is recycling finished?

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is recycling finished?

Postby johnsmith » 19 Apr 2018, 00:14

Recycling from more than 200,000 residents in Ipswich will go to landfill

The Ipswich City Council says China's import ban on recycling and the rising level of contaminated rubbish in yellow bins means it is too costly to recycle properly, so all its recycling will go straight to the tip.

Mayor Andrew Antoniolli said Ipswich was the latest to be affected by the nationwide issue, and eventually all councils would be impacted by the viability of recycling household waste.

"While it is fair to say the national recycling system broke down sooner than we expected, Ipswich has been looking to the future," he said in a statement.

"I have spoken personally to [Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch] on this issue, and made it clear that we've been backed into a corner on recycling."

He said recycling contractors notified the council the current rate paid to them would skyrocket by $2 million a year if recycling was to continue, which could potentially lead to a rate rise of up to 2 per cent.

On January 1, China stopped accepting 24 categories of solid waste, disrupting the export of more than 600,000 tonnes of material out of Australia each year.

In response, recycling company Visy stopped accepting waste from 22 Victorian regional councils on February 9.

Visy told a parliamentary inquiry into recycling last October that without China buying recycled waste, material would start piling up.

Waste Recycling Industry Association of Queensland chief executive Rick Ralph described Ipswich council's decision as "outrageous".

He said members from the sector met with Cr Antoniolli in December and offered to setup a working group to assess the issues.

"The Mayor agreed that that was potentially a good idea and said that he would reach out to industry in the new year," Mr Ralph said.

"And since that time there has been no connection with industry. All council has done is make it increasingly difficult for us to have any confidence to invest in the sector."

Federal Government must find a national solution'
Ms Enoch expressed disappointment at Ipswich City Council's decision.

"The Newman government's decision to repeal the waste levy in 2012 robbed Queensland of the opportunity to secure investment and growth for our state's waste and recycling industry," she said in a statement.

"Councils are stuck without an opportunity to recycle this waste, which is a terrible outcome for the environment.

"Our Government is in discussions with other Australian states and territories about China's ban on importing recycled material.


China's decision is a national issue for our waste and recycling industry and the Federal Government needs to show leadership to deliver a national solution."

Ipswich Deputy Mayor Wayne Wendt pointed to the ABC Four Corners program on waste last year, saying contamination inside yellow lid recycle bins has since doubled.

"Under the current and previous rates of contamination, waste experts advise it would be almost unachievable to lower the rate of contamination to acceptable levels," he said.

For recycling to continue, he said that meant council would need to halve the amount of pizza boxes, food waste, plastic bags, disposable nappies, grass clippings and garden waste, broken plates, coat hangers, light bulbs, dirty tissues and serviettes, and foam packaging being stuck in yellow bins.

"In a nutshell, this means we're left with no choice but to send yellow lid bins to landfill."

Cr Antoniolli said the council would look to waste-to-energy solutions into the future, but would continue to look for recycling solutions in the meantime.

Brisbane City Councillor Peter Matic said there would be no change to Brisbane's recycling program.

"Brisbane has been recognised as Australia's most sustainable city, which is in part attributed to our best-practice recycling practices," Cr Matic said.

"A total of 93 per cent of materials placed in Brisbane yellow-top bins are able to be recycled, due to an extremely low contamination rate, unlike other local government areas."

Logan City Council told the ABC it remained committed to its recycling program, with Visy under contract until at least 2021.



http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-18/ipswich-recycling-all-being-dumped-in-landfill/9672064





More short sighted stupidity by the government. Instead of building proper recycling plants here decades ago when the whole 'yellow bin' started, they figured it would be cheaper to send the rubbish to china and then buy back the recycled product. .... now chinas not buying, and we have no way of processing it ourselves. Typical government with no long term planning beyond the next election.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby mothra » 19 Apr 2018, 00:26

S'okay. It's not like the planet is in any real danger or anything. No need to get carried away planning out these things.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby pinkeye » 19 Apr 2018, 00:43

mothra wrote:S'okay. It's not like the planet is in any real danger or anything. No need to get carried away planning out these things.


:thumb

sad but true. Good old China... takes all our crap... well fellas.. the tables are about to be turned. CHINA USED TO take our waste plastic. NOW.. it's down to us, the users and abusers.

The only thing we as individuals can do is to use GLASS...where necessary, and paper and Jute, and other natural fibre products, in bags and in all other applications. Take a mug with you wherever you go.
I remember... :roll when there weren't any plastic bags. Brown paper bags were for groceries, and newsprint with greaseproof paper served to wrap all manner of other products, if a string bag wasn't sufficient.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby Squire » 20 Apr 2018, 00:07

High wages in Australia make recycling in Australia unviable.

