Gardening

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Expand view Topic review: Gardening

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 19 Apr 2019, 21:53

HBS Guy wrote:The guy will get a decent post hole digger like he rented a decent rotary hoe. If not will tell him to get a decent one! The clay is hard, arms would be broken for sure!


That was exactly my understanding of the probable result of using a cheap hand held post hole digger.

I have never used one

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 19 Apr 2019, 18:32

The guy will get a decent post hole digger like he rented a decent rotary hoe. If not will tell him to get a decent one! The clay is hard, arms would be broken for sure!

Re: Gardening

Post by Aussie » 19 Apr 2019, 18:12

Sprintcyclist wrote:apparently the hand held post hole diggers are really dangerous.

the ones on a PTO on a dingo or something are good


Yes. There is significant torque there. If the dirt does not give way......the bloke holding it is in deep shit.

I had an old manual auge which was great.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 19 Apr 2019, 18:04

apparently the hand held post hole diggers are really dangerous.

the ones on a PTO on a dingo or something are good

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 19 Apr 2019, 16:39

Soils will largely determine what pH they will be. Organic material, compost, mulch, seem good and safe things to use, turn clay or sand into soil (takes longer with sand) and don’t do soil pH any harm either.

Tuesday for the posts: bloke was going to hand dig the holes. I laughed for like 40 minutes. No post hole diggers to be found till after Easter.

I need to get my trees delivered and the orchard that was going to take my too-mature trees reminded to come and pick them up. Then Wed–Thu plant the first actual fucking trees in my block! YAY!

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 19 Apr 2019, 11:56

HBS Guy wrote:Hard work, this gardening!

Where I worked last year the soil is much improved. The pine chicps have chipped (sorry) the pH back to 8 from over 8. With the oyster mushroom compost and iron sulphate should bring it closer to ideal: just under 7. I hope. Maybe next year a sparse application of superphosphate and potassium sulphate will do the job but will be ongoing battle for a while, soils like a certain pH but I will keep plugging away. I see critters in the soil, a slater or two and an earthworm so all good. 15 bales of pea straw delivered, hope to get some alfalfa/lucerne hay as well.

Tomorrow rotary hoeing and placing of posts so I can espalier the perry pear trees once they arrive in spring.

2 rows of 4 cider apple trees—semi dwarf trees

3 rows of perry pears incl beurre bosc and its pollinators.

One row close planted cherry/peach/cooking/eating/cider apples.

I met my neighbors to the south of my block—they own 1.2Ha altogether incl the block next to mine and land behind my and other blocks—he is going to build a house and the rest of the 1.2Ha will be garden! How good is that! Some nice peace and quiet, flowers everywhere! Nice people.


That is very good news.

The soil here was a bit acidic. Had pine trees growing here.
Had the pines removed, mulched the soil well for over a year, added 'organic extra' and the soils pH reverted to a neutral area.
It 'fixed' itself.

A friend of mine has a degree in horticulture, she said do not add chemicals to correct a pH problem.
If you get it wrong, you can't grow much in there for a very long time.
Adding mulch and organic things is a safer thing to do.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 19 Apr 2019, 10:28

Sourdough with Tassie hit smoked salmon then fresh raspberries with Meander Valley thick cream. Think I can rough it out down here for another week.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 18 Apr 2019, 16:24

4 x 1m wide strips rotary hoed. Poles supplied, need a posthole digger, all rented by people building pergolas etc over easter.

The rotary hoeing took a few hours: $140, very resonable. Bluey sort of supervised the young bloke actually operating the machine tho helped get the pine chips out of the way. I gave the young bloke $20 “to get a beer” and well deserved.

I bought (well, I bought 100, way too many but there you go, cheap enough anyway) flags on still wire. Pressed it carefully into the ground until it started to bend:

Site 1: near the front, nothing done: 73mm: pH: 8

Site 2: work done, pine chips added rather later than Site 3: 172mm pH sliver under 8

Site 3: one of the spots I dug in gypsum and sheepshit etc and got covered by pine chips back in June last year: 191mm. pH 7. A full pH point less because of the pine chips! Wonderful!

Some of the extra penetration (ooh err missus) could be because the mulch, the pine chips, kept the soil moister?

