The moving finger writes. . .

For chatting about non-political topics.

Hot topic: The perils of exercise, Lapidary, food, gardening, brewing & Gallipoli/Anzac Day.

Special feature: WWIi Operation Manna/Chowhound.
.

Open to guest posting.

Moderator: DonDeeHippy

Forum rules
The rules for this board are in the Charter of Moderation. Off Topic is for fairly serious discussion of things other than politics and current affair.

The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 15 Jan 2020, 08:07

It is now 2020. So items made in 1920 are now classed as “antique” so Art Deco is moving into the “antique” designation.

For china made in England it is easy to tell the age of the more recent items: pressure from the yanks made English pottery firms first stamp “England” into the base of their wares (1890) and “Made in England” in 1921. To date things a bit further back a saucer like modern ones, with a place for the cup to go, were common by 1865.

Why am I blithering about this? I have a yen to buy some pieces of English earthenware designed by the three ladies of the Art Deco period: Suzie Cooper, Charlotte Rhead and Clarice Cliff. Clarice was reportedly mad as a cut snake. After saving madly for the last trip and the pergolas I want to splurge a bit!

I guess the spur was buying a Suzie Cooper footed cup and saucer November or December last year. I have a vase by Charlotte Rhead and want to buy something different by her. Will buy something by Suzie Cooper as well, a charger maybe.

Clarice Cliff is by far the best known. As a very young man I bought a plate “Wilkinson’s Honey Glaze” signed by Clarice but don’t know if I still have it and want something more appealing anyway. Pieces by Clarice will be the most expensive I guess as she is the best known by far.

So looking for something by Charlotte. Have a bid on another vase but think I will retract it and by a nice little cup and saucer designed by her:

Not too dear and not at all similar to the Charlotte Rhead vase I have. Can easily spend $A500 + postage on this stuff and it isn’t even porcelain or all that bloody old! The c&s will cost just under $60 incl postage. Talking of postage—US postal charges are a fucking rip off! Apparently the USPS has to make a profit on every item but that makes it very expensive and I just do not

The real value in porcelain and earthenware is whether the decoration is printed or hand painted. These are reasonably easy to tell at a glance: handpainted a a tad blobby and “goes over the lines” a bit, printed is depressingly uniform and tidy. The Rhead c&s is printed not handpainted but I might buy it anyway—a few bills will fall due this month! It is the design that matters he tells himself.

When I have bought the Rhead, Cooper and Cliff I think I need to buy some Art Nouveau and research the Arts and Crafts movement, a revolt against mechanisation of production. I want my house to be Art Nouveau in style as much as possible and some Arts and Crafts pieces might be nice too.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 15 Jan 2020, 08:29

Also in my sights, an Aesthetic Movement (1860-1890) teapot and a BuddyL model car. Both over $100, hoping to buy both together and get a big discount! Next month.

Have to keep in mind the $2500 needed for my little orchard plus another 20 trees for it ($600 easy) but can afford some fun.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby Lols » 15 Jan 2020, 09:59

That’s very pretty, the cup and saucer. I love Art Deco!
We went on a cruise last year and did NZ. A fave destination was Napier! Totally Art Deco rebuilt after a devastating earthquake back in the 1930’s.
They have this Art Deco festival in February every year (Hawkes Bay) and everyone dresses up roaring 20’s style and all the classic vintage cars drive around.
It was a treat when we all went back to ship to embark on our journey again, a lot of locals with their Art Deco outfits and vintage vehicles, were all lined up to have photos with the passengers. It was such an amazing treat.
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themsleves and wiser people so full of doubts" ~ Bertrand Russell
User avatar
Lols
Irish wolfhound
 
Posts: 637
Joined: 10 Jun 2014, 23:58
spamone: Animal

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 15 Jan 2020, 11:08

Sounds great!

Have had to postpone buying a bit—budgets are such a bummer—but next month will make some acquisitions.