It could also be a strategic move by China to accommodate their own non-waste products in their manufacturing processes to remove their dependence on foreign waste and counter trade-war effects on Chinese production.

Reminds me of the old joke on garbage trucks. "If dissatisfied with our service, double your garbage back."

China has also done this to the USA and Europe.

It is now probable that more trash will find its way into the oceans.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 00:18

so..? let us change our lazy practices.

It is the ONLY response. Go back to paper and glass and natural fibres.
Produce NO MORE WASTE PLASTIC.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby HBS Guy » 20 Apr 2018, 06:51

China produces enough of its own waste now so don’t want ours.

There are things we can do—high temperature incinerators so the rubbish generates electricity is one. If we had a Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation worthy of the name still solutions could be found.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby johnsmith » 20 Apr 2018, 17:12

Ipswich Council backflips on dumping recycling

The Ipswich City Council, west of Brisbane, says it intends to reverse its decision to send recycling to landfill.

The Council said on Wednesday China's import ban on recycling and the rising level of contaminated or non-recyclable rubbish in yellow bins meant it had become too costly for the city to recycle, so from now everything placed in yellow bins would go straight to landfill.

More than half of the items being placed in Ipswich yellow bins has been unrecyclable waste, and the city's kerbside collections had already been going to landfill for four weeks.

Ipswich Mayor Andrew Antoniolli said the Council was looking to utilise a provision in the Local Government Act which would allow the employment of a short-term recycling contractor.

"We have been upfront with the people of Ipswich, and we have proudly sparked a national debate on council waste management practice. This is an issue of global significance, and our position is strong," he said.

"We have always been intent on calling tenders for waste-to-energy projects in this city, and we're on the front foot when tackling the issue of waste management."

While Cr Antoniolli said it was an interim solution, he said it was now up to the people of Ipswich to ensure they are using their yellow top bins properly.

He said one of the key reasons negotiations with the previous recycling contractor collapsed was due to high contamination levels in their yellow-top bins.

"That means the amount of rubbish in yellow-top bins must be recyclable. At present there are quite simply too many pizza boxes, plastic bags, burger wrappers and other items not fit for recycling," Cr Antoniolli said in an open letter to the people of Ipswich.

"This has never been an issue solely of money. This is a complex series of issues which includes waste contamination, cost, and a vision to the future for our city."


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-20/ipswich-council-backflips-on-dumping-recycling/9681682




good. Now lets hope governments does something to allow councils to keep at it. Better late than never.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby Dax » 20 Apr 2018, 19:14

One product at the present time could replace most plastics and what it can't, glass can. Hemp, it makes beautiful strong materials, paper, rope, cardboard, provides oils and has wonderful medicinal properties. I have a pair of hemp jeans, picked up in the USA decades ago, work in them just about every day at home and they've still got years left they're levi's.

http://levishempjeans.com/

We could recycle everything, even plastic because it can be refined back into oil. My house is built with recycled materials, except for the windows they are double glazed bullet proof and big. I don't pay the councils garbage collection rate because I don't have enough to collect and being the only one on the road, not cost effective.

They should ban all plastic wrapping, containers, packaging and bottles, along with everything sold that doesn't have a minimum ten year lifespan. Then put a deposit on every form of non biodegradable packaging, like glass and metal, that would not only recycle everything, but create industry and jobs to cover the demand in growing and manufacturing.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby johnsmith » 20 Apr 2018, 19:18

Dax wrote:They should ban all plastic wrapping, containers, packaging and bottles,


shits me when they wrap something in 2 or even three layers of plastic wrap .... even more so with pre packed fruit ... what the fuck for? not necessary in the slightest
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby Squire » 20 Apr 2018, 20:08

The only thing that will save the world from the plethora of non-recyclable garbage is the development of enzymes and bacteria to consume the waste and turn it into either biodegradable waste or a valuable material.

Australia has never been good at recycling since the shortage, then the disappearance of rag and bone men like Steptoe and Son.

Perhaps the answer is to revive the rag and bone trade in the UK and import Rag and Bone 'engineers' and their horses and carts into Australia. The UK could become a world leader in the retro rag and bone technology with Australia a proving ground.

Perhaps Donald Trump could start a rag and bone university?
Last edited by Squire on 20 Apr 2018, 22:04, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 21:34

Squire wrote:The only thing that will save the world from the plethora of non-recyclable garbage is the development of enzymes and bacteria to consume the waste and turn it into either biodegradable waste or a valuable material.

Australia has never been good at recycling since the shortage, then the disappearance of rag and bone men like Steptoe and Son.