Loving the drop in pH! Now will hit it with oyster mushroom compost.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Apr 2019, 17:15

Hard work, this gardening!

Where I worked last year the soil is much improved. The pine chicps have chipped (sorry) the pH back to 8 from over 8. With the oyster mushroom compost and iron sulphate should bring it closer to ideal: just under 7. I hope. Maybe next year a sparse application of superphosphate and potassium sulphate will do the job but will be ongoing battle for a while, soils like a certain pH but I will keep plugging away. I see critters in the soil, a slater or two and an earthworm so all good. 15 bales of pea straw delivered, hope to get some alfalfa/lucerne hay as well.

Tomorrow rotary hoeing and placing of posts so I can espalier the perry pear trees once they arrive in spring.

2 rows of 4 cider apple trees—semi dwarf trees

3 rows of perry pears incl beurre bosc and its pollinators.

One row close planted cherry/peach/cooking/eating/cider apples.

I met my neighbors to the south of my block—they own 1.2Ha altogether incl the block next to mine and land behind my and other blocks—he is going to build a house and the rest of the 1.2Ha will be garden! How good is that! Some nice peace and quiet, flowers everywhere! Nice people.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Apr 2019, 23:36

Found not just the skin but the skeleton of a little snake in my garden. Will take a picture when I find it again.

I also startled a rabbit, christ those little fuckers can run!

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Apr 2019, 08:11

Limited time here.

Re: Gardening

Post by pinkeye » 16 Apr 2019, 02:20

HBS Guy wrote:I need to buy some shelving, getting to be too much stuff to just put on the floor. Also going to buy some oyster mushroom compost—nice and acidic. Rake up the pine chips, dump them where the long row of berries will go. Have found a plant nursery selling suitable callistemons, bottle brush shrubs, to plant as a bit of a hedge in front of the fruit trees. The more you plant, the more you interplant the more robust your garden is.


You can make shelving out of all sorts of things... don't need to buy it at a mega-store.

Re: Gardening

Post by pinkeye » 16 Apr 2019, 01:13

HBS Guy wrote:I need to buy some shelving, getting to be too much stuff to just put on the floor. Also going to buy some oyster mushroom compost—nice and acidic. Rake up the pine chips, dump them where the long row of berries will go. Have found a plant nursery selling suitable callistemons, bottle brush shrubs, to plant as a bit of a hedge in front of the fruit trees. The more you plant, the more you interplant the more robust your garden is.



Well it is always good to plant local natives. They will thrive. LOCAL natives... try to plant what are called Pioneer species, if you are starting on a bald patch of denuded land. They draw nitrogen to the /surface/service and provide a tough habitat... takes time. You can plant all the exotics you like, but you'll find they don't all thrive.

Better to establish a living ecosystem before too many exotics are introduced. I Have NO citrus growing, and no other exotics, except a barren Custard Apple Tree.. ( no nearby alt-sex plant) but I get the odd Pineapple and Deliciosa and Chilli ( lots of chili) and Curry leaf.. but you see , as no doubt u do, it relates to local conditions.. local plants are the go..

Re: Gardening

Post by pinkeye » 16 Apr 2019, 01:02

Nothing beats the sound of the first early morning birds… the cheeps and burbles start just before sun up.
Then ..
The Kookas and the Crows . Butcherbirds and Magpies....

THEN I hear some distant traffic at peak commute time, then all lapses back into somnolent sunshine, light wind through leaves, and birds arguing … snooze is bliss. :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin


Which, incidentally, is one of the reasons I post so late/early. I see the dawn, and then , I'll go to sleep. :thumb

Re: Gardening

Post by greggerypeccary » 15 Apr 2019, 14:29

johnsmith wrote:
Aussie wrote: Better temps than Brisbane, (where I believe you are,)


I thought sprinty was in my neck of the woods ..... or maybe I am thinking of aquascoot


I'm pretty sure aquascoot lives on another planet.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 15 Apr 2019, 10:00

Wow, seems a lot of Boomers are moving to Tassie. Nice! Now if only the local councils and Taswater would stop ripping rate payers off blind it might actually happen.

