Gardening

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Re: Gardening

Postby pinkeye » 06 Feb 2019, 02:21

HBS Guy wrote:What does that mean?


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paying the bills
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 10 Feb 2019, 17:19

Oh boy.

Been thinking, again, dangerous I know. Going to trim the number of cider apple trees to 8: 2 bitter sharp, 4 bittersweet, 2 tarts. That gives me 4 spare spaces, plant them with semi dwarf perry pears! Row 5 will have 3 more semi dwarf perry pears. One perry pear is Beurre bosc—it is an eating/cooking apple but gives a nice pear-fruity flavor to a perry so is included in the list of perry pears. Needs to be pollinated by Williams pear. So, instead of planting a bb in one hole and a Williams in another I will plant two bb and a W in the one hole. Will keep the trees small through root competition. One of the perry pears also needs a culinary pear for pollination, 2 of the perry pear + the pollinator in the one hole.

I might do the planting in the same hole with other cider and perry trees.

Row 4 is superfluous in this new plan, bar planting currants etc which like shade. Row 5 is 5 metres from Row 3, keeping the 5m spacing.

Perfect!

Why didn’t I do this originally? Hadn’t thought of perry to be honest. Then was going to buy dwarf perry pears which were all that were on offer as far as I knew.

I think I was choosing cider apples just to fill up the spots. Sweet Coppin and Brown Snout—pffft, do away with them. Any culinary apple will dilute a too–sharp or too-bitter cider and if I have Yarlington Mill I don’t need no Brown Snout second rate bittersweet. That reduces the number of cider trees to 10. Do I need two Dabinette bittersweets? With 4 Yarlington Mill bittersweets? Doubt it! (or keep one and have one tart + granny smith somewhere else.)

So: Two Breakwell’s Seedling bittersharp, four Yarlington Mill bittersweets and two tarts, two King David or maybe one King David and a French tart, ehehehe.

So, next to the cider apples: one each Gin, Yellow Huffcap, Green Horse and Moorcroft, in Row 5 Beurre bosc x 2 + Williams then two other perry pears/perry pear combinations. Nice mix cider apples, nice mix cider/perry.

Might investigate more 2 trees in one hole possibilities—helps pollination, helps keep the trees small without me needing to prune to control size and allows more trees in the same area.

Yarlington Mill is rather biannual, huge crop one year slim pickings the next.
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Re: Gardening

Postby hatty » 11 Feb 2019, 07:55

more sentimental shit from hatty.

gardening at night

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egnn2BkJnA4

apologies if it adds little to the thread.....couldn't help myself
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 11 Feb 2019, 13:36

Visited an op shop, bought a book on wisteria, one on tea roses one on old fashioned roses and a few more.

Took them to the counter.volunteer started adding up the prices, got tired and asked “$10 OK?” OK by me! Before putting them in the car I added up the prices, $18. $8 saving is nice, pays for a bottle of Coopers!
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 12 Feb 2019, 18:41

Hmmm fukkit!

Can’t find a source of semidwarf pears in Tasmania :sad

Well, can plant a lot more dwarf trees, 2m apart, espalier them. Dwarf trees, unlike semi dwarf, need to be supported their whole short life, espalier is one way of doing that. Semi dwarf is more vigorous, more disease resistant etc etc but what the fuck can you do when no semidwarf stock is available?

I am SURE I saw “medium” perry pear trees somewhere in a Tassy website. Hmmm try searching on that!
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Feb 2019, 09:47

Last month I paid my outrageous council rates. I asked them how come I pay half of what Mum pays on her 20x more valuable property. No answer was the stern reply. I thought “fuck that, will send a follow up and I did, CCing all councillors.

Got a reply from a councillor. She wasn’t happy with the rate increase but:

I did not support the rating increase myself but have to accept the decision of the council.
The people in the village areas got an increase of $57 which to me as an individual was very excessive.


That would be $57 per quarter.