Monday, in Strathalbyn, I bought an original small tin advertisement for—Baby powder! Be neat in my bathroom! Outside the bathroom will be an original Pears soap print, framed and glassed. On the toilet door a sign “inspections strictly by appointment” because you can’t crowd the smallest room in the house!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 16 Jan 2020, 15:16

Found some money and bought a really nice, handpainted vase signed by Charlotte Rhead and Bursley Ware, England. So early 1920s, antique. Would have hated to see that go to someone else.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby DonDeeHippy » 16 Jan 2020, 15:23

I have a friend who loves art Deco and bought himself a wonderful house in Bundaberg in that style, I never even noticed until he educated my eye to the stuff, he had to take me around the town and show me all the examples… Can you give us a piccy of the Dish ? :purple
Bongalong... for some reason women are just so superior to anything that ever existed or will ever exist!
User avatar
DonDeeHippy
Jaguar
 
Posts: 2296
Joined: 25 Apr 2018, 20:18
spamone: Animal

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 16 Jan 2020, 16:01

Once I get them—Ebay does not provide simple links to images. People sold me the vase (via Ebay) had to flee the fires but their house is OK. Can’t escape the bloody fires, can you?

So now I got 3 pieces by Rhead, couple months time look for some stuff by Suzie Cooper, something different to the cup and saucer I have. A charger to hang on the wall be nice. Then Clarice.

Both pieces by Rhead I bought this week are marked “Bursley Ware England” so very early 1920s, antique status!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 16 Jan 2020, 16:19

Bit of history:

When Wood and Sons was formed in 1865 by Thomas Francis Wood its pedigree was unrivalled. Thomas was the fifth generation in line to Moses Wood who was brother to Aaron and Ralph. These three giants of the 18th century potteries laid the foundation of the Woods dynasty which was to survive for over 200 years. Thomas, a prominent citizen in the potteries and later to become the Mayor of Burslem, built Wood and Sons into one of the largest companies in the area. By the early years of the 20th century the company had expanded to include a number of potteries, those included the Trent, New Wharf, Stanley and the Alexandra. The latter was run under the name of H.J. Wood and although sharing the New Wharf site, was run as a separate company. H.J. Wood was owned by Thomas's younger brother Henry J. Wood. In 1889 Thomas's son Harry Francis Wood joined the company and by the early part of the century had become its chairman. Using his ability to recognise and nurture talent, together with his undoubted skills as a businessman, he continued the growth of Woods for the next forty years.

Frederick and Charlotte Rhead

In 1912 Frederick Rhead was appointed as art director of Wood and Sons and was joined by his daughter Charlotte shortly afterwards. Charlotte left Woods in 1915 only to return again in 1920, the reason for her absence is unclear. Frederick produced many designs for Woods, amongst them were the tube lined Elers and Trellis patterns and it was not long before the popularity of the tube lined designs persuaded Harry Wood to acquire the Crown Pottery which was adjacent to the Stanley for the production of art wares. This new venture was set up under the name of Bursley Ltd. in 1920. The Crown Pottery was well equipped being one of the first potteries in the Stoke on Trent area with a Dressier Tunnel Kiln, until then all firing at Woods had been done using Bottle Kilns. The Ellgreave and Alexandra potteries continued to use Bottle Kilns until the late 1940's. The Dressier Kiln which was approximately 75 feet in length was gas fired and only rarely cooled for maintenance work to be carried out. The racks holding the pieces to be fired were passed through the kiln on trolleys. If a trolley became jammed or derailed workers would don asbestos suits and carry out work in the cooler ends of the tunnel whilst the kiln was still being fired.

In the early 1920's Woods purchased shares in the Ellgreave Pottery to such a degree that a number of the Woods family were on the board of directors. The Ellgreave Pottery was originally sited in Ellgreave Street, but moved in the early 1960's to the Wharf site. Initially the pottery was used to produce brown Lottie Rhead Ware although later it was used to produce teapots. Charlotte was a highly skilled tube-liner as well as designer, one of her tasks was to train staff and supervise the production of tube line ware as well as create new designs. Charlotte finally left Woods in 1926, but her father continued as art director until 1929.


http://www.thepotteries.org/features/wood.htm

I noticed some of the Rhead items listed for sale on Ebay mentioned “tubelined.”
Tubelining is a technique of ceramic decoration. It involves squeezing a thin line of clay body through a nozzle onto the ware being decorated. An alternative term is "slip trailing".

