Home automation

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Home automation

Postby HBS Guy » 31 Aug 2018, 18:01

We are on the verge of a new way of living: home automation.

“Renew—technology for a sustainable future” Issue 144 Jul–Sep 2018 has an interesting article on it.

To be able to tell a silicon assistant to turn a light on or off you need some electronics including bluetooth (or similar wireless technology.) So lots of devices constantly sucking in some current—that costs $ if on the grid. So we could use it to automate really essential functions if on the grid.

Some trivial bits of home automation: telephone answering machines, security lights, the fridge and freezer turning themselves on as needed.

Another article mentioned monitoring: monitoring power use, heating and cooling, give clues as to how to improve the energy efficiency of a home or solar cells etc. I think that might be a good use. As the globe warms energy efficiency of the home becomes more important.

So—plenty to think about.
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Re: Home automation

Postby Sprintcyclist » 31 Aug 2018, 18:07

AI is going to be significant
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Re: Home automation

Postby HBS Guy » 31 Aug 2018, 19:37

Automatic devices, monitoring devices—gather data, process data (Homeowner gone to bed? Lock doors and windows, turn lights off except in bedroom, set phone calls to be answered by the answering machine, check diary—any appointments/activities due?) and monitoring devices recorded power usages, power from solar cells and/or windmill, house temperatures etc etc—that data has to be stored.

So—home network (an Internet of Things in each home) but also the data will be sent to the cloud.

So—a REAL NBN is needed for this to really go ahead here.

And a wired home, just like a modern car with computer chip and bluetooth, has vulnerabilities to hackers.


I really think monitoring and automation in home temperature control is going to be very important—and I am going to build it in to my Tassie house. I won’t have superabundant money but I want high ceilings—one reason I want to BUILD my house, all the houses have such LOW ceilings —{claustrophobic!} So want high ceilings without needing huge heating. In Tassie I will need insulation under the fucking floor!

On the mainland—keeping cool without spending a fortune on airconditioning!

House designs are crap. A verandah should do what? Keep the summer sun off the walls and windows of the house while allowing the winter sun to reach walls/windows. So you have a modern house with useless/no verandahs: the flat roller blinds could be rolled down when the summer sun reaches that window. Saves $$$ in air conditioning.
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Re: Home automation

Postby johnsmith » 31 Aug 2018, 19:48

i don't trust them.

Companies like Amazon and google have already been reported recording private conversations people are having in their homes through the use of devices like 'Alexa;' and 'Siri'. One story I heard had a couple discussing the purchase of a big ticket item for the home, then a few days later the item was delivered to their door. Apparently 'alexa' overheard their conversation and ordered the device, charged their account, and arranged delivery all unbeknownst to the home owners.
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Re: Home automation

Postby HBS Guy » 31 Aug 2018, 20:17

Any new tech has hiccups. I am not worried about hiccups. And that example is not real I bet. I will not surrender my banking to direct debits etc!
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Re: Home automation

Postby johnsmith » 01 Sep 2018, 10:01

FD.
I hope that bitch who was running their brothels for them gets raped with a cactus.
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Re: Home automation

Postby Dax » 01 Sep 2018, 10:36

HBS Guy wrote:Automatic devices, monitoring devices—gather data, process data (Homeowner gone to bed? Lock doors and windows, turn lights off except in bedroom, set phone calls to be answered by the answering machine, check diary—any appointments/activities due?) and monitoring devices recorded power usages, power from solar cells and/or windmill, house temperatures etc etc—that data has to be stored.

So—home network (an Internet of Things in each home) but also the data will be sent to the cloud.

So—a REAL NBN is needed for this to really go ahead here.

And a wired home, just like a modern car with computer chip and bluetooth, has vulnerabilities to hackers.


I really think monitoring and automation in home temperature control is going to be very important—and I am going to build it in to my Tassie house. I won’t have superabundant money but I want high ceilings—one reason I want to BUILD my house, all the houses have such LOW ceilings —{claustrophobic!} So want high ceilings without needing huge heating. In Tassie I will need insulation under the fucking floor!

On the mainland—keeping cool without spending a fortune on airconditioning!

