Electric Vehicals this week

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Expand view Topic review: Electric Vehicals this week

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 27 Jun 2019, 17:50

Dax wrote:https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/destination-charging

"Charge Upon Arrival

Charge for a few hours or overnight when you arrive at Destination Charging locations - at hotels, restaurants, and shopping centres across the country."

Note the web site, read again what I posted about my first long trip in the Kona. They are nit exclusive to tesla to use because of the economics. What you're talking about is tesla recharge stations where a number of cars can plug in at a time and gets really fast charge. Bet even those will have to offer charging facilities to other brands, or go broke. their are so many new EV's coming on the market during the next couple of years, tesla will become just another car maker struggling to survive like everyone else.

https://www.drive.com.au/news/lightyear ... ign=tile-4

"Like the solar race cars, the Lightyear One is designed for a maximum efficiency. To that end, the One features an electric motor at each wheel to minimise energy loss.

The body also has a long tail and partially covered rear wheels, presumably to reduce aerodynamic drag. The company has yet to provide power, torque and performance figures for the One.

The One is said to have a driving range of 725 kilometres under the WLTP test cycle. The car has five square metres of solar panels built into the roof and bonnet, all of which is protected by safety glass that can withstand the weight of a human."

https://www.drive.com.au/news/gm-might- ... source=smh


"The dormant Hummer brand could be resuscitated as part of a General Motors push into the electric vehicle sector.

Sources have told Bloomberg GM is considering reviving the Hummer marque for use on all-electric off-road vehicles.

The automaker is currently working on two major electric vehicle projects: BEV3 will deliver a platform for small and mid-size cars and crossovers, while the other is working on an architecture for pickup trucks, large vehicles and off-roaders. We presume any Hummer revival will use this latter platform."

That is the Tesla Supercharger Network.....

https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/supercharger

Tesla are so far ahead of anyone else, if Tesla make their network available to other brands it wont have to be for years.... After all no car made yet has more range than the 7 year old original Tesla S, now they have even more range.....
As it is now it's a enticement, you want reliable Fast charging buy a Tesla, anything else just doesn't have the network or Tech....Why would they let other companies use thair Network if it gives them more sales......

I saw the Solar car as well, I think up to 15km's a hour recharge ,very interesting....

:purple

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Dax » 27 Jun 2019, 17:35

https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/destination-charging

"Charge Upon Arrival

Charge for a few hours or overnight when you arrive at Destination Charging locations - at hotels, restaurants, and shopping centres across the country."

Note the web site, read again what I posted about my first long trip in the Kona. They are nit exclusive to tesla to use because of the economics. What you're talking about is tesla recharge stations where a number of cars can plug in at a time and gets really fast charge. Bet even those will have to offer charging facilities to other brands, or go broke. their are so many new EV's coming on the market during the next couple of years, tesla will become just another car maker struggling to survive like everyone else.

https://www.drive.com.au/news/lightyear ... ign=tile-4

"Like the solar race cars, the Lightyear One is designed for a maximum efficiency. To that end, the One features an electric motor at each wheel to minimise energy loss.

The body also has a long tail and partially covered rear wheels, presumably to reduce aerodynamic drag. The company has yet to provide power, torque and performance figures for the One.

The One is said to have a driving range of 725 kilometres under the WLTP test cycle. The car has five square metres of solar panels built into the roof and bonnet, all of which is protected by safety glass that can withstand the weight of a human."

https://www.drive.com.au/news/gm-might- ... source=smh


"The dormant Hummer brand could be resuscitated as part of a General Motors push into the electric vehicle sector.

Sources have told Bloomberg GM is considering reviving the Hummer marque for use on all-electric off-road vehicles.

The automaker is currently working on two major electric vehicle projects: BEV3 will deliver a platform for small and mid-size cars and crossovers, while the other is working on an architecture for pickup trucks, large vehicles and off-roaders. We presume any Hummer revival will use this latter platform."

