Brewing beer

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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 14 Sep 2018, 11:42

OK. It is no big deal. Some airlocks come with a cap to prevent mozzie hari kari.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 15 Sep 2018, 15:49

OG 1.038 on Wednesday midday, SG now 1.013, Saturday midday.
3 days and it is close to reaching 10.0095, which is the calculated OG. It rocketed through the last stalling point of 1.020.
This is close to what the manufacturers of nottinnghams yeast says it can do. My process must be quite good.
Wort looked cloudy and calmer. Yeast still working but slowing down. Tasted balanced, nice undertones of maltiness.

Main difference in my procedure was the oxygenating of the wort before adding the yeast.
Minor differences were: i) Change in type of beer booster. (extra malty blend)
ii) Rinsed fermenter, airlock, tap and O-ring in cooled boiled water after sanatizer use.
iii) Smoothed out manufacturing imperfections in airlock and fermenter.

Good advice HBS, aerating the wort has made a leap forward.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 15 Sep 2018, 16:21

Keep it all sterile and it does sound like a winner.

Keep the malt content up, ideally 750g dry malt, 250g dextrose. Get the hang of the little boil and we can build bloody nice beers on that foundation.

Buy a 5Kg bag light dried malt extract and 2Kg bags of Muntons amber, wheat and dark and a Kg bag dextrose and make up your own packs.

Try a wheat beer, try a stout with the dark DME, try a lovely rich ale with the amber DME.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 18 Sep 2018, 00:08

Bubbling once every 10 seconds, SG = 1.011.
Target is 1.0095 according to your method.
Fermenting has slowed a lot but still bubbling so still fermenting.
Tasted pretty darned nice, used a dark malt mix.
Monday night now, I think the fermenting is pretty much done really. Taken 5 1/2 days.
OG 1.038 on Wednesday midday, SG was 1.013, Saturday midday. SG 1.011 monday night

SG movement has slowed a lot. Still bubbling, not reached target and not a stable SG reading over a 3 day period.
Don't bottle yet, wait. It is close though. I am thinking by Wednesday it should be ok to bottle
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Sep 2018, 05:53

When ferment has finished, turn the temperature down, let it sit 2-3 days. Cleaner beer, clearer without a lot of yeast.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Sep 2018, 05:59

I made an OG 1140 Scottish 140/- (shilling) Ale. It went down to 1055 and I bottled it at that.

That is how the Scots used to drink their beer. I guess all that sugar left in the ale helped fight the cold. Interesting but I would not do it again.

I used Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale yeast. If I wanted to make this again I would pitch a couple packets Nattingham when the 1728 stopped.

I put it in the club competition but it didn’t do well. There is something called the Beer Judge Certification Program, BJCP, that is destroying interest in historical beer. The BJCP sets out definitions for beer styles but it has become a straight jacket. Any clown can copy and paste from the BJCP website and think he knows beer styles.

For example Mild (Mild Ale, a less hopped English beer style) must be dark and no more than 3.5%abv. Garbage. I have seen a historical recipe (Durden Park Beer Circle) for Mild that was 7Kg of pale malt—strong, close to 7%abv, and pale! Hop it lightly—you have a mild. Put that into a competition and the Judges might like it but score it down as “not to style!”
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby greggerypeccary » 18 Sep 2018, 09:40

I drank a few local beers while I was in the UK.

Some were very nice.

They don't serve them very cold, though :sad
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Sep 2018, 10:38

Generally, we serve beers way too cold.

Except in summer I do not refrigerate my beer. Commercial brews here are served really cold to hide the fact they have no flavor.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 18 Sep 2018, 11:01

yes, I prefer my beers above refrigerator temp.
Probably about 9 - 12 degrees or so, at a guess.

the fridge temp reduces the tastebuds sensitivity.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby greggerypeccary » 18 Sep 2018, 11:10

Nah.

Can't handle warm beer.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Sep 2018, 16:52

A really good beer let it warm to 13°C—cellar temperature. You will taste the malt a lot more and other more subtle flavors.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 18 Sep 2018, 18:32

Had a thought, though an airlock not bubbling is not a sign it is ready to bottle, is it fair to say that ..........

........... An airlock bubbling shows it is not ready to bottle yet?


Yes, I find the temperature of beer being drunk is very important.
After all, for Greg fridge temp is best by a long way.
For HBS and me, quite a lot warmer than that.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Sep 2018, 18:40

A rough guide: if it is getting warmer or you disturbed it in some way, say by taking a hydrometer sample, you could be seeing dissolved CO2 coming out of solution. Use your hydrometer to determine end of the ferment, taste the hydrometer sample etc then use the airlock as a bit of a guide is fine.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 20 Sep 2018, 11:31

Bottled last batch, FG = 1.008. OG was 1.038. We calculated a FG = 1.0095. 3 days before bottling day SG was 1.011.
Bubbling had stopped. Initially bubbled once every 4 - 5 seconds for days, then went to every 9 seconds. Then abruptly stopped.
I'ld like to see a chart of the airlock bubbling frequency.
This could be a nice brew. Coopers sparkling LME with a maltier DME dextrose/malt mix.
Tasted nice, smelt a touch more maltier than the usual Coopers sparkling.
Again I ran out of carbonation drops, used 1 1/2 teaspoons of raw sugar instead. Used white sugar last time, it went ok.
Takes me 2 hours to bottle.
Broke the hygrometer last night, will buy another.

