Consequences of AGW

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Expand view Topic review: Consequences of AGW

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 06 Aug 2018, 21:10

Earth's Soil Is Hyperventilating Thanks To Climate Change
Earth's soil contains roughly twice as much CO2 as Earth's atmosphere — and it's escaping faster and faster.
Credit: Getty
You know it's hot out there when even the soil is hyperventilating.

According to a new study published yesterday (Aug. 1) in the journal Nature, there's about twice as much carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in Earth's soil as there is floating around the atmosphere, and for the last few decades, that underground greenhouse gas has been leaking out at a significantly increased rate.

Based on more than 2,000 sources of climate data taken from ecosystems around the world, a team of soil scientists found that the rate of CO2 released from Earth's soil has increased globally by about 1.2 percent in just 25 years — and you can blame that on hot, hungry microbes.

"We're talking about a huge quantity of carbon," study co-author Vanessa Bailey, a soil scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Washington state, said in a statement. "Microbes exert an outsize influence on the world that is very hard to measure on such a large scale."

The breathing Earth
Dirt doesn't actually breathe, of course, but it sort of looks that way when tiny, underground organisms help release the CO2 stored in plant roots, dead leaves and other natural detritus. Hungry microbes gorge on the tasty carbon stored in this plant matter, and then release carbon dioxide as a natural byproduct of this feeding, just as you do when you exhale after a deep breath.

This process is known as "soil respiration," and it's an important complement to photosynthesis — the process by which plants turn CO2, water and light into energy — helping to keep ecosystems around the world running smoothly.

But lately, researchers have found that as global temperatures rise, microbes in the soil have been releasing CO2 faster than plants can snatch it up again. Previous studies have indicated that tree roots and certain microbes both respire more frequently at higher temperatures (up until a certain point, when the intense heat causes the organisms to stop functioning completely). But the exact effects of that increase in respiration had never been studied on a global scale until now.

To better understand the potential links between rising global temperatures and soil respiration, a team of researchers led by Ben Bond-Lamberty at the Joint Global Change Research Institute at the University of Maryland, College Park, examined data from two huge global nature surveys: the Global Soil Respiration Database and FLUXNET, which collectively draw soil, temperature, rainfall and other data from a network of more than 2,000 sources across several ecosystems.

The data showed that the rate of global soil respiration had increased by about 1.2 percent in the 25-year window between 1990 and 2014. Most of that growth was due to increased microbial action; the tiny creatures in Earth's soil are freeing more and more greenhouse gases from our planet's surface.


https://www.livescience.com/63243-soil-respiration-hyperventilation.html

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 06 Aug 2018, 18:38

New Study Finds Sea Level Rise Accelerating
Global sea level rise has been accelerating in recent decades, rather than increasing steadily, according to a new study based on 25 years of NASA and European satellite data.


This acceleration, driven mainly by increased melting in Greenland and Antarctica, has the potential to double the total sea level rise projected by 2100 when compared to projections that assume a constant rate of sea level rise, according to lead author Steve Nerem. Nerem is a professor of Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder, a fellow at Colorado's Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), and a member of NASA's Sea Level Change team.

If the rate of ocean rise continues to change at this pace, sea level will rise 26 inches (65 centimeters) by 2100 -- enough to cause significant problems for coastal cities, according to the new assessment by Nerem and colleagues from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland; CU Boulder; the University of South Florida in Tampa; and Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. The team, driven to understand and better predict Earth’s response to a warming world, published their work Feb. 12 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"This is almost certainly a conservative estimate," Nerem said. "Our extrapolation assumes that sea level continues to change in the future as it has over the last 25 years. Given the large changes we are seeing in the ice sheets today, that's not likely."


https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/new-study-finds-sea-level-rise-accelerating

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 30 Jul 2018, 06:16

Main problem is across the road, overgrown land, pines, gorse etc. Dunno if that gets cleaned before summer. Rest is just grass.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by pinkeye » 30 Jul 2018, 01:58

IF you don't have a dwelling there, then you might as well forget fire issues.
Of course you need to manage weeds and other woody stuff, but if there is no recent history of bushfire, in your area, there is NO point in worrying about it.

If you aren't THERE there is nothing you can do, and different choices of plantings are most unlikely to have any beneficial effect. No person?
Let it burn, and fix it up afterwards.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by pinkeye » 30 Jul 2018, 01:28

HBS Guy wrote:The heat did spread to the West, West heating up again, wild fires raging:

“The West is burning, and it’s barely July

The heat is breaking temperature records coast-to-coast, drought covers half of the country, and — sure enough — wildfires are already enveloping the West. More than 30 large fires are burning in 12 states right now.