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 27 Jun 2019, 17:06

I don't know why your even worried about the Supercharger network there are none in Tasmania....
https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/supercharger

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 27 Jun 2019, 17:03

Dax wrote:
Bongalong wrote:
DonDeeHippy wrote:I know I know 2 Tesla posts in one day, but this is huge.... The New V3 supercharger of Tesla has been tested by a owner of a Model3 and it's really impressive. There are a few other Fast chargers in Europe and the results are shown in the article..

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/06/24/te ... es-charts/

We have new data about the performance of Tesla’s new Supercharger version 3 (V3) when charging a Tesla Model 3 Long Range. It’s even faster than we thought! YouTuber Dagery recorded a charging session, showing the Tesla recovering 50% of the battery capacity in under 12 minutes.

The vehicle was plugged in at a low 2% state of charge, quickly shot up to the full 250 kW power, and added 50% of capacity in 11 minutes and 29 seconds from the start of the charge session! Dragery went on to charge to 90% before closing out the session, giving us a wealth of new data on the Supercharger V3 charging curve.
A more typical charge session, plugging in at 10%, is almost as fast, adding 50% of range in about 12 and a half minutes.
To me, it looks like the Model 3 paired with Supercharger V3 is crushing it. Able to cover almost 740 km with just a 20 minute break, the vehicle is usually going be waiting for its owners on road trips, and not the other way around.

This is another reason to buy a Tesla, their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla (Tesla Supercharge network in AUS is the only fast charger service in Australia) :purple

Nice .. but I thought this claim: "their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla" had been successfully challenged on this forum before!??!,.. though I can't remember the outcome of the debacle of course otherwise, um,.. I would know the outcome of said debacle.... :Hi :beer :beer :beer :beer :beer


To see the truth all you have to do is check the tesla charger site for Aus, then ring a couple of those places and you will find they will charge any EV they have an adapter for and from what I'm told, with every EV released here, they get an adapter to charge them. The reason is, there are only a few tesla's in Aus and to recover their investment, Telsa has encouraged them to use adapters to charge any EV. Musk himself has stated that anyone can use their charge points, because it creates revenue and a quicker way of paying for their investments.

To believe only tesla EV's will be charged is economic insanity, it may be years before a tesla comes their way in many places and I've used 9 of them now, with no problems. I'm in Aus, between home and Canberra via the coast, have used tesla charge stations all the way with no problems.

Posted the link to the tesla charge site here earlier, no where does it say only tesla cars can be charged.

look at the post just before this one,,, there is Destination chargers (ones that are compatible with Tesla) and the supercharger network.... the Supercharger network is only accessible by Tesla cars.....

However, for the moment, the network can only be used by Tesla vehicles. ... According to Tesla CEO Elon Musk, this is because no other vehicle manufacturer agreed to sign up to Tesla's Supercharger network when the company offered

so that's what Musk actually said about the Supercharger network.....
While Tesla uses a different plug than any other car, the protocol for AC charging is the same, and a simple adapter is possible (just as Tesla provides and adapter for their car to use other Level 2 AC chargers). For the Tesla Supercharger network, there is no adapter that can allow it use by non-Tesla cars.


https://thedriven.io/2019/04/03/can-non ... -chargers/
Correction: This article has been updated to reflect a statement from Tesla yesterday that at Destination Charging locations, it does not set one charger to non-Teslas and one to Tesla only. Additionally, even with CCS plugs, Tesla Supercharger sites will not be able to charge other EVs.


Even the original Roadster Tesla made can't use the Supercharger network, only 3 cars can use it, the S , X and 3.....

Again you are confusing destination chargers and apparently even home chargers that Tesla make for private owners that can charge other EV's with the right adaptor, hell Tesla even supply them with the adaptors.
Teslsa Owned Supercharger network is only available to Tesla's....

https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/supercharger

https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/destination-charging

:purple

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Dax » 27 Jun 2019, 09:29

Bongalong wrote:
DonDeeHippy wrote:I know I know 2 Tesla posts in one day, but this is huge.... The New V3 supercharger of Tesla has been tested by a owner of a Model3 and it's really impressive. There are a few other Fast chargers in Europe and the results are shown in the article..