So today I had to pay TasWater. $185/qrtr when Mum pays less than twice that:
Or do you and the Tasmanian government WANT to keep Tasmania as a joke of a state with the main cities of Slowbart and Inceston? That is what rip off rates and discouraging people to hold onto building blocks is doing!

I even have to pay fucking land tax on my $30,000 block of land! Other states don’t charge that unless the value is like $500,000!
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Re: Gardening

Postby Agness » 14 Mar 2019, 00:01

So much love in a garden will be coming back to finish my stroll soon and I don't think raw quince is that bad- a bit dry but that's it !
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 14 Mar 2019, 06:54

If I can find space I might buy a Smyrna quince tree, plant it with Beurre Bosc, Williams and another pear.

Make quince paste to eat with some nice Tassie cheese.

No figs tho, soil is WAY too alkaline to plant in the garden. but could plant two figs in a big, wide container, keep the size of the trees under control. That will be once the house is built and cleaners rubbish removed etc. I suppose I could give them a start by planting into 20L buckets, burying them with the rim 2-3cm above the soil and the buckets filled with good, slightly acid soil. Need to give them plenty of sun, providing a warm enough spot will be the biggest challenge. Too big to put in my conservatory? Make a polytunnel?
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Re: Gardening

Postby Agness » 14 Mar 2019, 08:29

The fig was one of my mother's favourite fruit I just think they are very sweet - I tend like a slight tartness about most fruit- my dad was a very prolific gardener and as we lived on acreage as kids his gardens were pretty big vegie gardens watered by a system of irrigation- they were funny days rounding up the cow to milk and after all that effort to catch the cow- she would kick the bucket of milk flying if she got her leg loose- wasted lot of milk at first but you would not believe the cream she gave- it was thick rich and premium- no pasteurisation and yet none of us became sick- she was very contrary and dad would have to round her up with the jeep- :rofl :rofl :rofl
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Re: Gardening

Postby Sprintcyclist » 14 Mar 2019, 22:48

rain, we got rain tonight
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Mar 2019, 07:50

OK, everything is coming together.

Have someone to rotary hoe the five rows and to drill holes and insert posts: The perry pears will be grown espaliered, branches trained horizontally along wires. A wooden post every four metres with a long star dropper in between the posts. The pears are dwarf trees and so need support all their life.

Two rows of 4 cider apple trees—semi dwarf, only need support for 2-3 years.

Heh, read something: the early flowerers (and leafers) should be on the southern end of a row—they will get the sun they need through the bare branches of the later flowerers. The way I had them the early flowerers would have blocked the sun from the later ones.

Row 3 will have 8 cherry trees in two groups of 4: root competition keeps the trees small, still get a good harvest. Early Burlat, starts ripening December so cherries for Christmass—and to sell to the tourists. Napoleon, lighter colored cherries, not as sweet as the dark skinned ones, Stella to pollinate and Kentish Sour to make jam etc with. Then eating/cooking/cider apples also in groups of 4. Two Brown Snouts will give me some Brown Snout bittersweets—Brown Snout is a nice enough cider apple and a regular heavy producer. Two Sweet Coppin, makes a nice sweet cider or use it to blend a too-bitter or too-sharp cider. Sturmin Pippin—great cooking and great cider apples, two Cox Orange Pippin, incredible eating apples and any surplus/marked COPs can go to cider etc. Four stone fruits, peaches plums, a small tree will provide enough fruit. One tree for eating, ripens in Jan, another ripens in Feb, good for preserving. Same, an eating plum and a preserving plum.

Can make apple butter! Yum!

Any fruit not wanted for cider or perry or preserving—I will have a press, press the fruit, make country wine or a melomel.

I will want citrus: lemon tree, maybe a lime, a couple blood orange trees for marmalade but these need sheltered positions—so after my house is built.
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 18 Mar 2019, 15:56

and still no tomatoes?


thats why you Dutch will never amount to anything :clap
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Mar 2019, 16:04

I will have a greenhouse to get tomatoes germinated, that obviously will won’t be until I am living there.