The skill takes time to acquire and it is associated with art pottery rather than mass production.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tubelining

It gives a slight 3D element. Will have to look for a piece of Rhead pottery with tubelining.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby DonDeeHippy » 16 Jan 2020, 17:23

I'm glad I Looked at Wood and Sons my Grandmother had a set of their china, my Mother has it, I'll find out who made it ,them or a later copy, I remember My Nan telling me the story of the willow when I was young :purple
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Bongalong... for some reason women are just so superior to anything that ever existed or will ever exist!
User avatar
DonDeeHippy
Jaguar
 
Posts: 2296
Joined: 25 Apr 2018, 20:18
spamone: Animal

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 16 Jan 2020, 18:06

Ah willow ware (generic description not the name of a pottery) which I never liked, too busy. Could be worth something depending on condition, age etc. Get Mum to leave you the willow!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby Aussie » 16 Jan 2020, 18:13

DonDeeHippy wrote:I have a friend who loves art Deco and bought himself a wonderful house in Bundaberg in that style, I never even noticed until he educated my eye to the stuff, he had to take me around the town and show me all the examples… Can you give us a piccy of the Dish ? :purple


That house in Walker Street......west Bundy?
User avatar
Aussie
Minister for Foreign Affairs
 
Posts: 9184
Joined: 13 Mar 2010, 17:25

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 16 Jan 2020, 18:19

Lots of old movie theaters were Art Deco.

German potters once the nazis were gone went back to Art Deco that that fun loving Adolf was cremated but used curves not angles to express it: this was called Deco Echo. I have a couple pieces like that.

Bloody Adolf closed the Bauhaus too, spoilsport!
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby DonDeeHippy » 16 Jan 2020, 20:45

Aussie wrote:
DonDeeHippy wrote:I have a friend who loves art Deco and bought himself a wonderful house in Bundaberg in that style, I never even noticed until he educated my eye to the stuff, he had to take me around the town and show me all the examples… Can you give us a piccy of the Dish ? :purple


That house in Walker Street......west Bundy?

one street behind walker I had to google map it, Lamb street about 2 streets from the show grounds. It was beautiful but cracking like mad now he lives at the hammoc :purple
Bongalong... for some reason women are just so superior to anything that ever existed or will ever exist!
User avatar
DonDeeHippy
Jaguar
 
Posts: 2296
Joined: 25 Apr 2018, 20:18
spamone: Animal

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby pinkeye » 16 Jan 2020, 23:32

HBS Guy wrote:Ah willow ware (generic description not the name of a pottery) which I never liked, too busy. Could be worth something depending on condition, age etc. Get Mum to leave you the willow!


My Mum had a thing for Willow Pattern. She acquired light fittings... a central piece, and two wall sconces. No idea what happened to them but they remind me of my childhood.

Any interest in unique 1936 Singer Sewing Machine with a metric wooden inlay tape along the front, plus tensioners etc, in metric..., of which only 2000 were ever made. ? EVER.?

The serial number identifies it. And the provenance.
sleeping is good for you
User avatar
pinkeye
Warthog
 
Posts: 4717
Joined: 01 Oct 2017, 20:59
spamone: Animal

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 17 Jan 2020, 01:12

Put it on Ebay. People buy them for various reasons which generally do not include sewing, e.g. turning them into tables. Could be worth something.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby Lols » 17 Jan 2020, 09:23

Re: vases, I attended an auction over a year ago nearby, where they sell lots of vintage stuff, well to my surprise, they were selling all these vintage vases, from this one elder gent that was a collector. People flew in from all over Australia to bud and buy these vases!
They went from about $4000 to $12000 each!!
I couldn’t believe it. Who would think vases of all things!
Oh but of course, and let’s not forget the latest hysteria over 1970s corningware!!
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themsleves and wiser people so full of doubts" ~ Bertrand Russell
User avatar
Lols
Irish wolfhound
 
Posts: 637
Joined: 10 Jun 2014, 23:58
spamone: Animal

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 17 Jan 2020, 12:31

Probably very old porcelain, early German or Chinese or Japanese etc. Chinese have had the knowledge to make “hard paste porcelain” for around 1000 years. Augustus the Strong king of Saxony (and claimed Sweden etc as well.) Deserved the appellation: as well as fighting in Sweden he had platoons of mistresses and regiments of bastards :rofl :rofl :rofl

Forget exactly when, 17th century I think. He had an alchemist imprisoned and forced him to work making porcelain, helped by a minor noble and letters from a Jesuit in China detailing bits of the technique as he learned them.



