Well, THAT was a shock to the system

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Expand view Topic review: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Oct 2018, 15:53

Bought an organic Gardening magazine.

Holy shit, Hobart Botanic Garden is going to be a HUGE resource! They have imported seeds from the US of tomato varieties more suited to the cool Tasmanian summer. Be spending some time there I reckon, once the house is being built. Tomato sale 6000 seedlings of 100 varieties. Also suitable varieties of other veges.

Two day trip, Salamanca Markets and Botanic Gardens.

There was a really great runner bean I used to grow, best flavor, amazing flavor. Then AGW and UHI made it too hot for that bean, last time I planted it I got 5 beans :bgrin But I can grow it in Tassie!

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 01 Oct 2018, 14:45

Phew, think i will stop for a while. Been reading and writing notes of the Holistic Orchard book. Got to the introduction of orchard sprays to boost organic activity (of the trees, of the soil critters and beneficial microorganisms in bark, foliage etc.

Compost tea is more useful than water. Where is compost tea, remember writing it down, etc. Finally found it. Then how to make the blessed tea, knew I had written it somewhere, found it! Rewrote it a bit using other info I had found.

Found the spray, convert from US ingredients (they STILL fuck around with pounds and pints and shit)

15g of dried kelp is equivalent to 75ml liquid kelp extract so glad I bought dried!

Some unsulphured molasses, half a cup, to feed any useful microbeasties—Goodies & Grains at the market will have it, bit $$ but I do get a seniors discount there.

Think I will buy a 4 or 5L bottle fish hydrosylate, gonna use quite a bit of it, 100ml per 5L spraypack.

Was going to bring a heap of 20L “cubes” I used in brewing just to get them out the shed here, will come in useful carrying water, dechlorinating water etc. Fill cube with tap water, add one Camden tablet (pot. metabisulphite) next day—dechlorinated water, even the chloramine. Will et it stand another day, get rid of the bisulphite!

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 19 Sep 2018, 22:12

Great magazine on gardening with natives. Will keep that one. Couple magazines on landscaping etc. Totally unrealistic, not just cost but I can’t build walls alongside a path—the clay would break the wall in not that many years. Same with concrete paths etc. Gravel will have to be the go.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 19 Sep 2018, 19:16

Flicked through a magazine “Outdoor Rooms” i.e. spaces outside where you can entertain. Each room costing more than my whole house!

But:

1. an above ground fire pit—NEEDED!

2. An article—use a collection of industrial lights. Lights outside = mosquitoes! Any firepit needs to keep the light of the fire masked—plantings, design of firepit. Also—plant tansy. Tansy is one of the medieval strewing herbs. It repels insects. Plant a few near your front and rear doors—LOT less mozzies and flies will get in.


Really, I think I will spend most time in my conservatory except maybe a month or two of summer. But a fire is a nice thing to look at of nights.

Will DEFINITELY want a brick pizza oven. Use it as a tandoori, cook a chook or duck Tandoori style, cook Indian bread. And pizzas.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 18 Sep 2018, 19:59

One guy wanted to buy a 50L glass carboy. I said $50. The things cost me like $45, something you stock so people don’t go to another brewshop :bgrin This guy, jew or Lebanese, was in my shop for an hour pleading for a discount. I was thinking “Man, you could have earned $50 elsewhere in the time you have spent begging for a discount I cannot afford to give.”

I will ask for a discount on big items.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by johnsmith » 18 Sep 2018, 19:44

HBS Guy wrote:Hah, someone had offered $5. What a cheapskate! :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin


not necessarily, some people ALWAYS ask for a discount, my mum is one of those. No matter what the item or price

lady i know volunteered at an op shop, she says people would always ask for discounts on items ticketed at $1.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 18 Sep 2018, 19:18

Hah, someone had offered $5. What a cheapskate! :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Sep 2018, 13:47

Nine plates just walked out the house and a crisp $10 bill walked in.

Less clutter, YAY!

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by johnsmith » 13 Sep 2018, 18:03

HBS Guy wrote:Yeah, think I am a member of 2-3 of them.

But this stuff is better on GumTree. Calling it crap is flattering some items.


crap is what facebook is good for.
I've even seen people try to sell worn out work boots for $2.... i guess it was worth a try for them

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 13 Sep 2018, 18:01

Yeah, think I am a member of 2-3 of them.

But this stuff is better on GumTree. Calling it crap is flattering some items.

Hmmm one item is in really good nick and is a complete set—made by Mikasa, Japan. Good stuff! Put that on Ebay.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by johnsmith » 13 Sep 2018, 17:53

HBS Guy wrote:A table got taken away for repair and I could access the cupboards in the base. Geez, shitload of old crockery, stuff I had bought decades ago.

So putting them into sets and advertising them on GumTree.

Will keep going, have a shitload of books I can sell for more $$$ than at a garage sale hopefully. Have to get rid of a metric buttload of crap before I move to Tassie.



you should have a local facebook 'market' page. They work great, I recently sold several items on it after the move and pretty quickly too.

My local one is called 'buy,swap, sell gold coast', you'll have to dig around to see what your local one is called.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 13 Sep 2018, 16:22

A table got taken away for repair and I could access the cupboards in the base. Geez, shitload of old crockery, stuff I had bought decades ago.

So putting them into sets and advertising them on GumTree.

