Renewable energy developments

Post a reply


This question is a means of preventing automated form submissions by spambots.
Smilies
:rain :yak yak :zzzz :roll :bgrin :bike :purple :yellow :jump :beer :OMG :huh :WTF :Hi :mad :buddy :tweed :? :emb :wub :oops :stop :gsp :stay :rofl :sad :grn :thumb :yahoo :S :hush :B :h :gup :c :giggle :clap :rose :smitten :hot :hlo :meet :nah :read :scare :smack :b :PC :slap
View more smilies
BBCode is ON
[img] is ON
[flash] is OFF
[url] is ON
Smilies are ON
Topic review
   

Expand view Topic review: Renewable energy developments

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 23 Nov 2018, 16:39

And free petrol!

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by Sprintcyclist » 23 Nov 2018, 09:44

HBS Guy wrote:Labor’s plan for energy—must admit I have not read it or seen it, really. Some reactions:

David Crowe describes Shorten’s energy plan as the art of the possible.
https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/shorten-s-energy-plan-is-the-art-of-the-possible-20181122-p50hnz.html

The energy plan has divided experts.
https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/without-balance-and-sensible-labor-s-massive-energy-plan-divides-critics-20181122-p50hr3.html



The Government should just give us free power.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 23 Nov 2018, 09:21

Labor’s plan for energy—must admit I have not read it or seen it, really. Some reactions:

David Crowe describes Shorten’s energy plan as the art of the possible.
https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/shorten-s-energy-plan-is-the-art-of-the-possible-20181122-p50hnz.html

The energy plan has divided experts.
https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/without-balance-and-sensible-labor-s-massive-energy-plan-divides-critics-20181122-p50hr3.html

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by Sprintcyclist » 09 Nov 2018, 00:06

Bowerbird wrote:I enjotpyed the conversation, well the last page at least

I agree with those touting for more energy storage in the grid as it amakes no sense not to have backup. Microgrids are the wave of the future and particularly when you realise the vast infrastructure we have put in place linking so many rural towns to the main grids. If we can develop reliable microgrids to support those towns it would save money ultimately. To that end I do,wonder why we have not put more research into Vanadium redox batteries. The tech is Australian. They seem pretty robust and if weight and room is not an issue they should work well
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanadium_redox_battery



Yes, it has been done before successfully in Aust.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by Sprintcyclist » 08 Nov 2018, 23:54

johnsmith wrote:this is a great move. Lancaster, a city of 170 000 totally running on solar

US city empowers Australian councils to develop solar as lack of federal climate policy causes concern

A city in southern California has become the first city in the world to be zero net energy with solar farms powering the entire city, and now it is inspiring Australian cities to follow its lead.

Being zero net energy means the city produces more solar electricity through solar farms than it can use.

Lancaster Mayor Rex Parris has attributed an increase in employment, new manufacturers moving to the city, and a reduction in crime to the approach to alternative energy.

This week, Mr Parris has been in Kiama on the NSW south coast at the Cities Power Partnership summit, speaking to local council representatives from around Australia about how they might be able to do something similar.

He said he had decided to take the lead on alternative energy for the safety and wellbeing of his constituents, and this continued to drive him forward.

"Climate disruption poses the greatest threat to the public, and the primary function of government is to protect the people," Mr Parris said.

"It's the greatest threat the world has ever seen."

Communities inspired to invest in alternative energy

Local councils have been inspired by Lancaster and its alternative energy approaches, with many council representatives saying the Federal Government's lack of climate change policy makes it even more imperative that they take the lead.

One council that has been particularly inspired is the Lismore council, which has established a community solar program.

Using investments from residents, the council has installed a number of community solar farms, including a floating solar farm and one on the roof of its leisure centre.

The council also has a 100 per cent renewable energy target by 2023 for all electricity generated and used by the council.

Lismore Deputy Mayor Elly Bird was at the climate summit in Kiama and said the Northern Rivers was leading the way when it came to renewable energy in Australia.

"Unfortunately at a federal level climate policy is a complete shambles," Cr Bird said.

"In the absence of any significant action at the federal level, Local Government can really play a leadership role in this space.

"We can work with our communities to provide renewable energy infrastructure we know they want."

Local governments have crucial role to play

Macquarie University academic and climate change researcher Lesley Hughes, a keynote speaker at the summit, agrees with council representatives that they must step up and fill the vacuum left by the Federal Government.