Will do another batch of coopers dark beer next time. That is my fav.

Went through a list of the improvements I have made since brew #1.

i) Using Glass bottles
ii) Not using chemical sanatizer on bottles. Sun sanatizing after a 2 stage cleaning process.
iii) Rinsing chemical sanatizer off the fermenter, tap, O-Ring and lid before using it.
iv) Buying a good yeast
v) Hydrating the yeast
vi) Aerating the wort.
vii) Improving the seal around the airlock and lid.
vii) Fermenting temp reduced to 20 degrees.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 20 Sep 2018, 14:00

Yup, getting there, Sprinty!
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 20 Sep 2018, 14:14

They did not say it was all this work on the can when I bought the kit . No way.
They had printed on the can of LME ' Step 1 ...... , step 2 ..........., step 3 ............ . Enjoy the best beer you have ever had.'
I kid you not.

Lets see, using the 'easy' method I use.
1 hour buying a can of LME, bag of DME mix, carb drops, whatever else I need.
3 hours to put a brew down. Mixing sanatizers, boiling water, taking temperatures, aerating ...................
Check it 5 or so times in the next week to see how it is fermenting.
About 3 hours cleaning/sanatizing the bottles, this goes in 3 stages.
2 hours bottling, adding carb drops, a filler tube that drips, walking to and fro with various things weighing many kgs..

What is that ........ call it 10 hours.
That is assuming all things proceed well.

Oh yes, then, don't drink it for 3 weeks ............. AS IF !!!!!!!
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 20 Sep 2018, 14:37

Anything worthwhile takes time.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 21 Sep 2018, 13:39

Reread Lallemands instructions for rehydrating their yeast.
They say it is 'quite simple'.
I have not been doing it right.
I have not been weighing the water.
I got the water to 30 - 35 degrees, then let it cool slowly to about the wort temp over 20 minutes.

How do I keep water at 30 --> 35 degrees for 20 minutes ?

................
1) Sprinkle the yeast on the surface of 10 times its weight in clean, sterilized water at 30-35°C (86-95F). Do not use wort, or distilled or reverse osmosis water, as loss in viability will result. DO NOT STIR.
2) Leave undisturbed for 15 minutes, then stir to suspend yeast completely, and leave it for 5 more minutes at 30-35°C.
3) Then adjust temperature to that of the wort and inoculate without delay.
4) Attemperate in steps at 5-minute intervals of 10°C to the temperature of the wort by mixing aliquots of wort.
5) Do not allow attemperation to be carried out by natural heat loss. This will take too long and could result in loss of viability or vitality.
6) Temperature shock, at greater than 10°C, will cause formation of petite mutants leading to long-term or incomplete fermentation and possible formation of undesirable flavors.
7) Nottingham yeast has been conditioned to survive rehydration. The yeast contains an adequate reservoir of carbohydrates and unsaturated fatty acids to achieve active growth.
8) It is unnecessary to aerate wort upon first use.
9) When using Lallemand Brewing Yeasts, you may repitch the yeast just as you would any other type of yeast according to your brewery’s SOP for yeast handling.

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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 21 Sep 2018, 14:08

I never bothered about attemperation or any of that.

10x the weight of yeast, at 40°C of clean boiled tap water: NOTE: the hot water tap is NEVER to be used except maybe early in the cleaning process. The temperature of the hot water allows bacteria to grow

Sprinkle yeast on top.

Let stand 15-30 minutes, stir.

120ml water + yeast into 22L lukewarm wort is OK. Less fucking around with the yeast the better in my view.

Commercial brewers pour multiples of tens of litres of yeast susension into their worts, attemperation may be needed there.

Don’t overthink it. Fermenting beer is a robust liquid, well able to squash any bugs, well able to grow yeast populations to HUGE numbers.

Plenty malt, good aeration and pitch enough yeast and things rarely go wrong.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 21 Sep 2018, 14:26

Rehydration.

Dried yeast has so little water in it you can store it in the freezer. 8°C is recommended—as long as you keep the yeast in your fridge.

Rehydration goes by osmosis: the “skin” of the cells of yeast lets water in—it is a semipermeable membrane. Water goes in because the cell interior is a much more concentrated solution than clean tap water that has a little bit of mineral ions in it. Adding sugar or wort to the rehydration wort decreases the osmotic pressure differential and hence the rehydration is not as complete as with plain water.

