Gardening

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Expand view Topic review: Gardening

Re: Gardening

Post by MonkSIPPING » 08 Nov 2018, 13:17

At night, piss on the plants.

Failing that, spray Charlie Carp (quick nitrogen) and Seasol seaweed extract (plant tonic) late afternoon.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 08 Nov 2018, 08:56

johnsmith wrote:damn ... the sun is killing my new plants. :mad


Drat, yes, the sun here in QLD can kill plants in 1 day.

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 06 Nov 2018, 14:57

damn ... the sun is killing my new plants. :mad

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 06 Nov 2018, 11:35

Ordered a booklet on Gardening in Clay Soil.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 05 Nov 2018, 16:02

I am sure some of my trees will cark it, just trying to load the odds in my favor.

Some things, like spreading pine chips, are wrong but I am doing it anyway for dropping the pH of my soil. Once the trees are planted I will have hardwood chips spread. Do that twice a year, spread some iron sulphate and a bit pot. sulphate and some fine (colloidal) sulphur to counteract the alkalinity of the hardwood chips. Will try and get the hardwood chips cheap—any electricity workers trimming trees under power lines, carton of beer for a truckload of chips sounds good to me!

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 05 Nov 2018, 13:00

Your gardening will go MUCH better than our forest.

A failure rate is normal on our gardens.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 05 Nov 2018, 06:53

My garden in Tassie has difficult soil and I never grew cherry trees before, etc, so been reading.

If you want to protect the trees in your butterfly forest there is a spray you make up with unpasteurised neem oil, fish hydrolysate and compost tea. Adding some mycorrhizal fungi culture would be good too.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 04 Nov 2018, 23:41

HBS Guy wrote:I was a bit worried that I had added too much gypsum to my soil: guy that rotary hoed all the backpart spread 30 bags of gypsum, then I added another bag of gypsum where the cider trees will go. Need not have worried! Will be applying gypsum for a while yet! Any excess magnesium will be bound to some of the gypsum and gradually flushed from the soil.

To acidify my soil a bit I will add iron sulphate. Not only will this acidify the soil some but makes lots of iron available. Iron and boron are less accessible in alkaline soils. So some boron will be added to the planting holes somehow. I have calculated how much iron sulphate to add, converting those quirky units the yanks still use, pounds and square feet, so quaint :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin

One of the most superb eating apples is the Cox Orange Pippin. My nursery only supplies this on dwarfing rootstock: no way, my soil (for want of a better word) really needs the M111 semi dwarfing rootstock. Sent the nursery an email—can you do me a Cox on M111 rootstock? Have seen another nursery lists the Cox and that would be semi dwarfing rootstock. If I have time next April I will go visit them.

Have made a list—preliminary of course, will likely change—of some semidwarf desert apples to get:

Bramley’s Seedling—premier UK cooking apple

Court Pendu Plat—brought to Europe by the Romans 1500 years ago, how could I not get it? Besides, late apple so stores well and help pollinate late blossoming cider apple trees

Granny Smith—eating, cooking, add some acidity to a cider that needs it. Pick in June.

Huonville crab apple—a chance seedling. Palm sized red skinned, red fleshed and red juiced crabs, good to eat, cook or use in cider

McIntosh—eating apple. Thank god the designer or signwriter got the name wrong and so my computer is a Macintosh not a McIntosh. Canadian.

Sturmer—all rounder.

Will want another crab apple or two:

John Downie—https://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au/crab-apples/98-john-downie.html great for apple pectin jelly.
Could plant a decorative (never or rarely fruits) crab somewhere, look nice and still helps pollinate all my apple trees.



you know a lot more about gardening than I do

Good luck with it all

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 04 Nov 2018, 20:42

The wife also bought an assortment of packets of seeds, but she must have confused our place for the acerage up the road. :roll




:rofl

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 04 Nov 2018, 19:55

johnsmith wrote:
HBS Guy wrote:You NEED to take your soil pH. That is bedrock stuff. Buy a kit, buy a cheap pH meter buy both. If it is acid (pH under 7) you need lime, if it is alkaline (pH > 7) no lime, use gypsum. Spread some potassium sulphate, more if you have alkaline soil.

Dig in lots of organic matter, compost and cow or sheep poop. Spread mulch to stop the sun baking your soil. Gardening 101.



I filled my garden bed with bags of soil specifically for tomatoes and vege's. Bed is about 4 inches deep, with plenty of drainage since it sits atop a retaining wall.

Image



completed the next section of my vege patch today. Swapped from bags of soil, this time I took the ute to a landscape supplier and got a half ton of organic soil (has organic compost mixed in with it) .. I got the kids to do the hard work, shoveling it into a wheelbarrow ( in 30degree heat ... the little troopers did a great job) spread it and added some blood and bone, then planted cos lettuce, butterhead lettuce, eggplant, snow peas, silverbeet, spring onion and cucumber.

The wife also bought an assortment of packets of seeds, but she must have confused our place for the acerage up the road. :roll

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 04 Nov 2018, 15:03

I was a bit worried that I had added too much gypsum to my soil: guy that rotary hoed all the backpart spread 30 bags of gypsum, then I added another bag of gypsum where the cider trees will go. Need not have worried! Will be applying gypsum for a while yet! Any excess magnesium will be bound to some of the gypsum and gradually flushed from the soil.

To acidify my soil a bit I will add iron sulphate. Not only will this acidify the soil some but makes lots of iron available. Iron and boron are less accessible in alkaline soils. So some boron will be added to the planting holes somehow. I have calculated how much iron sulphate to add, converting those quirky units the yanks still use, pounds and square feet, so quaint :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin

One of the most superb eating apples is the Cox Orange Pippin. My nursery only supplies this on dwarfing rootstock: no way, my soil (for want of a better word) really needs the M111 semi dwarfing rootstock. Sent the nursery an email—can you do me a Cox on M111 rootstock? Have seen another nursery lists the Cox and that would be semi dwarfing rootstock. If I have time next April I will go visit them.