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/06/24/te ... es-charts/

We have new data about the performance of Tesla’s new Supercharger version 3 (V3) when charging a Tesla Model 3 Long Range. It’s even faster than we thought! YouTuber Dagery recorded a charging session, showing the Tesla recovering 50% of the battery capacity in under 12 minutes.

The vehicle was plugged in at a low 2% state of charge, quickly shot up to the full 250 kW power, and added 50% of capacity in 11 minutes and 29 seconds from the start of the charge session! Dragery went on to charge to 90% before closing out the session, giving us a wealth of new data on the Supercharger V3 charging curve.
A more typical charge session, plugging in at 10%, is almost as fast, adding 50% of range in about 12 and a half minutes.
To me, it looks like the Model 3 paired with Supercharger V3 is crushing it. Able to cover almost 740 km with just a 20 minute break, the vehicle is usually going be waiting for its owners on road trips, and not the other way around.

This is another reason to buy a Tesla, their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla (Tesla Supercharge network in AUS is the only fast charger service in Australia) :purple

Nice .. but I thought this claim: "their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla" had been successfully challenged on this forum before!??!,.. though I can't remember the outcome of the debacle of course otherwise, um,.. I would know the outcome of said debacle.... :Hi :beer :beer :beer :beer :beer


To see the truth all you have to do is check the tesla charger site for Aus, then ring a couple of those places and you will find they will charge any EV they have an adapter for and from what I'm told, with every EV released here, they get an adapter to charge them. The reason is, there are only a few tesla's in Aus and to recover their investment, Telsa has encouraged them to use adapters to charge any EV. Musk himself has stated that anyone can use their charge points, because it creates revenue and a quicker way of paying for their investments.

To believe only tesla EV's will be charged is economic insanity, it may be years before a tesla comes their way in many places and I've used 9 of them now, with no problems. I'm in Aus, between home and Canberra via the coast, have used tesla charge stations all the way with no problems.

Posted the link to the tesla charge site here earlier, no where does it say only tesla cars can be charged.

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 27 Jun 2019, 06:36

Bongalong wrote:
DonDeeHippy wrote:I know I know 2 Tesla posts in one day, but this is huge.... The New V3 supercharger of Tesla has been tested by a owner of a Model3 and it's really impressive. There are a few other Fast chargers in Europe and the results are shown in the article..

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/06/24/te ... es-charts/

We have new data about the performance of Tesla’s new Supercharger version 3 (V3) when charging a Tesla Model 3 Long Range. It’s even faster than we thought! YouTuber Dagery recorded a charging session, showing the Tesla recovering 50% of the battery capacity in under 12 minutes.

The vehicle was plugged in at a low 2% state of charge, quickly shot up to the full 250 kW power, and added 50% of capacity in 11 minutes and 29 seconds from the start of the charge session! Dragery went on to charge to 90% before closing out the session, giving us a wealth of new data on the Supercharger V3 charging curve.
A more typical charge session, plugging in at 10%, is almost as fast, adding 50% of range in about 12 and a half minutes.
To me, it looks like the Model 3 paired with Supercharger V3 is crushing it. Able to cover almost 740 km with just a 20 minute break, the vehicle is usually going be waiting for its owners on road trips, and not the other way around.

This is another reason to buy a Tesla, their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla (Tesla Supercharge network in AUS is the only fast charger service in Australia) :purple

Nice .. but I thought this claim: "their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla" had been successfully challenged on this forum before!??!,.. though I can't remember the outcome of the debacle of course otherwise, um,.. I would know the outcome of said debacle.... :Hi :beer :beer :beer :beer :beer

If your in the market for a electric car and tesla are the only ones that can use fast chargerers it makes it more attractive.
A big one is jaguar EV, over $100,000 and no access to a fast charger so far in Austrsalia, so instead of minutes to recharge on a long trip it will be hours, so if your in the market and you need to do long trip it would make the Tesla really the only option.