Professor Hughes said councils were the ones who bore the brunt of a changing climate.

"Whether it's building roads or telling people where they can put their houses, Local Government is where the adaption rubber really hits the road in terms of climate change," she said.

Professor Hughes said alternative energy community projects were crucial in generating interest among citizens about the impacts of climate change and what they could do to help the planet.

"What we are facing is a planetary catastrophe," she said. "People need to act now."


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-21/californian-city-powered-by-solar-inspires-aussie-councils/10401642



a few more Aussie cities should do the same.


yes, that is great news and we should be doing likewise

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 08 Nov 2018, 22:30

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by fisherman » 06 Nov 2018, 23:51

Why is it beyond you? They want people to be dependant on a Corporation, not independent. They want all people on a joined grid so they can easily shut you off if needed (if you do not behave like a very good boy). They also want to keep the flow of money and dependancy toward those Energetic Corps.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by johnsmith » 30 Oct 2018, 15:01

Billionaire industrialist Sanjeev Gupta throws down clean energy financing challenge to Government

Sanjeev Gupta, the British billionaire who rescued the Whyalla steelworks from administration, has called on the Federal Government to do more to make it easier for big companies to access finance to make grand investments in renewable energy.

Mr Gupta said he wanted a "fast track, easy package" that would help businesses fund rooftop solar.

The long-running uncertainty around national energy policy means many major firms have avoided long-term renewable projects like large-scale rooftop solar installations.

But the cost of generating solar energy has come down considerably in recent months.
Industrial market for rooftop solar expected to expand three-fold

For some companies, it is now cheaper to use solar power than electricity sourced from a coal-fired power station and several corporates — including Coca-Cola Amatil, Stockland and Woolworths — are pushing ahead with installing thousands of panels.

Paul Peters, the CEO of energy services company Verdia, said those companies were finding it too risky to do nothing amid rising power costs.

"The cost of doing nothing is more expensive," he said.

"If I do nothing, I'd rather actually invest and get some cost savings immediately to my bottom line."

Verdia is managing a rollout of 10,000 solar panels across the bottling operations of Coca-Cola Amatil.

"Corporates are saying, 'We can actually solve some of this, and are solving it with projects that we will do ourselves'," Mr Peters told RN Breakfast.

The industrial market for rooftop solar is expected to expand three-fold by next year as more businesses turn the roofs of their warehouses into solar power plants.
Gupta calls for better financing support, not subsidies

But many in the sector said businesses could only go so far in the adoption of renewables without a broader policy framework from the Federal Government.

Mr Gupta wants the Government to boost the fire power of the Clean Energy Finance Corporation, which is tasked with providing financial support for companies to go green.

He has been relying on his own capital from GFG Alliance, which has already been central to the industrial transformation underway around Port Augusta and Whyalla in South Australia.

The work includes 13 clean energy projects, some of which include solar storage.

But he said a lack of cheap, long-term capital was holding him back.

"One of the big constraints in really applying industry at a massive scale is access to capital — and access to long-term capital, and access to cheap capital," Mr Gupta said.

"Those attributes do not exist in the private market — especially in Australia."

Mr Gupta said the Government should re-evaluate how industries and consumers could be assisted to develop green energy — not with subsidies, but with better financing support.



https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-30/sanjeev-gupta-throws-clean-energy-challenge-to-government/10445518


Why this government is still determined to try and stop the move to renewables is beyond me. They need to get on board and embrace renewables.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by dissilymodentroge » 23 Oct 2018, 15:39

Don’t know if a link has appeard to this here already. Just in case it hasn’t :- https://reneweconomy.com.au/snowy-says- ... 3-40241125

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by johnsmith » 23 Oct 2018, 10:54

dissilymordentroge wrote:Don’t know which donors you mean as surveys of big and medium businesses in Australia tell us they're very concerened about the implications of global warming and the uncertainty a lack of any clear policy direction which makes planning investment a nightmare. Maybe though you’re thinking of a certain Indian coal mining company or that beloved Australian, Gina Rinehart who happens to be a good friend of Tony Abbott?


Coal miners. Gina is at the top of that list, as is Adani. Rio tino, BHP, Wesfarmers, Xrata and a myriad of others in the mining industry. See the links to donors in the article below although some are hard to follow because business names don't necessarily reflect the names of he owners of those businesses.