Have made a list—preliminary of course, will likely change—of some semidwarf desert apples to get:

Bramley’s Seedling—premier UK cooking apple

Court Pendu Plat—brought to Europe by the Romans 1500 years ago, how could I not get it? Besides, late apple so stores well and help pollinate late blossoming cider apple trees

Granny Smith—eating, cooking, add some acidity to a cider that needs it. Pick in June.

Huonville crab apple—a chance seedling. Palm sized red skinned, red fleshed and red juiced crabs, good to eat, cook or use in cider

McIntosh—eating apple. Thank god the designer or signwriter got the name wrong and so my computer is a Macintosh not a McIntosh. Canadian.

Sturmer—all rounder.

Will want another crab apple or two:

John Downie—https://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au/crab-apples/98-john-downie.html great for apple pectin jelly.
Could plant a decorative (never or rarely fruits) crab somewhere, look nice and still helps pollinate all my apple trees.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 30 Oct 2018, 01:35

Yeah, looking at a much more detailed map I doubt I have limestone as bedrock. Phew!

Acid test (pun not intended) will be adding vinegar to a small sample of soil next April, along with determining pH as accurately as I can.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 30 Oct 2018, 00:16

Depending on what bedrock is beneath my 4' of clay masquerading as soil I should be able to reduce the pH of my alkaline soil somewhat.

One test I will do: buy some malt vinegar at the local shops and pour some onto some soil—if it fizzes it has calcium carbonate and pH will be practically impossible to shift. Looking at the geological map of Tassie—reckon more some igneous rock. Then some iron sulphate might do the trick with compost and mulch etc will keep it a bit lower than what it is at present. There are some little orchards like mine in the same soil so here is hoping. In fact, my next door neighbor to be has a row of trees on his block.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 27 Oct 2018, 23:05

Rereading “Grow a little fruit tree” and decided to buy a few semi-dwarf eating/cooking and crab apples, plant them between the cider apple trees.

Root competition will keep all the trees small and manageable. More trees, better pollination—maybe ensure one at least late blossoming tree to help pollinates the one or two late blossoming cider apples. Unfortunately, Cox Orange Pippin is not available in semi-dwarf form—the M111 semi dwarfing rootstock grows deep and extensive enough to keep the tree upright without needing a permanent stake and can cope with clay soils, dwarf trees need much more pampering. Definitely MUCH better to buy semi-dwarf fruit trees and use bending of branches and stem and pruning for size in the summer equinox, around Christmass time in Australia. Stronger trees yet manageable size/amount of fruit harvested.

Order them in April next year, plant April 2020.

Re: Gardening

Post by Cracky » 26 Oct 2018, 20:34

Thankee! :hlo

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 26 Oct 2018, 17:55

Nice to see you post, Cracky!

Re: Gardening

Post by Cracky » 26 Oct 2018, 12:06

dissilymordentroge wrote:If Adam or Eve were silly enough to bite into a raw quince they’d have eaten none of it. Raw quince produces a very nasty prickly sensation in the mouth which lingers for hours. Truly horrible.

Agreed.

Re: Gardening

Post by Cracky » 26 Oct 2018, 12:02

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 22:43

johnsmith wrote:
Aussie wrote:Which is the quince tree?


the forbidden fruit from the garden of eden

If Adam or Eve were silly enough to bite into a raw quince they’d have eaten none of it. Raw quince produces a very nasty prickly sensation in the mouth which lingers for hours. Truly horrible.

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 22:41

Aussie wrote:Excuse this Cane Toad. Which is the quince tree?

:?

Top right with the white blossoms.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 20 Oct 2018, 21:52

Can’t eat a quince raw!

Going to buy another note book and will write that recipe down. Also sloe gin.

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 20 Oct 2018, 21:10

Aussie wrote:Which is the quince tree?


the forbidden fruit from the garden of eden

Re: Gardening

Post by Aussie » 20 Oct 2018, 21:00

Excuse this Cane Toad. Which is the quince tree?

:?

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 20:39

HBS Guy wrote:170 years old! Has to be a seedling with that longevity.

So you do some fermenting and distilling?

No, no fermenting or distilling here but I have dabbled in the past when working for a wine maker in Victoria as his cellar door chef. Made as attempt at my own beer once but it was a disaster.
The tree may be a seeding for all I know. Seven years ago a seedling grew up underneath is. Gave it to friends up the road who are now harvesting fruit identical to the mother tree.
It blew down in a storm 14 years ago. The tree surgeon I consulted told me it wouldn’t survive and to remove it. So I planted another but never got around to removing the old one as it’s gone on producing bumper crops every year since.
The quince liqueur recipe I use is medieval in origin. The quinces are grated into a stainless steel containers, covered and place in cool dark place for four days. The come out looking like something a cow left behind in the paddock. This is then squeezed by hand through multiple layers of muslin to extract the juice which even at this stage tastes wonderful. An equal quantity of vodka is added (some add brandy or bourbon but I reckon these ruin the final product). Raw sugar, a small amount of clove and cinnamon is added and shaken to dissolve then returned in large glass bottles to a dark, cool place for four months. My impression is the alcohol content increases during this last stage but I’m told that’s not possible. Whatever, the result is delicious rocket fuel.

[url][URL=http://s185.photobucket.com/user/pickleberry_photos/media/DSCF3816_zpsiw9zjgpg.jpg.html]Image[/url]

Image[/url]

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 20 Oct 2018, 08:10

170 years old! Has to be a seedling with that longevity.

So you do some fermenting and distilling?

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