Now where the confusion is, Tesla as a service to it's customers also lists any charger as a Destination charger... So a Tesla is compatible with these Stations...

Tesla did offer their Supercharger Network to other car manufacturers but so far they have declined, I don't know if it was Tesla terms of use or pride that has stopped them all from using it...

Tesla use only, Fast charging Supercharge network owned by Tesla
https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/supercharger

Tesla list of every charger in Australia that is compatable with thair cars but owned by 3rd parties
https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/destination-charging

So other fast chargers will be installed in Australia ,especially now with Jag, Hyundai and Nissan selling EV's. Unfortunately the other car manufacturers are relying on 3rd party companies to build them so it could take years before it's profitable to build them...
Tesla unlike the legacy car builders have a mission of Cleaning up the Earth...
They built the first real electric car and continue to build them better and safer (unlike the others that had to be dragged into any safety because it costs money, like seatbelts and airbags)
They are one of the biggest solar panel makers and sellers ,they just developed a solar panel that looks like a roofing tile so no more ugly solar panels on your roof.
The also do a home battery
So from Tesla you can be completely self suppling with energy use, solar panels, battery storage and a car......
And more to topic the only Electric Vehicle you can buy that can be Refuelled quickly in Australia...
Their cheapest car in Australia is around $70,000 on road ,it's the size of a Camry , it's a luxury car so it's the same price as it's competitors, BMW ,Merc and AUDI also Lexus….. Much Lower running costs, that's why it's best selling Luxury car last year in the USA and still best selling this year... :purple

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Bongalong » 26 Jun 2019, 15:07

DonDeeHippy wrote:I know I know 2 Tesla posts in one day, but this is huge.... The New V3 supercharger of Tesla has been tested by a owner of a Model3 and it's really impressive. There are a few other Fast chargers in Europe and the results are shown in the article..

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/06/24/te ... es-charts/

We have new data about the performance of Tesla’s new Supercharger version 3 (V3) when charging a Tesla Model 3 Long Range. It’s even faster than we thought! YouTuber Dagery recorded a charging session, showing the Tesla recovering 50% of the battery capacity in under 12 minutes.

The vehicle was plugged in at a low 2% state of charge, quickly shot up to the full 250 kW power, and added 50% of capacity in 11 minutes and 29 seconds from the start of the charge session! Dragery went on to charge to 90% before closing out the session, giving us a wealth of new data on the Supercharger V3 charging curve.
A more typical charge session, plugging in at 10%, is almost as fast, adding 50% of range in about 12 and a half minutes.
To me, it looks like the Model 3 paired with Supercharger V3 is crushing it. Able to cover almost 740 km with just a 20 minute break, the vehicle is usually going be waiting for its owners on road trips, and not the other way around.

This is another reason to buy a Tesla, their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla (Tesla Supercharge network in AUS is the only fast charger service in Australia) :purple

Nice .. but I thought this claim: "their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla" had been successfully challenged on this forum before!??!,.. though I can't remember the outcome of the debacle of course otherwise, um,.. I would know the outcome of said debacle.... :Hi :beer :beer :beer :beer :beer

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 26 Jun 2019, 13:38

I know I know 2 Tesla posts in one day, but this is huge.... The New V3 supercharger of Tesla has been tested by a owner of a Model3 and it's really impressive. There are a few other Fast chargers in Europe and the results are shown in the article..

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/06/24/te ... es-charts/

We have new data about the performance of Tesla’s new Supercharger version 3 (V3) when charging a Tesla Model 3 Long Range. It’s even faster than we thought! YouTuber Dagery recorded a charging session, showing the Tesla recovering 50% of the battery capacity in under 12 minutes.

The vehicle was plugged in at a low 2% state of charge, quickly shot up to the full 250 kW power, and added 50% of capacity in 11 minutes and 29 seconds from the start of the charge session! Dragery went on to charge to 90% before closing out the session, giving us a wealth of new data on the Supercharger V3 charging curve.
A more typical charge session, plugging in at 10%, is almost as fast, adding 50% of range in about 12 and a half minutes.
To me, it looks like the Model 3 paired with Supercharger V3 is crushing it. Able to cover almost 740 km with just a 20 minute break, the vehicle is usually going be waiting for its owners on road trips, and not the other way around.

