ago, Reich says.

For centuries, most scientists believed that the body's lymphatic system didn't connect to the brain, Reich says. "The brain is thought to be what is called immune-privileged," he says. "It has a different immune system from the rest of the body."

So Reich was intrigued when he heard a talk in 2015 by Jonathan Kipnis, who directs the neuroscience department at the University of Virginia.

"He showed very clearly in this talk that there are lymph vessels in the head, which I had learned in medical school didn't exist," Reich says.

But the evidence was in mice. So Reich and a team of scientists used MRI to study the brains of several human volunteers.

Where Does Alzheimer's Treatment Go From Here?
The scientists injected a special dye into the bloodstream, then watched to see where it went. They focused on the dura mater, the outermost membrane that protects the brain and nervous system.

As expected, the team saw some of the dye leak out of blood vessels in the dura mater. But then they could see that the leaked dye was being collected by different vessels – which is exactly what happens in the lymphatic system.

"That gave us some evidence that there are vessels here that are behaving different from blood vessels," Reich says. "But we weren't sure that they were lymphatic vessels."

To be certain, Reich's team spent years perfecting a technique to reveal the lymphatic vessels in the dura mater of brains taken from human cadavers. This allowed the scientists to confirm the presence of these vessels near the surface of the brain. And it strongly suggested that the lymphatic system interacts directly with the brain.

The results extend the findings of a landmark study published in 2013. It found that the brain appears to flush out waste products during sleep.

But it wasn't clear how these waste products were draining out of the head. Now it appears that at least some of the waste might be exiting through the lymphatic system.
Last edited by Squire on 10 Oct 2017, 13:52, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Agnes has been diagnosed. Prognosis is not good

Postby Aussie » 10 Oct 2017, 13:52

Not Agnes, but does this remind you of anyone?

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Re: Agnes has been diagnosed. Prognosis is not good

Postby Squire » 10 Oct 2017, 13:54

Aussie wrote:Not Agnes, but does this remind you of anyone?

Image


Agnes's son, Herbert the pervert?

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[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tG-AwQAvbRo[/youtube]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tG-AwQAvbRo
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