The joys of country life: wallabies (think little ’roos) possums and rabbits all after your produce!

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 14 Apr 2019, 20:03

Sprintcyclist wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
Aussie wrote: Better temps than Brisbane, (where I believe you are,)


I thought sprinty was in my neck of the woods ..... or maybe I am thinking of aquascoot


South of Brisbane.
Surburbia, I quite like it here so no big rush to move



cool. Some nice spots south of brisse.
My work is in Ormeau / pimpama which is more than halfway to brissie anyway. Some lovely spots

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 14 Apr 2019, 19:43

johnsmith wrote:
Aussie wrote: Better temps than Brisbane, (where I believe you are,)


I thought sprinty was in my neck of the woods ..... or maybe I am thinking of aquascoot


South of Brisbane.
Surburbia, I quite like it here so no big rush to move

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 14 Apr 2019, 18:51

Aussie wrote: Better temps than Brisbane, (where I believe you are,)


I thought sprinty was in my neck of the woods ..... or maybe I am thinking of aquascoot

Re: Gardening

Post by Aussie » 14 Apr 2019, 18:19

Sprintcyclist wrote:
pinkeye wrote:Living in the Country ( so to speak) has many rewards.


wonder if we should look to a country place to retire in ?


First class medical facilities in Bundaberg (in your State) with a dedicated 24 hour medivac helicopter service to a major hospital if required. Regular air services to Brisbane. Better temps than Brisbane, (where I believe you are,) easy to get around and very moderate prices. Every service and retail outlook which exists in Brisbane. Churches everywhere. Unemployment is high and there is a drug issue which is no greater than where you are. Have a Google on those prices and Homes currently on the market.

I'd love to go back, but business and Family mean we are 'stuck' here in this Paradise.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 14 Apr 2019, 18:08

johnsmith wrote:
Sprintcyclist wrote:
pinkeye wrote:Living in the Country ( so to speak) has many rewards.


wonder if we should look to a country place to retire in ?


the pro's are that it's usually safer, certainly quieter, and if you move into a small town, you are more a part of the community

the con, and it's a biggie for older folks, is that medical resources are fewer and further between ... at a point in your life when you'll be needing them more and more


you also need to look at the type of property you are buying ... no good getting acreage that you won't be able to maintain in a few years time.


Also, another issue that has crept up in recent years is that in some towns ICE is an epidemic. Do your homework on the town thoroughly before you buy.


thanks, they are good points

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 14 Apr 2019, 17:20

Sprintcyclist wrote:
pinkeye wrote:Living in the Country ( so to speak) has many rewards.


wonder if we should look to a country place to retire in ?


the pro's are that it's usually safer, certainly quieter, and if you move into a small town, you are more a part of the community

the con, and it's a biggie for older folks, is that medical resources are fewer and further between ... at a point in your life when you'll be needing them more and more


you also need to look at the type of property you are buying ... no good getting acreage that you won't be able to maintain in a few years time.


Also, another issue that has crept up in recent years is that in some towns ICE is an epidemic. Do your homework on the town thoroughly before you buy.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 14 Apr 2019, 16:23

I would if I were you, Sprint! Whole new lifestyle to get used to—that keeps your brain going. It is quieter, much less traffic, hardly any sirens, people are friendlier etc etc.

There were two triggers to get me to moving to Tassie (actually three: real estate is dirt cheap in country towns—no jobs for lots of people:)

1. Adelaide is just getting too fucking hot!

2. Traffic, early Sunday morning traffic was like peak hour used to be.

You will find some things more expensive: a tradie or supplies need to come from the nearest big town so big $$$ travelling.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 14 Apr 2019, 14:56

pinkeye wrote:Living in the Country ( so to speak) has many rewards.


wonder if we should look to a country place to retire in ?

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 14 Apr 2019, 08:33

I need to buy some shelving, getting to be too much stuff to just put on the floor. Also going to buy some oyster mushroom compost—nice and acidic. Rake up the pine chips, dump them where the long row of berries will go. Have found a plant nursery selling suitable callistemons, bottle brush shrubs, to plant as a bit of a hedge in front of the fruit trees. The more you plant, the more you interplant the more robust your garden is.

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