In Utah, dozens of homes have been destroyed and hundreds more are threatened from a largely out-of-control blaze in the eastern part of the state. In Colorado, some of the largest fires in state history have already drawn comparisons to the nightmare fire seasons of 1988 and 2002.

And then there’s California, where the “County fire” began on Saturday near Sacramento and quickly spread out of control, threatening hundreds of homes and growing at a rate of 1,000 football fields an hour. It’s the latest megafire in a state still recovering from the most damaging wildfire season in history.

Wildfires across California have burned more than twice the five-year average so far this year, as of July 1. The County fire alone has burned 70,000 acres — twice the size of San Francisco and more than every other fire in the state this year combined. Over the weekend, smoke and ash from the fire drifted over the Bay Area, reminding residents of last year’s horrific blazes and partially blocking out the sun…”


https://grist.org/article/the-west-is-burning-and-its-barely-july/

Yeah, we have had bushfires in August!

I am thinking of ways to protect my place in Tassie from bush and grass fires: sprinklers, hoses, plenty green plants like comfrey, pigface daisies, lemon balm etc. Lots of green, fruit trees, berry and current bushes, herbs, flowers, veges.



I understand the feeling. My place is bush-covered... with tall tall gums as well.

Best guide is to talk to locals... BUT... not enough these days when unprecedented weather events are happening all over.

There is a mob that makes and sells roof-based sprinkler systems specifically intended for defense against bushfires.That only works when you have town water... otherwise you are reliant on waterpumps, .. and the power will likely go out so then you need a generator etc.

It becomes complicated, so I commend your non-tech approach.... BUT.... we have to face facts.

Dry vegetation burns.


So
..



make sure you do not have vegetation growing up against your house. No mulched garden beds and rockeries... it should all be kept at at least 20 metres from your house walls. I confess that over the years I have allowed my trees to grow closer... too close, really. But you must have a space around your property.. if branches fall, make sure they won't fall on your house.


If you are on tank water, as I am, make sure you have lots of water stored ..in house tanks. Then , a fire-fighting pump becomes useful.

Also, knowledge of surrounding water sources... be they creeks dams or even swimming pools in neighbours properties. Be aware. And good luck.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by pinkeye » 30 Jul 2018, 00:48

Yes it's a worry. Greece is burning......California has barely gotten through the last lot of fires, and now they're back again.

Europe has been suffering a heatwave.

And so have we.

It's been above 25' degrees here the last few days. In the middle of winter.
And it is DRY.!

Am writing this because have just had a brief but sweet shower... love hearing rain on the roof. :bgrin

BUT ...............

WE are in for a hellish summer... especially if El Nino develops. Cripes. :OMG

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 28 Jul 2018, 12:22

California’s Fires Are Creating Volcanic Clouds
All three of the state’s major blazes are making rare pyrocumulus clouds right now



The speed with which pyrocumulus clouds form and change, combined with the heat of the fire, can lead to quick, massive temperature swings in the atmosphere, producing unpredictable and severe winds. These can exacerbate the intensity of wildfires, and cause them to move or otherwise behave in unpredictable ways. And that all can put the lives of firefighters and the public at risk.


https://www.outsideonline.com/2330891/california-wildfire-pyrocumulus-clouds

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 23 Jul 2018, 06:40

11 wildfires are burning inside the Arctic Circle. Norway, Sweden, Siberia. There were wildfires earlier in Alaska. Not surprising given the heatwage gripping nearly all the northern hemisphere and a fair bit of the south. And idiots are still talking of a miniiceage, pointing to some cold events here without, I reckon in many cases, realising it is winter here! Those who believe the scammers are not very bright, maybe are damaged in some way or are frightened by the thought of AGW, along come some smooth talking scoundrels talking of a miniiceage and they believe them and send the scoundrels money!

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 06 Jul 2018, 00:13

The heat did spread to the West, West heating up again, wild fires raging:

“The West is burning, and it’s barely July

The heat is breaking temperature records coast-to-coast, drought covers half of the country, and — sure enough — wildfires are already enveloping the West. More than 30 large fires are burning in 12 states right now.

In Utah, dozens of homes have been destroyed and hundreds more are threatened from a largely out-of-control blaze in the eastern part of the state. In Colorado, some of the largest fires in state history have already drawn comparisons to the nightmare fire seasons of 1988 and 2002.