This is another reason to buy a Tesla, their supercharger network is only accessed by Tesla vehicles, so most places the only way to recharge your car fast is to own a tesla (Tesla Supercharge network in AUS is the only fast charger service in Australia) :purple

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 26 Jun 2019, 06:37

https://insideevs.com/news/356489/tesla-model-3-safety/

As most Tesla fans already know, Tesla’s vehicles are just about the safest on the road. Model 3 is the safest car ever tested by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which judged Tesla’s newest car to have the lowest probability of injury in a collision of any of the over 900 cars it has tested. In second place is Model S, and in third - you guessed it - Model X.



Cameron explained in a previous video why batteries are safer than gasoline. In his latest production, he explains that the entire drivetrain of an EV is safer in the case of a collision. A Tesla has larger front and rear crumple zones than would be possible on a vehicle with a gas tank in the back and an engine in the front, and it also has a more rigid passenger compartment in between.
Of course, a picture is always worth a thousand words, and it’s worth watching Cameron’s video all the way through to see the visual examples. He presents an animation showing what would happen if a Model 3 collided with a telephone pole - an especially deadly object to hit. The bumper and sub-frame bend and wrap themselves around the pole, and the front motor drops below the battery, away from the passenger compartment. “That passenger compartment is caged in a combination of aluminum and steel in what are some of the fattest pillars and rails in the automotive world,” says Cameron.
From the earliest days of the company, Tesla has made the safety of its batteries a top priority (Elon and his colleagues knew very well that the media would trumpet the news of any battery fires). When a battery malfunctions, overheating in one cell can spread to others, a phenomenon called thermal runaway. Several features of Tesla’s battery packs are designed to prevent this. The connections between cells are designed to melt at a much lower temperature than that required to cause thermal runaway (much as the wire in a fuse melts to break a circuit). The cells are also separated by cooling vanes, and each cell has emergency vents that allow hot gases to escape before they can build up enough pressure to cause an explosion. According to Cameron, not a single Model 3 to date has been consumed by thermal runaway, even in cases of significant damage to the battery pack

How does Tesla’s controversial Autopilot suite of features affect safety? As Cameron points out, the statistics tell the tale. Thanks to Tesla’s connectivity features, the company has detailed data on all accidents that happen to its cars. Teslas on Autopilot average one accident per 2.7 million miles driven, whereas the average for all passenger vehicles in the US is one accident for every 436,000 miles.

And to think they are available in Australia , Tesla's are already the same price of other Luxury brands up front....
when you account for the life of the vehical they are about the same price as other Camry sized sedans...Lower fuel, Lower maintenance and good resale help a lot. Well thats going off American figures, no Model 3 has made it here yet, but they are on the boat....
I think of all those people that buy the big SUV's for safety with those huge cars and probably never use them offroad, with a Tesla they are even more safe and cheeper to run...

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Bongalong » 21 Jun 2019, 12:54

johnsmith wrote:was talking to a Tesla owner today (tesla S)... I asked him how he found the car

his answer "Fucken Brilliant'.

hOW MUCH DID HE PAY FOR IT?

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 21 Jun 2019, 09:08

Dax wrote:This is an interesting development and may be the reason why tesla model 3 prices are going up.

"Tesla has continued to shuffle its Model 3 range around the world, with American reports suggesting production of the rear-wheel drive Long Range variant has been abruptly halted."

https://www.drive.com.au/news/tesla-mod ... ign=tile-4

This link is even more interesting.

"YouTuber and robotics enthusiast Simone Giertz has managed to beat billionaire mogul Elon Musk to the punch in releasing Tesla's first pickup truck.

However, unlike Tesla's yet-to-be-released pickup truck, Giertz made hers by transforming a Model 3 sedan.