A late 17th or early 18th century Meissen vase would easily fetch several thousand dollars.

Dresden picked up the art of hard paste porcelain making. I have a little bakers boy figurine from Dresden (I do not go for figurines, do nothing for me but this one was nice as well as being Dresden:
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby pinkeye » 18 Jan 2020, 00:33

HBS Guy wrote:Put it on Ebay. People buy them for various reasons which generally do not include sewing, e.g. turning them into tables. Could be worth something.


I don't do E-Bay..... you are giving lots of people info about where you live and what you might have. Open invitation to crims... imho.
sleeping is good for you
User avatar
pinkeye
Warthog
 
Posts: 4717
Joined: 01 Oct 2017, 20:59
spamone: Animal

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Jan 2020, 01:15

Then talk to an antique shop or two, pretend you are looking to buy one.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby pinkeye » 18 Jan 2020, 01:27

thanks
sleeping is good for you
User avatar
pinkeye
Warthog
 
Posts: 4717
Joined: 01 Oct 2017, 20:59
spamone: Animal

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 24 Jan 2020, 19:50

The $500 Charlotte Rhead hand painted vase (handpainted is where the value lies, use a magnifying glass and if you see heaps of dots—that is printed. If you can see brushstrokes etc—hand painted. You will soon be able to tell which is which. One joker in the pack: enamels. I have a late 18th century Spode porcelain dish in the “kakiemon” color palette (rust, apricot and green etc) and they paint an emulsion of finely crushed minerals (hmmm ages ago that I read this, maybe glass is used?) and in the kiln the minerals melt and form an even layer, no texture, no dots no brush strokes.

Ahh nice to talk of art and antiques, been too immersed in bloody Tasmania for too long!

Will post some photos tomorrow.

So I have my original CRhead vase, one I got in the post yesterday and a jug I bought today and a bowl coming from England.

Time to look for some pieces designed by Suzy Cooper.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 25 Jan 2020, 15:39

OK, here are the two items:
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 25 Jan 2020, 15:44

On the left is a tubelined jug (you can see the tubelining best on the leaf just to the right of the big orange blob) and the really nice art deco vase I bought on Ebay (getting a nice $150 discount!)

Both pieces by Charlotte Rhead. The jug is so-so but I bought it because of the tubelining, Charlotte’s signature.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby HBS Guy » 07 Feb 2020, 23:25

Alright, got Charlotte Rhead covered, look for Clarice Cliff pieces later in the year. :oops :huh Put on layby today a biggish bowl (or casserole?) by Clarice. There was a weird solid timber Japanese doll/art piece signed by the artist who made it—I need to get the tag to give the details/ Put those on layby—might be slightly extended but the people in the shop there and in a couple in Strathalbyn know I pay regularly (that is what I was doing today, mainly, making payment on laybys at two different shops. One of these I actually rang to say I could not make it, would have to be next weekend—bit of communication always good.

While the handles on the Clarice Cliff piece were pure Art Deco I think the big decoration on the lid of the bowl/casserole harks back to the Aesthetic Movement Period.Or not.

Nice pieces anyway, in excellent condition.
User avatar
HBS Guy
Tractors to Australia
 
Posts: 55135
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 14:37

Re: The moving finger writes. . .

Postby pinkeye » 08 Feb 2020, 01:01

My old Singer works. She just needs someone who knows how to fix her. :?

SHIT. I paid a guy who advertised as an old Singer specialist good money, and all he did before leaving, apart from the usual, was tampering with the power array.
It worked fine.. before.. just needed attention... all I needed was someone to fit the new leather belt, and tension it properly for me. :sad :sad :sad :sad :sad

NOW.. if I turn her on she shorts out the circuits for all the powerpoints. Not the whole house. Someone said it's drawing too much power.

I can't afford much.. perhaps just an ordinary electrician could undo that so-called service and ..?/ maybe I could use her again. She comes with all replacement parts... she doesn't come with expertise. :sad
sleeping is good for you
User avatar
pinkeye
Warthog
 
Posts: 4717
Joined: 01 Oct 2017, 20:59
spamone: Animal

Next

Return to Off Topic

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: HBS Guy and 3 guests