And then there’s California, where the “County fire” began on Saturday near Sacramento and quickly spread out of control, threatening hundreds of homes and growing at a rate of 1,000 football fields an hour. It’s the latest megafire in a state still recovering from the most damaging wildfire season in history.

Wildfires across California have burned more than twice the five-year average so far this year, as of July 1. The County fire alone has burned 70,000 acres — twice the size of San Francisco and more than every other fire in the state this year combined. Over the weekend, smoke and ash from the fire drifted over the Bay Area, reminding residents of last year’s horrific blazes and partially blocking out the sun…”


https://grist.org/article/the-west-is-burning-and-its-barely-july/

Yeah, we have had bushfires in August!

I am thinking of ways to protect my place in Tassie from bush and grass fires: sprinklers, hoses, plenty green plants like comfrey, pigface daisies, lemon balm etc. Lots of green, fruit trees, berry and current bushes, herbs, flowers, veges.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 28 Jun 2018, 09:09

Heat in Western USA to spread to the east.

Wet bulb temperatures in not that many years in parts of the tropics and the SE of the US will be high enough to kill a healthy adult just sitting in the shade. With the high Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico temperatures high wet bulb temperatures will make life uncomfortable—you can’t cool by sweating!

https://robertscribbler.com/2018/06/27/western-heat-predicted-to-move-east/#comments

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 27 Jun 2018, 14:30

Glonbe warming, less polar freezing days and what happens? The tundra, the so–called permafrost—thaws! Building shift and crack, towns become uninhabitable:

villages like Kivalina in north-west Alaska will have to move within the next 10 years, Romanovsky explains. “But estimates show cost of moving is about $200m (£150m) per village of 300 people.”

“I think by now there are 70 villages who really have to move because of thawing permafrost,” Romanovsky says. “But moving villages to another location on permafrost is very difficult to guarantee for 30 years or so and the federal government doesn’t want to pay for something they have to pay for again.”


http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20171016-the-great-thaw-of-americas-north-is-coming

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 23 Jun 2018, 09:11

Image

https://t.co/kO5ufUWrKq

Fewer Arctic freezing degree days in winter north of 80°N lately.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 18 Jun 2018, 17:43

Ahahaha he has a little repertoire of tricks and uses them over and over.

I got him to admit CO2 caused AGW, but you ask him and he will say “No.”

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by DonDeeHippy » 18 Jun 2018, 17:39

Ok done hehe I feel like I’m cheeting at a test but it’s pretty funny.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 18 Jun 2018, 17:32

Ask him exactly where GRACE has been found deficient? It hasn’t at all AFAIK.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by johnsmith » 18 Jun 2018, 16:02

DonDeeHippy wrote:hehe I only post there to stir them up a bit....... Talking to them about AGW is like herding cats.



Image

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by DonDeeHippy » 18 Jun 2018, 15:01

HBS Guy wrote:Hmmm you posted that on the Dubyne MRB. Lees will log in and ask if you know the problems with the GRACE data.

There weren’t any, there was some disagreement on how fast Antarctica was melting.


holy shit monkman u r right.......

LEE 2.30...... 2 hours later
that would be the GRACE satellite that showed net ice loss as opposed to NASA's Jay Zwally's study that showed a net ice gain.

GRACE has also been found to be deficient elsewhere.

My god u r a mind reader too :clap :clap

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by DonDeeHippy » 18 Jun 2018, 13:44

hehe I only post there to stir them up a bit....... Talking to them about AGW is like herding cats.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 18 Jun 2018, 12:53

Hmmm you posted that on the Dubyne MRB. Lees will log in and ask if you know the problems with the GRACE data.

There weren’t any, there was some disagreement on how fast Antarctica was melting.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 18 Jun 2018, 12:34

Just tweeted a link to your post!

We now have 15 users, mostly bots. Do wonders for our Google rankings.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by DonDeeHippy » 18 Jun 2018, 12:27

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/16/full-fledged-5-alarm-climate-emergency-in-antarctica/
here a interesting article monky.
The latest report — known as the “Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-Comparison Exercise” — was published in the journal Nature on June 13. It collects input from 84 climate scientists at 44 institutions around the world. The researchers used three different ways of measuring ice loss on the world’s southernmost continent.
Three Measurements, One Result
First, according to The Atlantic, they measured the gravity field of the Antarctic ice sheet. We rarely think of ice as having a gravitational effect but it does, just like the moon. Satellites like those used in the NASA’s GRACE program can measure that gravitational field from space.
Second, researchers aimed radar and lasers at the surface of Antarctica to detect its surface altitude, which they can then combine with knowledge of ice physics and topography to compute its balance. Third, by measuring the velocity of moving glaciers (often with GPS), researchers can calculate how much snow is being added to a glacier and how much is disappearing into the sea.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Jun 2018, 08:32