House designs are crap. A verandah should do what? Keep the summer sun off the walls and windows of the house while allowing the winter sun to reach walls/windows. So you have a modern house with useless/no verandahs: the flat roller blinds could be rolled down when the summer sun reaches that window. Saves $$$ in air conditioning.


My home is reasonably automated in regard to energy, the only thing connected to the internet is my server. Everything is restricted to in-house and always avoid buying smart appliances, or never connect them, running linux means I can actually control things and not be controlled like the majority are. Except for one phone, all mine and company are dumb phones, no internet but can take photo's and text. Same with our venues, to get on the Internet you have to go through the company main server, which will not allow you to as it is not connected to the Internet. We have one server that connects in the office, but it can't be connected to the main server whilst connected to the internet.

I would never trust smart appliances, you can be automated without being connected, all you need is a home server and running linux, even I can set that up.

If you want to have the best insulated and controlled temp house possible, then you need an earthen in ground house. You never have to do anything as the temp sits around 25deg all year round. Air circulation is automated, you notice when it comes on as a breeze floats through the house and it's very refreshing, when cooking, it goes all the time. In winter th extra heat goes into the glass house and in summer, is vented out of the house.
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Re: Home automation

Postby HBS Guy » 01 Sep 2018, 11:23

Yeah, can do a lot without letting devices on to the net.

Where my block is can’t have an earth covered home (floods, clay that moves a lot between seasons. I have read a bit about them and would give that option careful thought if it was possible, even knowing it will add a year to the approval process :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin

I will have to drive stumps or piers down to the bedrock 1200mm below the top of the soil. On top of that I will build a strawbale house. The outside walls will have 75mm of render on them, the outside layer will contain cement. Internally the outside walls will be rendered with lime plaster which allows the straw to breathe so if some moisture gets into the straw it can leave the straw.

That plus double glazed windows will give me a house that needs minimum heating and cooling.

I had thought that needing to put the house on stumps meant I couldn’t have strawbale but that was wrong. Found an article in a building magazine (OwnerBuilder or Renew.) If the council is going to be too bloody difficult about it I would go to timber frame with double width studs and fill the big cavities with insulation.

I want high ceilings but know full well that means more attention needs to be paid to insulation—bigger volume to be warmed.
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Re: Home automation

Postby Dax » 01 Sep 2018, 14:24

Be careful when thinking about using hay bails for your home, decades ago when a builder was involved in building homes made from hay bails, sadly none are still around. People forget that hay is designed to break down over time and nourish the earth. So after a about a decade, with changing temps and moisture levels, along with movement of the home when it settles and because of the big difference in temps outside to inside, the hay breaks down into dust and the walls collapse. If your house has a strong framework, it can be remedied, if not it collapses.

It would be much cheaper quicker, thermally efficient and give you hundreds of years life, by using rammed earth or mud bricks. Personally, prefer rammed earth and all the rammed earth homes I've been involved in building, are still perfect after many decades. Built a 2 story rammed earth home in Sth NSW and saw it a couple of weeks ago and it still looks magic after 3 decades, the people who live there now adore it.

Have spent time in rammed earth and adobe buildings that are over 1000 years old and they are wonderful to experience.
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Re: Home automation

Postby HBS Guy » 01 Sep 2018, 14:55

I need to put my house on stumps, adobe will be just too heavy. Expanded concrete bricks possible.

I am going to lift the base of the house at least a metre above soil level and ensure little to no rain reaches the walls. I think it is very doable—there are straw bale houses over 100 years old, will do me! Have to allow the straw to breathe. The straw is just infill, not structural.
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Re: Home automation

Postby HBS Guy » 10 Sep 2018, 11:50

I remember reading about one guy in a mudbrick house: after a period of a decade or two about 1cm of unprotected wall had been eroded. Wall of mudbrick is what, 15cm thick?

The builder I will choose does nothing but strawbale. Have had some initial contact with the builder.

There is some fire danger where I am, grass fire not bushfire, big sands of trees are like 1Km away. Plenty of empty paddocks around. Will plant succulents thickly all around the fencelines and take measure to protect myself and my property from fire: a 75mm thick render means the strawbale is as fireproof as is needed, the render being the width of a brick with mostly cement in the outer layer.

Rot will be prevented by allowing the inside of the walls to breathe.
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