Will keep going, have a shitload of books I can sell for more $$$ than at a garage sale hopefully. Have to get rid of a metric buttload of crap before I move to Tassie.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 02 Aug 2018, 23:32

Hmmm was gonna plant the cherries on the northern half of rows 4&5. Changed my mind, they are taller than the dwarf perry pears and so the shade line of the house won’t bother them as much. The Kentish sour will go on the northern side of the southern half of row 4—self fertile but won’t fertilise sweet cherries. Stella will go on northern side of the southern half of row 5, the westernmost row: cherry pollen can be blown by wind so having the other cherry trees south and east of the Stella means the wind can blow the Stella cross–fertilising pollen on to them.

Will ensure plenty of bee attracting plants that have some blooming in mid–late winter to end spring—some apples won’t blossom until first half of November. Some herbs are good: plant onion and parsley, will grow, set seed and the seed heads attract all sorts of good insects. Fennel too. Succulents, nice and tough, no watering needed in summer.

Next year for understory plants: Tas, pepperleaf and pepperberry (a male and a couple female plants,) red and black currants, gooseberries, native Tassie berries and more herbs, tansy, sage and oregano.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 01 Aug 2018, 20:50

Was at Westfield Marion on the weekend, got a couple books cheap:

“Be your own builder” not that I will be but the book describes the process, building inspectors etc.

“Lofts—new dimension” because I want a second story if at all possible.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 30 Jul 2018, 22:53

Received two books today:

“Cherries” by D. J. Singh.

Published 2014 but outdated. Mentions cherry trees growing huge, bigger than apple trees. Not on dwarfing rootstocks they don’t.

The other one will be much more useful—remember my concern with the rootstock my cherries are on, Semi dwarfing Colt rootstock.

“Grow a little fruit tree” by Ann Ralph. Keeping trees to a useful size by pruning.

With dwarf rootstocks and pruning you can grow fruit trees even on a balcony!

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 29 Jul 2018, 16:15

Pretty much everybody here could grow citrus and granny smith apples. Grannies grow—and fruit—in Sydney, practically no chill hours needed.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 29 Jul 2018, 16:01

https://www.orangepippintrees.com/articles/fruit-tree-advice/rootstocks-for-cherry-trees

(a VERY useful site for anybody contemplating planting a fruit tree or two. Think I have mentioned this site before. If more people grew more of their own fruit & veges food miles would be a bit less. Having chickens not only gives you incredibly tasty, truly fresh eggs it helps with growing food. Free fertiliser is the least part of it! OK, sermon over.)

Colt semi-vigorous rootstock
This rootstock is a form of the seedling cherry Prunus avium, crossed with the less vigorous Prunus pseudocerasus.

It is a good rootstock for growing cherry trees in large gardens and community orchards. It produces a tree with a height of 12ft-14ft in European conditions and somewhat larger in North American conditions. It tolerates poorer soils than Gisela 5 and needs less looking after. It's also useful for large cherry fans. Colt is roughly comparable to the apple MM111 rootstock.

Colt has good compatibility with nearly all cherry varieties, possibly excluding Van, and some resistance to bacterial canker.

It's main drawback in US conditions is that it is not particularly cold-hardy.


Cold hardy—they mean -10°F, nothing like that where I am, thankfully! Colt doesn’t mind clay soil either so that’s good! But that 12–14' can be controlled, 3m is plenty!

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 29 Jul 2018, 15:44

https://www.chrisbowers.co.uk/guides/cherry-trees.php

Excellent! Even for cherry trees on colt rootstock (only semi-dwarfing) the trees can be controlled for size with pruning and “bending.” So I can plant them on 2500mm centres in rows 4 & 5, leaving plenty of room for dwarf eating apples or perry pears. Perry is a finer drink than cider so I think I will push on with perry pears trees, order them April next year and plant them April 2020 or maybe get them planted by someone there next april.

Long distance gardening is not easy. From next year my cherry trees will be delivering pretty good crops—will tell my neighbors to net the trees and pick the cherries and maybe check the irrigation system or do a bit of weeding in return.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Jul 2018, 11:38

Ordered 8 cubic metres pine chips. That will see all the rows where the cider apple and cherry trees (+ perry pears?) will get covered with pine chips. That will start amending the clay soil. With the soil in the rows covered the sun can’t bake the clay and soil critters—worms, ground beetles/spiders etc—will eat the chips and drag them into the soil, amending it.

One whole row and three quarters of a second row have already been covered—I had made an egregious error in calculating the amount of chips needed :oops

Row4.jpg

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 13 Jul 2018, 08:28

Bought this book from Book Depository just now:

Grow a Little Fruit Tree (Paperback)
By (author) Anna Ralph

How to keep trees small by pruning—think will need this for the cherry trees! Bought a book on how to grow cherry trees, won’t hurt. The “Grow a Little Fruit Tree” book was highly recommended so have some hopes. Colt can be grown as fans—BIG fans. Oh well.

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 03 Jul 2018, 09:32

In your dreams LOL!

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by johnsmith » 03 Jul 2018, 08:47

HBS Guy wrote:Bring your own tent!


no problem. I have an 8 man tent ... I can even rent rooms it it to swedish female backpackers. :meet

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 03 Jul 2018, 08:29

Bring your own tent!

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by johnsmith » 03 Jul 2018, 08:02

HBS Guy wrote:Might have some cherry brandy too, by then. And cider and perry, and cyser and peary and cherry melomel!


i won't make it inside for any brandy, I'll be camped by the fig tree for as long as it takes me to eat all the fruit

Re: Well, THAT was a shock to the system

Post by HBS Guy » 03 Jul 2018, 00:05

Might have some cherry brandy too, by then. And cider and perry, and cyser and peary and cherry melomel!

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