Of note also is that 'advertisements spruiking the benefits of coal and mining were the biggest political expenditure by third-party groups in Australia last year, dwarfing public contributions from unions and GetUp.'

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/feb/01/coal-lobby-ads-biggest-third-party-political-expenditure-in-australia

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by dissilymordentroge » 23 Oct 2018, 10:33

johnsmith wrote:
dissilymordentroge wrote:Nobody can explain to me why the LIberals have turned against science.


The science goes against the wishes of their political donors. If you're a lib, money trumps everything else.

Don’t know which donors you mean as surveys of big and medium businesses in Australia tell us they're very concerened about the implications of global warming and the uncertainty a lack of any clear policy direction which makes planning investment a nightmare. Maybe though you’re thinking of a certain Indian coal mining company or that beloved Australian, Gina Rinehart who happens to be a good friend of Tony Abbott?

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by johnsmith » 23 Oct 2018, 10:23

dissilymordentroge wrote:Nobody can explain to me why the LIberals have turned against science.


The science goes against the wishes of their political donors. If you're a lib, money trumps everything else.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by dissilymordentroge » 23 Oct 2018, 10:19

HBS Guy wrote:Wow, they would have a lot of advantages! To add capacity just add another tank of electrolyte! One electrode instead of two!

This would be perfect for CSIRO to bring it to a commercial standard and licence it, if the Libs hadn’t cut CSIRO funding and appointed as CEO a dickhead who knows no science.

Nobody can explain to me why the LIberals have turned against science. Surely the party of big business should have a vested interest in maintaining technological advances in Australia and supporting science education to the hilt. I don’t get it.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 23 Oct 2018, 09:38

Wow, they would have a lot of advantages! To add capacity just add another tank of electrolyte! One electrode instead of two!

This would be perfect for CSIRO to bring it to a commercial standard and licence it, if the Libs hadn’t cut CSIRO funding and appointed as CEO a dickhead who knows no science.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by Bowerbird » 22 Oct 2018, 23:08

I enjotpyed the conversation, well the last page at least

I agree with those touting for more energy storage in the grid as it amakes no sense not to have backup. Microgrids are the wave of the future and particularly when you realise the vast infrastructure we have put in place linking so many rural towns to the main grids. If we can develop reliable microgrids to support those towns it would save money ultimately. To that end I do,wonder why we have not put more research into Vanadium redox batteries. The tech is Australian. They seem pretty robust and if weight and room is not an issue they should work well
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanadium_redox_battery

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by johnsmith » 21 Oct 2018, 17:49

this is a great move. Lancaster, a city of 170 000 totally running on solar

US city empowers Australian councils to develop solar as lack of federal climate policy causes concern

A city in southern California has become the first city in the world to be zero net energy with solar farms powering the entire city, and now it is inspiring Australian cities to follow its lead.

Being zero net energy means the city produces more solar electricity through solar farms than it can use.

Lancaster Mayor Rex Parris has attributed an increase in employment, new manufacturers moving to the city, and a reduction in crime to the approach to alternative energy.

This week, Mr Parris has been in Kiama on the NSW south coast at the Cities Power Partnership summit, speaking to local council representatives from around Australia about how they might be able to do something similar.

He said he had decided to take the lead on alternative energy for the safety and wellbeing of his constituents, and this continued to drive him forward.

"Climate disruption poses the greatest threat to the public, and the primary function of government is to protect the people," Mr Parris said.

"It's the greatest threat the world has ever seen."

Communities inspired to invest in alternative energy

Local councils have been inspired by Lancaster and its alternative energy approaches, with many council representatives saying the Federal Government's lack of climate change policy makes it even more imperative that they take the lead.

One council that has been particularly inspired is the Lismore council, which has established a community solar program.

Using investments from residents, the council has installed a number of community solar farms, including a floating solar farm and one on the roof of its leisure centre.

The council also has a 100 per cent renewable energy target by 2023 for all electricity generated and used by the council.

Lismore Deputy Mayor Elly Bird was at the climate summit in Kiama and said the Northern Rivers was leading the way when it came to renewable energy in Australia.

"Unfortunately at a federal level climate policy is a complete shambles," Cr Bird said.

"In the absence of any significant action at the federal level, Local Government can really play a leadership role in this space.

"We can work with our communities to provide renewable energy infrastructure we know they want."