A global slowdown of tropical-cyclone translation speed

James P. Kossin1*

As the Earth’s atmosphere warms, the atmospheric circulation changes. These changes vary by region and time of year, but there is evidence that anthropogenic warming causes a general weakening of summertime tropical circulation1–8. Because tropical cyclones are carried along within their ambient environmental wind, there is a plausible a priori expectation that the translation speed of tropical cyclones has slowed with warming. In addition to circulation changes, anthropogenic warming causes increases in atmospheric water-vapour capacity, which are generally expected to increase precipitation rates9. Rain rates near the centres of tropical cyclones are also expected to increase with increasing global temperatures10–12. The amount of tropical-cyclone-related rainfall that any given local area will experience is proportional to the rain rates and inversely proportional to the translation speeds of tropical cyclones. Here I show that tropical-cyclone translation speed has decreased globally by 10 per cent over the period 1949–2016, which is very likely to have compounded, and possibly dominated, any increases in local rainfall totals that may have occurred as a result of increased tropical-cyclone rain rates. The magnitude of the slowdown varies substantially by region and by latitude, but is generally consistent with expected changes in atmospheric circulation forced by anthropogenic emissions. Of particular importance is the slowdown of 30 per cent and 20 per cent over land areas affected by western North Pacific and North Atlantic tropical cyclones, respectively, and the slowdown of 19 per cent over land areas in the Australian region. The unprecedented rainfall totals associated with the ‘stall’ of Hurricane Harvey13–15 over Texas in 2017 provide a notable example of the relationship between regional rainfall amounts and tropical-cyclone translation speed. Any systematic past or future change in the translation speed of tropical cyclones, particularly over land, is therefore highly relevant when considering potential changes in local rainfall totals.


https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0158-3.epdf?referrer_access_token=Mq8hTJ5F47qKrAwv9yGdNNRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0MemqNFYaQFhK1eblrz65R9wqFwJ5SEHzsxU9YMRaRIdY_gW5Vxn7OLw0iDnll3UMgjKJhhc5FjxnSlIpM2Hop0SmUfuFtd3RtpX09_ytZBPN7vSE69oQeGd_NYeWGqvaQXoLFqHwhUkpyA9VmOcrvKS4QJIu39FtWLhFEK7ls_4Q%3D%3D&tracking_referrer=news.nationalgeographic.com

Re the “anthropogenic warming causes increases in atmospheric water-vapour capacity” the warmer air now can hold close to 8% more moisture than early 1900s air could. Not surprising that precipitation has increased. As seas and air warm then we have warmer, moister air. Over land, which of course also warms, thermals will be bigger. So thunderstorms will have stronger thermals, updrafts. That sends the moist, warm air high up in the atmosphere where air pressure is less and temperatures colder. Adiabatic cooling, the cooling you get on expansion of a gas cools the moist air further and the moisture condenses and freezes. A tiny nuclei of ice can have more water freeze on to it—nucleation. The budding hailstone gets heavier and starts to fall. As it falls it can freeze more ice around it, even freeze other hailstones to itself. Once it drops below the cloud level of the thunderstorm the hail stones are fixed in size.

It may be counter-intuitive but AGW will mean more and more precipitation is as hail.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Jun 2018, 08:06

Hurricanes are not the only storms.

In Australia they are called Tropical Cyclones, in the Far East they are called Typhoons. They are the same thing.

TCs are getting stronger and they are moving slower, increasing the devastation on land.

http://www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2018/05/does-global-warming-make-tropical-cyclones-stronger/

RobertScribbler writes about this:
https://robertscribbler.com/2018/06/13/stronger-slower-hurricanes-spell-big-trouble-in-a-warming-world/

It seems aerosols (sulphites) might be masking AGW and the intensity of storms: as the population in China insists on cleaner air those aerosols will be controlled for like they were in America and Europe earlier.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 15 Jun 2018, 00:12

Heave a look at the next thread—beautiful shots of Planet Earth.

Re: Consequences of AGW

Post by HBS Guy » 15 Jun 2018, 00:09

Yeah, 200 Gton a year now, compared to 280 Gton from Greenland.

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