Vege patch in the front garden, done no-till, flowering border between house and “orchard.” There will be a hedge of grevillias in front of the fruit trees.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 23 Mar 2019, 14:54

Since Mum won’t travel to Tasmania I decided to buy a GoPro camera so I could take video of the journey there, of the work on the block and of walks around the town etc.

Good fun.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 30 Mar 2019, 17:55

MUST buy some pair of rubber gloves. I KNEW I had read about “orchardist paste” in one of my orchard books. Did a search on Google: it put up an image of a page of one of my books: “Holistic Orchard Management.” Seems it is actually called “Biodynamic paste” and it is a mix of Surround™ very fine kaolin—and cow shit! Well, cow manure. Provides essential microbes it seems. So, not a job for bare hands!
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 03 Apr 2019, 12:50

OK, 20 bales of pea straw and 10 bags of sheep shit will be delivered to my block this week. Week after next I will be working that block

Sheep shit is cheaper than compost but I will have to have a few cubic metres of compost delivered too. Will also buy blocks of oyster mushroom compost, nice and acid, great for my too–alkaline soil. Might rake up the pine chips for spreading, if time permits, where the raspberries will go.

First day on the block, peg out my rows, including the additional row and dig up the little star droppers I buried to help repeg the rows and trees last April. Second day, need to go pick up a bag of Surround. Spread the mushroom compost where the trees will go so when the rows are rotary hoed the compost will be distributed through the soil. See how far I get with that anyway. Monday will also go and get more gypsum, can’t add too much gypsum to clay soils: it removes excess magnesium and the effect of gypsum on clay only lasts around three years.

Keeping the clay covered is the main concern: dig or rotary hoe the clay, spread gypsum thickly, leave it over winter and then dig the soil and then keep it covered with mulch, 50–100mm (2-4".) That stops the pounding rain and baking sun making the soil worse. The moist soil (clay really holds on to water) hosts earthworms and a myriad of other soil critters start turning your clay into soil. Keep the soil covered, replenish the mulch as it is eaten by the critters and rotted by fungi etc.

I had my 5 rows covered with pine chips: these are acid, good for my rather alkaline soil but pine puts tannins in the soil, unfriendly to other plants. Hence I might rake them up since I have other mulch coming. But they have protected and, hopefully, acidified my soil a bit and not put too many tannins in the soil: pine tannins tend to prevent other plants from growing. Think it will be OK, the chips have not been there that long and stuff doesn’t move through clay quickly.
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 03 Apr 2019, 15:43

hey monk

my vege patch is looking a bit barren

what do you suggest I plant coming into winter?

Try to keep in mind that it's not going to snow here anytime soon. Our winters are fairly mild :roll
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 03 Apr 2019, 16:18

No idea about subtropical.
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 03 Apr 2019, 16:38

HBS Guy wrote:No idea about subtropical.



you have a few weeks to look into it. I'm not in a rush :rofl
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 03 Apr 2019, 16:39

Ima kinda busy with cool temperate gardening, John :roll :bgrin
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 03 Apr 2019, 16:42

HBS Guy wrote:Ima kinda busy with cool temperate gardening, John :roll :bgrin



I understand. Take your time :c
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 03 Apr 2019, 17:00

Buy a Gardening Australia (or the organic mag) and look up what you can plant you lazy bugger!
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 03 Apr 2019, 18:51

HBS Guy wrote:Buy a Gardening Australia (or the organic mag) and look up what you can plant you lazy bugger!


to much effort. It's much easier to ask you :c :c
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 03 Apr 2019, 18:54

Easier to ask, maybe, getting an answer more difficult. Deciding if advice is truthful aye, there’s the rub!
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 03 Apr 2019, 19:32

HBS Guy wrote:Easier to ask, maybe, getting an answer more difficult. Deciding if advice is truthful aye, there’s the rub!



ahh, it's only a few plants.

If they fruit, a bonus, if they fail, we live and learn. I won't blame you. I understand we're both learning as we go :bgrin
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