Local governments have crucial role to play

Macquarie University academic and climate change researcher Lesley Hughes, a keynote speaker at the summit, agrees with council representatives that they must step up and fill the vacuum left by the Federal Government.

Professor Hughes said councils were the ones who bore the brunt of a changing climate.

"Whether it's building roads or telling people where they can put their houses, Local Government is where the adaption rubber really hits the road in terms of climate change," she said.

Professor Hughes said alternative energy community projects were crucial in generating interest among citizens about the impacts of climate change and what they could do to help the planet.

"What we are facing is a planetary catastrophe," she said. "People need to act now."


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-21/californian-city-powered-by-solar-inspires-aussie-councils/10401642



a few more Aussie cities should do the same.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by fisherman » 19 Oct 2018, 14:11

HBS Guy wrote:A “sun tax?”

Guess Spanish govt needs to get taxes wherever it can! EZ not been kind to Spain.


https://www.renewableenergyworld.com/ar ... ar-pv.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power_in_Spain

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 19 Oct 2018, 08:50

A “sun tax?”

Guess Spanish govt needs to get taxes wherever it can! EZ not been kind to Spain.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by fisherman » 19 Oct 2018, 07:04

Renewable energy is the future. Too bad there still is morons like the Spanish government that impose a "sun tax" on people. I think the Spanish sun tax was around 7% last time I checked. Freaks.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 12 Oct 2018, 08:24

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Aug 2018, 12:08

Plug Me In @WiebeWkkr Follow Follow @WiebeWkkr More

Arrived in Perth today! I'm very proud to show that it is also possible to reach the world's most isolated city in an electric car.
And that you can drive from the Netherlands to the other side of the world without visiting a fuel station but that's old news isn't it?

Image

Image

#PlugMeIn

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 11 Aug 2018, 12:29

Australia Post is going electric. Investing in electric bikes (it already has 1000) and now electric trikes and will look into electric vans. APO is also looking to generate its own clean energy.

The German Post Office already has a large fleet of electric vans and bikes. Still, good for APO. A Carbon Price, like we used to have, would spur moves like this in households and businesses. Still, the way the incompetent and corrupt Libs have let the energy prices go up and up is doing a similar thing, I suppose, just not as neatly.

From ReNew magazine, Jul–Sep 2018 issue.

(Will buy these magazines for a while since I want max power self sufficiency. In Tassie that will take solar and wind. If I can’t be fully self sufficient I will arrange things so washing machines and dishwashers run in the middle of the day in summer, then the hot water service then any spare power can flow into a battery. In winter things might have to be done differently—with automation the system can work out when peak power inflow happens.)

This isn’t quite the right place for it but home automation is very nearly here. There is Apple’s Siri and Google’s Home Assistant and there are robot vacuum cleaners (I believe these aren’t all that good at this stage?) and you can use a timer to turn lights on and off and, with bluetooth verbally instruct lights to be turned on and doors locked/unlocked.

We also have solar panels on the roof and domestic–sized wind generators and need to try and optimise use of the renewable energy we generate, e.g. run washing machines and dishwashers in the middle of the day when solar cells are generating at peak intensity.


All of this leads me to think that home automation is about to really take off! A home computer will become a computer that runs a home, not one you use at home. Imagine a door that will turn away Jehovah’s Witnesses for you! A fridge that tells you you are about to run out of milk and eggs and will order them in for you. The Internet of Things inside a home! Never need another key—facial recognition will unlock your front door!

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 08 Aug 2018, 09:26

Yeah, a shame.

Hope they don’t concentrate on cars tho—EVs are up and running.

There is a hydrogen–enriched diesel engine to boost fuel efficiency of semis etc. Plenty other uses.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by johnsmith » 08 Aug 2018, 09:12

Hydrogen fuel breakthrough in Queensland could fire up massive new export market

Two cars powered by hydrogen derived from ammonia will be tested in Brisbane today thanks to a Queensland breakthrough that CSIRO researchers say could turn Australia into a renewable energy superpower.

CSIRO principal research scientist Michael Dolan said it was a very exciting day for a project that has been a decade in the making.

"We started out with what we thought was a good idea, it is exciting to see it on the cusp of commercial deployment," he said.

For the past decade, researchers have worked on producing ultra-high purity hydrogen using a unique membrane technology.

The membrane breakthrough will allow hydrogen to be safely transported and used as a mass production energy source.