Designing and planning the car took more than a year before Giertz and a team of mechanics and modifiers took on the task of building the 'Truckla' - a term she coined by merging the words Tesla and truck."

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech ... truck.html

Not sure why this makes the model 3 more expensive, and it doesn’t effect Australia as the model isn’t available here...

And yes the shitty robot girl has struck again with her Ute conversion of a 3 , it looks pretty good.
A few months and the Tesla Ute will be revealed I’d say it will be more f truck size though.
I.think the big thing for me will be the specs and price for the cheep version. Utes are the only car I can really use. :purple

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Dax » 21 Jun 2019, 08:41

This is an interesting development and may be the reason why tesla model 3 prices are going up.

"Tesla has continued to shuffle its Model 3 range around the world, with American reports suggesting production of the rear-wheel drive Long Range variant has been abruptly halted."

https://www.drive.com.au/news/tesla-mod ... ign=tile-4

This link is even more interesting.

"YouTuber and robotics enthusiast Simone Giertz has managed to beat billionaire mogul Elon Musk to the punch in releasing Tesla's first pickup truck.

However, unlike Tesla's yet-to-be-released pickup truck, Giertz made hers by transforming a Model 3 sedan.

Designing and planning the car took more than a year before Giertz and a team of mechanics and modifiers took on the task of building the 'Truckla' - a term she coined by merging the words Tesla and truck."

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech ... truck.html

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 16 Jun 2019, 07:31

The interior colour isn't a problem Dax, they will only be doing a black interior for LHD models.....if you want I can find you some links on Tesla's official position on this...
Yup $66,000 for a new Tesla 3 plus on road costs :)

As they say in the link no one in their right mind is going to do real 4wd in a $200,000 vehicle, just like no one would take a porche or even a Mazda SUV to the cape, but if they need to do a bit of off road activity at least they know the car wont flip or get easily bogged... There are lots of Tesla YouTube on the snow and they do pretty well, even with normal tyres they get good grip, a lot better than other CARS.

As there are no real off road EV's yet ,it's really a mute point though...how well a Tesla does on dirt, no EV is good on the dirt with the idea of outback OZ.

If you think about it, of all the EV's available to customers right now, the Tesla X would be the best off road vehicle (just no really good off road vehicles available)...

In the few months Tesla will be announcing their Ute... So Rivian or Tesla will be the choice for the next few year's... The other car companies are giving vague threats of EV utes but nothing concrete yet, then expect a 3-5 year wait before they will be released... :purple

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Dax » 16 Jun 2019, 07:00

DonDeeHippy wrote:https://insideevs.com/news/354477/tesla-model-x-off-road-mud/
Tesla Model X is completely unprepared to go off-road but it survived and did pretty well.
Tesla Model X 90D with stock tires, high suspension setting and slip start mode was recently tested off-road in the mud, steep hills, and sharp undulations by Out of Spec Motoring.
We must admit it looks scary sometimes and it's hard to recommend risking such ae xpensive car to pass the obstacles. However, the Model X survived without damage it seems. The electric all-wheel drive and traction control cope pretty well

It seem the rumours of Tesla's not being good on the dirt where exaggerated..... :purple


Hilarious, they did that video on a bit of a muddy track right beside a highway and at about 10kph, they travelled over the same holes over and over and they were just small mud holes, nothing like what you get in Aus off road. Try taking a tesla on hundreds of klms of corrugated gravel, sand or rock roads and don't forget the bull dust pits that are abundant on the outback roads.

By the way, the price of a tesla model 3 in Aus is over $70000 plus on road costs as I have said. A lady I know has been told she will get hers at the end of August and they are yet to provide a final price because she has to select her colour interior decor from what is going to be available in Aus and that won't be known until Tesla send them list of what is coming. My osteo friend has cancelled her tesla after that and is buying a kona highlander, took her for a long drive and she just loved it. Have told her it might e better to wait for 6-12 months as there are many EVs coming into Aus during that time, but no, she wants one now and so has ordered her kona.