Perhaps the answer is to revive the raga and bone trade in the UK and import Rag and Bone 'engineers' and their horses and carts into Australia. The UK could become a world leader in the retro rag and bone technology with Australia a proving ground.

Perhaps Donald Trump could start a rag and bone university?



sigh

Funnily enough I found myself humming an old tune the other day. Then I realised it was the theme from Steptoe and Sons TV show.

We'll never see the like again.

and that said.. the sad news, the true news is, there are too many people.!!!
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 21:38

Dax wrote:One product at the present time could replace most plastics and what it can't, glass can. Hemp, it makes beautiful strong materials, paper, rope, cardboard, provides oils and has wonderful medicinal properties. I have a pair of hemp jeans, picked up in the USA decades ago, work in them just about every day at home and they've still got years left they're levi's.

http://levishempjeans.com/

We could recycle everything, even plastic because it can be refined back into oil. My house is built with recycled materials, except for the windows they are double glazed bullet proof and big. I don't pay the councils garbage collection rate because I don't have enough to collect and being the only one on the road, not cost effective.

They should ban all plastic wrapping, containers, packaging and bottles, along with everything sold that doesn't have a minimum ten year lifespan. Then put a deposit on every form of non biodegradable packaging, like glass and metal, that would not only recycle everything, but create industry and jobs to cover the demand in growing and manufacturing.


I agree. BUT.. it is too late.
Just look at recent footage from seas around Indonesia, for one, and Spain for another. It's everywhere.
But even worse is the prevalence of micro-fibres. VSP. Very Small Particles. And we're just seeing the beginning of this . :stop

We can say STOP. But, we've left it too late.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 21:40

I do hope these plastic-eating enzymes .. etc work. at least enough that some life remains on earth. BUT hey what happens when they run out of plastic. ? :roll

Hopefully, they die of starvation, else they might go after other petrochemical products. :bgrin
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby Squire » 20 Apr 2018, 22:28

pinkeye wrote:
Squire wrote:The only thing that will save the world from the plethora of non-recyclable garbage is the development of enzymes and bacteria to consume the waste and turn it into either biodegradable waste or a valuable material.

Australia has never been good at recycling since the shortage, then the disappearance of rag and bone men like Steptoe and Son.

Perhaps the answer is to revive the raga and bone trade in the UK and import Rag and Bone 'engineers' and their horses and carts into Australia. The UK could become a world leader in the retro rag and bone technology with Australia a proving ground.

Perhaps Donald Trump could start a rag and bone university?


sigh

Funnily enough I found myself humming an old tune the other day. Then I realised it was the theme from Steptoe and Sons TV show.

We'll never see the like again.

and that said.. the sad news, the true news is, there are too many people.!!!


I agree that one of the problems is too many people. However, that is only going to get worse with Australia leading the pack on population growth from immigration.

In another string about traffic jams, my solution was to offer closet poms their ten pounds back and send them packing. Ten pounds would double or triple the wealth of Ozpolitic denizens of Valkie's ilk.

In the meantime here's a Steptoe solution:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHhpYeALbh0
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 22:41

Ahhh .. thank you.. that reminds me of years long gone by. :bgrin

And YEP.. that was the tune. :bgrin
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby johnsmith » 21 Apr 2018, 09:24

pinkeye wrote:I do hope these plastic-eating enzymes .. etc work. at least enough that some life remains on earth. BUT hey what happens when they run out of plastic. ?

Hopefully, they die of starvation, else they might go after other petrochemical products.


unfortunately, I don't see any other solution. We weren't going to stop using plastics and population decreases are forecast to be a long way away
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby pinkeye » 21 Apr 2018, 22:38

Squire wrote:In the meantime here's a Steptoe solution:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHhpYeALbh0


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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby johnsmith » 27 Apr 2018, 21:23

FD.
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby johnsmith » 06 May 2018, 10:28

Plastic pollution: it's not just bags at the checkout, what about the plastic clogging supermarket aisles?

Last week I received a marketing email from a major supermarket offering me bonus loyalty points if I purchased a product from its new range for kids' lunchboxes: apple slices and carrot sticks, pre-cut and packaged in plastic.

I did a double take. What sort of environmental vandal came up with that idea?

Since when has chopping an apple become so inconvenient that it needs to be done for us, and packaged in plastic?

Our oceans and coastlines are drowning in plastic litter. Research carried out in 2013 found that the density of plastic in Australian waters is up to 40,000 pieces per square kilometre.

In northern Australia, discarded fishing nets known as "ghost nets" entangle thousands of turtles each year. In April, nearly 30 kilograms of rubbish was found in the gut of a dead sperm whale that washed up on a Spanish beach.