"We are certainly the first to demonstrate the production of very clean hydrogen from ammonia," Dr Dolan said.

"Today is the very first time in the world that hydrogen cars have been fuelled with a fuel derived from ammonia — carbon-free fuel."

Program leader David Harris said Australia has a huge source of renewable energy — sunlight and wind — that can be utilised to produce hydrogen.

But the highly flammable element is difficult to ship long distances because of its low density.

CSIRO researchers found a way to turn Australian-made hydrogen into ammonia, meaning it could be shipped safely to the mass market of Asia.

It is converted back into hydrogen using their membrane, then pumped into hydrogen-powered cars.

As of now, there are only five such cars in Australia, but there are tens of thousands across Japan, South Korea and Singapore.

"The key here is we can transport the hydrogen from the place where it is produced from renewable energy — let's say maybe that is in outback WA — and we can ship that form of ammonia anywhere in the world," Dr Harris said.

'A massive step for Australia'
Both Toyota and Hyundai have invested millions of dollars into hydrogen-powered cars.

Today's road test will be on Hyundai's flagship eco car the Nexo SUV, and Toyota's Murai.

The ABC got a sneak peek at the testing station where the cars were fuelled up and given a short test at CSIRO's Pullenvale technology hub in western Brisbane.

Hyundai spokesman Scott Nargar said the main advantage of hydrogen over electric cars was they could be filled up in three minutes like a normal car and had a range of up to 800 kilometres.

"So they are just like driving a normal car but there will be zero emissions," he said.

"From a car manufacturer's point of view, we see this as a massive step for Australia.

"Working in and out of South Korea quite regularly, I know Hyundai has a massive contract to provide hydrogen buses to the Korean Government.

"It just announced 16,000 hydrogen-powered cars will go on the road and 310 hydrogen refilling stations across the country under a five-year plan.

"They need to power those cars from somewhere so why can't it be renewable hydrogen from Australia?"

Toyota spokesman Matthew Macleod said the breakthrough was exciting because it addressed one of the key challenges with hydrogen.

"It is a game-changer," he said.

"Ammonia already has established routes for transportation and to transport at relatively normal temperatures.

"When it gets to where it is going they can actually pull the hydrogen out using the CSIRO technology, which opens up fuel cell technology to markets that previously did not have the technology.

"From an energy perspective, the ability to move solar energy or wind energy from one place to another using ammonia opens up doors that previously would have been closed because of the difficulties of transporting hydrogen."

Australia's next export boom
The CSIRO team has already received expressions of interest from Japan, South Korea and Europe, with industry players looking at taking up supplies initially to fuel commercial vehicles like buses, taxis, trucks and trains.

Dr Dolan said a million hydrogen-powered cars were expected to hit the streets by 2025.

Currently hydrogen-fuelled cars sell for about $80,000, but, as with electric cars run on power-grid charged batteries, the price is expected to fall as production increases.

Mr Nargar said they expected to see price parity with petrol and diesel cars within a decade.

Dr Dolan said the cost for the fuel would be around $15 a kilogram, with an average car holding five kilos of pure hydrogen in a tank.

"But the efficiency of the car is twice as good as current gasoline cars, so you can actually drive twice as far on a tank," he said.

Dr Dolan said renewable hydrogen was seen as Australia's next export boom.

"It could potentially rival our LNG export industry," he said.

"As of this year Australia is the world's biggest natural gas exporter. Hydrogen could be in the same position in the next couple of decades."

Hydrogen-powered cars could be on sale in Australia with the next two years.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-08/hydrogen-fuel-breakthrough-csiro-game-changer-export-potential/10082514


Only the fuckwit libs keep cutting CSIRO funding. CSIRO hits well above it's weight. Funding should be doubled for it.

Re: Renewable energy developments

Post by HBS Guy » 26 Jul 2018, 07:17

https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/fossil-fuel-industries-climate-lobbying_us_5b4f8fdee4b0de86f4894831
Fossil Fuel Industries Outspend Clean Energy Advocates On Climate Lobbying By 10 To 1
That’s one reason why climate bills fail even though most Americans think global warming is happening.


Whatever underpinnings remained for our democracy, Citizens v United reduced them to dust. In today’s news, there has been a move to allow PACs to hide their donors.


https://robertscribbler.com/2018/07/13/aiming-for-1-5-c-part-ii-this-is-your-home/#comment-148090
And the post below that.

Top