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 15 Jun 2019, 07:22

https://insideevs.com/news/354477/tesla ... -road-mud/
Tesla Model X is completely unprepared to go off-road but it survived and did pretty well.
Tesla Model X 90D with stock tires, high suspension setting and slip start mode was recently tested off-road in the mud, steep hills, and sharp undulations by Out of Spec Motoring.
We must admit it looks scary sometimes and it's hard to recommend risking such ae xpensive car to pass the obstacles. However, the Model X survived without damage it seems. The electric all-wheel drive and traction control cope pretty well

It seem the rumours of Tesla's not being good on the dirt where exaggerated..... :purple

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 15 Jun 2019, 06:30

Sprintcyclist wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
Sprintcyclist wrote:
Wow, so Mitsubishis are good?


I've owned a couple in the past... while not as refined as some of the other cars, the damn things just keep going. You couldn't kill them if you tried. And they offer the best warranties (or they did the last time i was in the market, but that was a few years ago)


yes, well, they have won many paris to dakkar comps.
Sure, those vehicles are different, but Mitsi know how to build them.
My wife has a lancer wagon, great fun wagon. Can really feel the rallying pedigree in it

my last ute was a Mitsubishi and did over 200k and never had a problem, as john says their warrantee's are very good as well.as 5 years then 10 years on drive train :purple

The Overlander as a plug in hybrid SUV that is sold in Aus and is a very good seller worldwide... :purple

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Sprintcyclist » 14 Jun 2019, 21:44

johnsmith wrote:
Sprintcyclist wrote:
Wow, so Mitsubishis are good?


I've owned a couple in the past... while not as refined as some of the other cars, the damn things just keep going. You couldn't kill them if you tried. And they offer the best warranties (or they did the last time i was in the market, but that was a few years ago)


yes, well, they have won many paris to dakkar comps.
Sure, those vehicles are different, but Mitsi know how to build them.
My wife has a lancer wagon, great fun wagon. Can really feel the rallying pedigree in it

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by johnsmith » 14 Jun 2019, 20:14

Sprintcyclist wrote:
Wow, so Mitsubishis are good?


I've owned a couple in the past... while not as refined as some of the other cars, the damn things just keep going. You couldn't kill them if you tried. And they offer the best warranties (or they did the last time i was in the market, but that was a few years ago)

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Sprintcyclist » 14 Jun 2019, 19:54

Dax wrote:The revolution is well underway, in the next year or so, we will have a huge number of EV's to chose from and now Toyota and Subaru have taken up the challenge together.

"Toyota and Subaru to develop joint electric car platform
Toyota and Subaru will join forces to form a platform for EVs
1 / 1 photos
Toyota and Subaru will jointly develop a new electric vehicle platform suitable for mid-sized and large passenger cars, including sedans and crossovers.

In addition to this, the two Japanese automakers will also use the new EV architecture to develop a new c-segment crossover together, with each brand selling a version of this vehicle.

According to the two companies, the new platform will use Toyota's electrification technologies and Subaru's all-wheel drive expertise. Both carmakers will shift their existing electric car development over to this new project."

https://www.drive.com.au/news/toyota-an ... rce=theage


Toyota and Subaru are a good marriage

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Sprintcyclist » 14 Jun 2019, 19:50

DonDeeHippy wrote:
Dax wrote:We will see and land cruisers aren't over priced, have 2 of them. One is a 1986 more than 30years old a series 60 turbo sahara, which a couple of years ago entered the 1 million klms range and has had a full engine and auto gearbox rebuilt, our senior chef manager and band drummer (lady) drives it.

Then there's my 1991 1hdt turbo cruiser, which has done just over 730000klms and recently had an engine rebuild. Everything else is original and only did that rebuild because an engine reconditioning friend offered to do it for cost, because we installed his solar system for cost.

I expect to change my mind a number of times before settling on an EV replacement for my cruiser, the number of varieties of Ev's will only escalate and prices will drop dramatically as more come onto the market. Sticking with one model and claiming it will be the winner is rather short sighted, If I'd taken that blindly stubborn approach to my life, would never got to where I am and would be dead a few times over.