The cells come to life, so to speak, and spend some time repairing their cell walls using the carbohydrates the yeast company packed into them before freeze drying. These cell walls were creased etc by the freeze drying. Hence, again, adding wort is of no benefit—the yeast aren’t hungry yet, if their cells walls can’t be repaired the cell will die.

When the cell is all recovered from the freeze drying and rehydration then sugars and other nutrients, amino acids, vitamins etc can enter the cell and the cell can metabolise them. So don’t leave the yeast in the rehydration water for a couple of hours!

The yeast just floats in the wort: it is a single celled fungus. It doesn’t go “hunting” sugars, it just collides with them, absorbs them, metabolise them. This is why stirring up the yeast cake sometimes restarts a stuck ferment.

The yeast belches out CO2 and pisses out alcohol :rofl :rofl :rofl

Alcohol is a poison to the yeast: fermenting a REALLY big beer or mead etc takes some effort. I re-aerated my big worts twice a day for 3 days, with oxygen in the wort the yeast reproduce. Sometimes we will boil up the yeast from a really old packet etc—the yeast cells rupture and the contents of the cells are available to your yeast, etc. DiAmmoniumPhosphate is used—adds nitrogen needed for protein for cell structures etc. Anything up to OG 1080 doesn’t need much extra care so 1040–1050 is OK with good yeast and plenty malt.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 27 Sep 2018, 13:41

How much sugar ?

I have been using 2 carbonation drops per tallie. That seems ok
Then during some bottling I ran out of drops, so used 1 + 1/2 teaspoons of sugar. That seemed ok.
Next batch, ran out of drops , so used 1 + 1/2 teaspoons of raw sugar.
Researched on the net, they say 3.5 gms of sugar per 750 gms.
I checked with some scales. Using a teaspoon it is really hard to get consistent weights.
Using a specific measuring spoon I can do 3 gms repeatedly. It is a less than a 1 and 1/2 teaspoons. More like a teaspoon.

These are all level teaspoons, not rounded or heaped.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 27 Sep 2018, 13:53

When you get another batch or two under your belt we will do away with carbonation drops and sugar, dissolve/boil some dried wheat malt extract, add that to the beer in your bottling bucket, stir, bottle.

Gives your beer a nice head, easier and quicker than measuring sugar. I wouldn’t know if I still have my sugar measure anywhere, I did bulk priming as I described.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 28 Sep 2018, 12:25

HBS Guy wrote:When you get another batch or two under your belt we will do away with carbonation drops and sugar, dissolve/boil some dried wheat malt extract, add that to the beer in your bottling bucket, stir, bottle.

Gives your beer a nice head, easier and quicker than measuring sugar. I wouldn’t know if I still have my sugar measure anywhere, I did bulk priming as I described.


That is practicable with my setup. I have a jug downstairs for boiling water in, can boil water in there, tip it into a stainless steel pot.
I assume you mix it in pretty well using the big spoon. It won't stir up the yeast cake in the bottom too much will it ? Other people do it.
Can see this method being more accurate, uniform and easier to prime 23 litres in one mix, rather than prime 27 individual bottles.

Will a dried light malt extract make any difference over a dried dark malt extract ?
I prefer the darker maltier 'weight'. Used dark beer booster in my last batch of coopers sparkling ale to give it a bit more colour.
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby Sprintcyclist » 28 Sep 2018, 15:17

Ahah - next batch I can prime as normal bottle by bottle. Do 1/2 the bottles with raw sugar, other 1/2 with DME.

Is how I have sorted out my sanatizing method.
Prob want more carbonation in the lighter beer, fewer bubble in the maltier one.



........ Knowing that dextrose can cause tart, apple like flavors when used in a malt bill, I wondered. I decided to carb a batch with DME and the flavor/feel was gone. So I decided to split a batch of one of my regular brews, an APA, half got DME and half got corn sugar to carb. Guess what?! Yep! It was for sure the corn sugar causing this flavor/feel.
The way I describe the difference is that the corn sugar left my beers just a bit off of what I knew they should be, just thin and sometimes tart in the finish. This went away with using DME to prime. My keg beer always tasted great, just like I hoped, and on par with commercial craft beer, but my bottles while being good, just lacked something.
With DME, the co2 bubbles seem tighter and more like a bottled brand of beer. The head was thicker and more dense, and the retention improved. And best off, the thin aftertaste/feel, which was something that was really turning me off of bottling, was gone.
I'd recommend giving it a try, maybe split a batch and do half w/DME and half w/corn sugar, and see what you think. .........



https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/carbonation-dextrose-vs-dme.330605/
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Re: Brewing beer

Postby HBS Guy » 28 Sep 2018, 18:46

I think that guy is being a bit of a wanker. But DME, preferably wheat, is the way to go.
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