Brewing beer

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Expand view Topic review: Brewing beer

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 13 May 2019, 13:59

I am guessing using 2 sachets of hydrated yeast was too much. It was bubbling every 3 seconds early on, which is very fast
Either one sachet hydrated or 2 dry would be ok.

If it is stuck again, will sprinkle in 20 gms of raw sugar.
Should be interesting.

I nursed one other brew through that got stuck.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 13 May 2019, 10:34

Your wort was supersaturated with CO2, the new yeast provided nucleation sites. That was the rapid bubbling.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 13 May 2019, 10:05

The fermentor was not airtight. I sanded the manufacturing marks where the O-Ring goes to make it airtight.
The airlock was not airtight, I sanded the construction marks on either side of that and use thread tape to make that airtight.
In my setup, the bubble frequency is a good indicator. The SG has the final say.

SG was 1.020, it had stalled. Stirred it up, no change.
Added a sachet of yeast (dried), it immediately bubbled through the airlock with nonstop bubbles. That was weird. Could not have been the new yeast working yet.
Then it slowed down to on every 11 seconds.

Next day SG was 1.014. Aiming for 1.0095 so still some to go.
Raised temp to 21 degrees to help it along.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 13 May 2019, 09:41

Don’t worry about bubbles, the plastic fermenters we use are not airtight.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 12 May 2019, 09:47

Well done. You managed an answer. Top marks

' ....... Simple little kit beer, bottle after 2 weeks AS LONG as the hydrometer tells you the ferment is finished.............'

This ferment has stalled. I put in another packet of yeast this morning, It started off almost immediately. Was bubbling nonstop.
Has now settled on a bubble every 11 seconds

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 11 May 2019, 17:47

Depends:

1. How flocculant is the yeast?

2. Ferment temperature, how well you aerated the wort etc.

3. When the hydrometer shows the ferment is finished with FG = OG/4

I would then rack the beer to a 20L “cube” bung it in a fridge and leave it there for 2 weeks then rack the beer to a bottling bucket add priming etc.

Simple little kit beer, bottle after 2 weeks AS LONG as the hydrometer tells you the ferment is finished.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 11 May 2019, 09:09

How many days do you think it will be read to bottle ?

here is the information '...... Had extra yeast so put 2 packs in. (rehydrated the yeast)
Set fermenter to 18 degrees. It started to ferment within 4 hours. ........'


oh, sorry. Forgot you do not answer questions.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 10 May 2019, 18:27

Do NOT rely on airlock bubbling! Use your hydrometer!

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 10 May 2019, 07:28

I think it will be ready to bottle this weekend.
Have not checked the SG yet but the bubbles through the airlock have pretty much stopped.

Got the empty bottles cleaned out last night, they are inverted in the sun getting sanatised.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 08 May 2019, 11:35

Sprintcyclist wrote:I put a brew down on saturday arvo.
Took me a few hours, should be ready to drink in 3 weeks, tops.

Had extra yeast so put 2 packs in. (rehydrated the yeast)
Set fermenter to 18 degrees. It started to ferment within 4 hours.


Yep, mine will be well ready to be drunk by election night.

Yours ??

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 07 May 2019, 09:32

I put a brew down on saturday arvo.
Took me a few hours, should be ready to drink in 3 weeks, tops.

Had extra yeast so put 2 packs in. (rehydrated the yeast)
Set fermenter to 18 degrees. It started to ferment within 4 hours.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 03 May 2019, 14:42

I will set up a half size brewery once I am living in Tassie. In winter when the cider and perry are sitting in their demijohns and carboys (height of home brew humor: demijanes and cargirls, sorry) hopefully fermenting or keeving I will do some brewing.

30L kettle, 30l temperature-controlled urn, 20L eskey, mash 5-6Kg grain, sparge, boil, recharge the mashtun, mash in the second half of the brew, run out the first boil, half fill the fermenter, run in the second wort, boil that etc—full size brew of 10–12%abv.

Inefficient mashes which is GOOD! Some brewers get carried away wanting to get higher and higher efficiency. Me, I prefer to add another Kg grain, $4-5 tops, and stop sparging too soon, thick runnings, no husky tastes etc. Best beer I ever made I did that way, calculated the malt bill, added 1Kg, stopped sparging at a nice high SG. Malt was all Golden Promise (Maris Otter malt grown in Scotland) and hopped with all East Kent Goldings plugs.

Beautiful beer: smooth and malty, aromatic and bitter with all Goldings. Pure! Golden in color. My English uncle kept exclaiming “This is a really well made beer” as he drank a glass or three. Yes, I could have finished with Fuggles or an American hop like Amarillo but there is something special about a one malt, one hop beer.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 03 May 2019, 10:23

Will be putting on another brew this weekend

Already have the kit ready to go.
Probably will NOT rehydrate the yeast ............just throw it in like dirty smelly kids sports clothes into a washing machine.
Will be quick and easy. And, it'll be a perfect brew. Just like the last few.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 02 May 2019, 11:35

Hey, it is a quiet day here.