Supermarkets offer too little, too late
Supermarkets regularly defend their wanton use of plastic, claiming it's what customers want — despite the increasing clamour from unhappy shoppers on social media who clearly don't need their bananas wrapped in clingfilm.

So, what's the answer? It's definitely not pre-packaged carrot sticks. Supermarkets and other retailers need to minimise the use of plastic on their side. It's reprehensible that they are being so slow to take action.

After sustained high-profile campaigns to #banthebag in the few remaining states where single-use plastic bags had not already been outlawed, in 2018 the major supermarkets finally announced the end of single-use plastic bags.

Woolworths will phase out single-use plastic bags from June 20, Coles from July 1. ALDI has never provided its customers with single-use plastic bags. Customers who fail to bring their own bag can purchase, for 15 cents, a thicker plastic bag (a "boutique bag") made from a high percentage of recycled materials.

Banning single-use plastic bags clearly has a positive impact. Woolworths says it hands out 3.2 billion single-use plastic bags each year, many of which end up in landfill. In the ACT a review revealed that the number of plastic bags thrown into landfill fell by 36 per cent after the ACT introduced its ban in 2011.

Bags aren't the only problem
But what about the huge volume of plastic found in the supermarket aisles? A quick look around the fresh produce section of the supermarket reveals plenty of plastic encasing apples, pears and bananas. It baffles me why something as hardy as lemongrass needs to be sold in a plastic packet.

A spokesperson for Woolworths said the company knows it still has work to do in reducing plastic across the supply chain:

"In recent months, we have permanently removed plastic from produce lines such as avocado, organic spring onions, celery, kale and English spinach. These moves will help save more than 37 tonnes of packaging on a yearly basis."

Coles pointed me to its REDcycle program:

"[…] the biggest retailer-led recycling initiative of its kind in Australia. Since the program began in 2011, Coles has diverted more than 300 million pieces of flexible plastic from landfill across Australia."

We have the solutions
As we contend with a recycling crisis in Australia, it all feels like too little, too late. China's recent ban on importing recyclable waste led to many waste contractors refusing to accept recyclables.

Now, faced with soaring bills, some councils are considering dumping kerbside recycling — Ipswich City Council announced their intention in late April, but then retracted it following public outcry.

Some, like the Greens, argue manufacturers and retailers need to take more responsibility for the lifecycle of their packaging. "Product stewardship" and extended producer responsibility (EPR) requires manufacturers to factor the disposal of packaging into its design and production.

Other solutions to the waste crisis include charging more to dump waste in landfill or offering subsidies to increase the capacity of the local recycling sector.

A better option is to consume less plastic. "Precycling" minimises waste by reducing consumption. In practice this means packing your shopping in reusable bags, using a reusable cup for your takeaway coffee, buying items free from packaging — and putting a whole apple in our kids' lunchboxes.

What supermarkets could do
One supermarket in the Netherlands recently introduced a plastic-free aisle stocked with 700 products including fruit and vegetables, meat and pantry items.

Ekoplaza CEO Erik Does told the Guardian:

"We know that our customers are sick to death of products laden in layer after layer of thick plastic packaging. Plastic-free aisles are a really innovative way of testing the compostable biomaterials that offer a more environmentally friendly alternative to plastic packaging."

Retailers in Australia could show this sort of leadership.

While we wait for supermarkets to catch up, as consumers, we must stop throwing out so much plastic. We can draw a line in the sand and make sustainability our priority, not convenience.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-06/plastic-recycling-supermarket-plastic-bags/9723780


Some good points. I don't understand why supermarkets don't provide paper bags for fruit and vege's like they already do for mushrooms, instead of plastic. It's a very simple solution and would be a great and very easy start
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Re: is recycling finished?

Postby johnsmith » 25 May 2018, 08:24

reading this earlier and found this extract very interesting. Maybe there is some hope for humanity afterall


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-25/vivid-algae-lights-up-sydney/9797628


And he said there's huge potential to use algae to soak up carbon emissions and transform industry.

UTS PhD candidate Shawn Price is working to develop a biodegradable plastic using algae, which he hopes to make a reality in the next three years.

"Inside algae cells there are a whole range of molecules," he said.

"And there are special molecules called polymers that are very, very useful for plastic products.

"And so what I'm trying to do is take these naturally occurring biopolymers and turn them into plastic products that biodegrade in the environment."

Mr Price said the plastic resin he was designing could degrade within a month, meaning everyday items such as milk bottles could one day be made from the plastic.

"It's definitely technically feasible," he said. "The main issue is bringing the cost down so it's cheap enough and affordable enough to replace petrochemical plastics."
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