At the moment am loving the Kona, such a cool little car to drive and overtaking is such a dream, you're past them before they realise you're even there and no need to exceed the speed limit with such incredibly rapid acceleration.

Same price of a Land cruiser you can get 2 Navara's use half the fuel ,more power, twice the comfort and the same towing and carrying capacity.
The only plus is with the V8 motors you can rip the baffles out and they sound pretty cool.

Over priced to the shithouse, we use just about every ute and the cruiser's while seemingly tough, are rough ,fuel hungry monsters and still need to spend a fortune to get their suspension up to scratch, just like the others....
We do lots of 4wd jobs and carry around 3 to3.5 tonne trailers everywhere, the toughest out of the lot with hardly any work done is a old Mitsubishi 2008 triton, just unbreakable.... :purple

Although I do wish I had a EV though and trying to juggle the old pocket book to get one, I might have to wait a few years and get a second hand one though....


Wow, so Mitsubishis are good?

And, for the money a real bargain

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by johnsmith » 14 Jun 2019, 17:49

was talking to a Tesla owner today (tesla S)... I asked him how he found the car

his answer "Fucken Brilliant'.

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Sprintcyclist » 14 Jun 2019, 09:29

DonDeeHippy wrote:I found the link its a good read
https://www.racq.com.au/TheRoadAhead/Ar ... er-highway

Mission accomplished, we looked back on a 2122km journey during which we’d recharged six times, for a total of about seven hours. The electricity hadn’t cost us a cent, thanks to the State Government’s extended free-charging period, meaning we’d saved roughly $240 in equivalent fuel costs, or $105 were we paying for the recharges.


thanks Don.

that's pretty good. 'petrol' is 1/2 price.
servicing will be a lot cheaper, lets call that 1/4 price.

Good going

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by DonDeeHippy » 14 Jun 2019, 07:34

The thing I noticed is they did 2200km's and it took 7 hours to charge….the free charging network the QLD government did isn't that fast..

the Kona would of been full charged (400km) so 7 hours for 1800km's charge...so about 260km's a hour recharge...

The new chargers being built will do about 800km's a hour and the New Tesla supercharger 3 will do 1000km....It's just being released now .
So in a few years a trip like this will take less than 2 hours of recharging and about 5 breaks , if you have a family or like me and need a break every couple of hours, a EV wouldn't add any more time to my trip than a normal car..
As it is 7 hours isn't much waiting if it's free, if they saved $240 that's a saving of $35 a hour....

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by pinkeye » 13 Jun 2019, 23:20

Bongalong wrote:
DonDeeHippy wrote:I found the link its a good read
https://www.racq.com.au/TheRoadAhead/Ar ... er-highway

Mission accomplished, we looked back on a 2122km journey during which we’d recharged six times, for a total of about seven hours. The electricity hadn’t cost us a cent, thanks to the State Government’s extended free-charging period, meaning we’d saved roughly $240 in equivalent fuel costs, or $105 were we paying for the recharges.

*** So you're saying if you paid for the recharges it would cost nearly half of what it costs for the eqivalent in petrol?

--> The business case almost doesn't make sense then to most I would assume... :yak yak :yak yak


Well my friend you know what they say about using the word 'assume'.? Yeah? :yak yak :roll :bgrin

Re: Electric Vehicals this week

Post by Bongalong » 13 Jun 2019, 13:24

DonDeeHippy wrote:I found the link its a good read
https://www.racq.com.au/TheRoadAhead/Ar ... er-highway

Mission accomplished, we looked back on a 2122km journey during which we’d recharged six times, for a total of about seven hours. The electricity hadn’t cost us a cent, thanks to the State Government’s extended free-charging period, meaning we’d saved roughly $240 in equivalent fuel costs, or $105 were we paying for the recharges.

*** So you're saying if you paid for the recharges it would cost nearly half of what it costs for the eqivalent in petrol?

--> The business case almost doesn't make sense then to most I would assume... :yak yak :yak yak

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