I am bored

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 02 May 2019, 11:34

Image

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 02 May 2019, 11:33

Sprintcyclist wrote:The experts say dry pitch the yeast

https://fermentis.com/en/news-from-fermentis/technical-reviews/e2u-direct-pitching/

.................... the first results of a new study in which 3 different rehydration procedures, i.e. rehydration at 30°C with moderate agitation, rehydration in 15°P wort at 20°C with moderate agitation and direct pitch without rehydration, indicate no significant differences in fermentation performance for all tested ale yeasts (SafAle™ S-04, SafAle™ US-05, SafAle™ K-97, SafAle™ S-33, SafAle™ WB-06, SafAle™ BE-256, SafAle™ T-58, SafAle™ BE-134) and lager yeasts (SafLager™ S-23, SafLager™ S-189 and SafLager™ W-34/70). At the end of fermentations, no significant differences in concentration of ethanol, residual sugars and volatiles (acetaldehyde, esters, higher alcohols and vicinal diketones) between rehydration procedures were observed (see figure 2). This indicates that the direct pitching procedure is adequate for fermentation..................

..................... In practice, the consecutive steps for direct pitching are
• Fill the fermenter with 1/3 of the wort volume (up to the top of the CKT cone) at a temperature of 21-29 °C
• Sprinkle the active dry yeast cells directly in the fermenter
• Add the remaining 2/3 of the volume of wort at fermentation temperature to allow for mixing of yeast and wort.
The new direct pitch procedure further simplifies fermentation in practice as it eliminates the need for rehydration of the active dry yeast prior to the process. The complete study including all results of the testing of the specially treated dried yeasts from Fermentis (called E2U™) produced specifically for being used with the ‘Direct Pitch’ procedure will be publically available soon ...................



So you did all the equivalent testing ?

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 02 May 2019, 09:18

Yeast kit manufacturers have to make sure even yobbos will get the yeast working.

Rehydrate your dry yeast, do not be lazy.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 02 May 2019, 08:56

yes, you did not answer the question.
You waffled on heaps of stuff I had no interest in at all. Some might say 'explained in detail', but that was not what I asked.
When you finally answered it, you got the answer wrong ! I proved it myself.


There is no reason for me to be ' ...... past kit brewing by now ...... ' or not.


Oh, yes, you also disagree with directions yeast manufacturers give after doing scientific experiments.
They would know best.


Getting the answer by googling.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 02 May 2019, 08:17

After I explained in detail about the use of dried malt extract and got abuse back I am not inclined to answer your brewing questions anymore Sprinty.

Anyway, I have only rarely used dry yeasts in my brewing, preferring the vast range of liquid yeasts (Wyeastlabs and WhiteLabs) which do cost but you can make a starter, split it, pitch three times so the cost is comparable to dry yeast.

You should be past kit brewing by now.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 02 May 2019, 07:47

Gosh, I have a brewing question.

But no brewer here can answer a question.
Will just google, see if anyone else has asked the same question.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 16 Jan 2019, 12:00

Interesting blog chats

.............. Postby 50% Mogman » Thursday Jan 26, 2006 4:15 am

The Thomas Coopers Australian Bitter is a very nice beer.
My beer of choice at the moment.
I made two batches....one with the kit yeast and the other with Safale04.
The Coopers yeast brings out the flavours better.
The next batch I make will definately be done with the supplied yeast and 1.5kg light liquid malt (as per instructions).
Bloody good kit, nine out of ten.

John....


....................... definately becomes quite dark the aussie bitter. I have to say though, that to my taste it is actually quite bitter, and not even remotely like VB of course. Quite identifiably coopers I think, mine turned out not dissimilar from CPA at all.

these kits are generally recomended sto be made with all malt, not dex and a little malt like the other ranges, so i sort of expected them to have a little more bitterness to them to balance the recomended ingredients. I'd really love to know what coopers actually does different! Apart from only selling through HBS' :? ................



http://homebrewandbeer.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2102

The owner of the local home brew shop said the Thomas Coopers yeast is quite good.
I was not sold on it initially, but this batch is improving well with age.
Still tend to prefer SafeAle US05

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 11 Jan 2019, 20:16

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 11 Jan 2019, 20:11

It is easier and surer but not better.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by Sprintcyclist » 11 Jan 2019, 18:37

HBS Guy wrote:I would treat that with a bit of caution.

Dry yeast needs to absorb water via osmosis so the less sugar in the rehydration water the faster the yeast will rehydrate. Then the cell looks after its cell walls and only after that, 30 minutes after pitching is the yeast ready to eat, reproduce etc.

But direct pitching is easier, less chance for things to go wrong. Probably why they published the paper.

I will rehydrate dry yeast every time but do prefer liquid yeasts.


I started off with dry pitching, then rehydrating.

The reason I will revert to dry pitching is this test was done by the yeast manufacturers.
They have a positive vested interest
They would be thorough, scientific and very careful that they are giving the best information.
They want their customers to have the best experience possible
If they make a big mistake, it will cost them customers.
If it is good advice, they will win customers.

Re: Brewing beer

Post by HBS Guy » 11 Jan 2019, 17:47

I want to have a tour through Boags this April, will start enquiring about that. Did enjoy some Boags in the past and drink it on the ferry across Bass Strait.

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