Gardening

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Expand view Topic review: Gardening

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Nov 2018, 18:15

Quince can be quite pear shaped.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 17 Nov 2018, 18:04

HBS Guy wrote:Nashi and quince.


Ah, well ......... I was nowhere near it !!!!!!!!

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Nov 2018, 16:29

Nashi and quince.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Nov 2018, 12:33

Nope—not pome fruit, seeds everywhere, not in a core.

Neither fruit begins with a “p”

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 17 Nov 2018, 12:15

HBS Guy wrote:A perry pear can be a hard, astringent thing to eat. Not even pigs will eat them and pigs will eat about anything. I read an account of a squirrel eating a perry pear: it ate and spat out the flesh until it got to the core and then it ate the pips!

Some are pears that can be eaten save there are better eating varieties now.

Fun fact: apples float on water, pears sink.

What other two fruits are in the pome fruit family?


Pommegranites and Persimmons ?

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Nov 2018, 08:07

Depending on how much time I have in April I will prepare spots to plant some semi dwarf eating apples in the southern parts of the rows. Could also prepare spots for dwarf perry pear trees—be nice to have them going too! The trees to be planted in July or in spring when the soil is not soaking wet. Will need to prepare the spots for two more Yarlington Mill bittersweet cider apples—spread sand, compost, gypsum and sheep shit and some potassium sulphate and rock dust, spread that over a square metre, dig in as much as possible, hope the winter rain gets it further down.

If you have a semi-dwarf tree, be ruthless and cut the stem at about the 60cm mark, knee height. Branches will form—scaffold branches. This is the key to keeping the tree small and branches low and easy to reach. Obviously, this has not been done with my trees being looked after in Launceston but the younger trees I should still be able to do that. The trees from the year before they may be too old for that. They should have been planted in September but that trip had to be put off, so the trees will have had another summers growth by April unfortunately.

Will see what I can do. Especially with the cherry trees I have to be able to net them—not interested in feeding the birds! Bending may save the day. I will buy a bloody good pair of secateurs! Also stuff to put on cut surfaces—winter will follow with lots of rain and rot may happen.

Get the slasher guy to spread hardwood chips after I have gone.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Nov 2018, 07:39

A perry pear can be a hard, astringent thing to eat. Not even pigs will eat them and pigs will eat about anything. I read an account of a squirrel eating a perry pear: it ate and spat out the flesh until it got to the core and then it ate the pips!

Some are pears that can be eaten save there are better eating varieties now.

Fun fact: apples float on water, pears sink.

What other two fruits are in the pome fruit family?

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 17 Nov 2018, 03:26

HBS Guy wrote:Perry is the cider you make from pears. It is supposed to be a better drink than cider.
nic

AH, I have not heard of that before.
Pears are nicer than apples.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Nov 2018, 20:01

Perry is the cider you make from pears. It is supposed to be a better drink than cider.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 16 Nov 2018, 19:54

I had a thought while in the Butterfly Forest after work today for you.

It'll cost you near to $1000 to spend some time getting sore muscles in your garden.
That $1000 buys a lot of tree planting by a local . Don't go cheap on that guy for the tree planting.
Make it a great profit time for him that he can put a lot of pride in.

Invite him to share in your completed product in 3 years time.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 16 Nov 2018, 19:39

HBS Guy wrote:Gin:
(Can taste juniper berry, so it must be called Gin.)

Good disease resistance, good keeping quality (need to store pears to get good quantity to mill and press.)
Makes a fragrant perry (can see mixing this with some beurre bosc for nice pear flavor with the fragrance of the gin)

A high quality vintage pear being planted by artisan perry makers (of whom I hope to be one no matter how small scale and amateur!)


Green Horse:
Originally a culinary pear like some perry pears are (some perry pears are so unpalatable that not even pigs will eat them!)
Medium Sharp (as are all perry pears in Australia)


Moorcroft:
Use as a perry pear from start
Bittersharp (Astringent sharp) This makes it a bit unique among perry pears in Oz.
Problem with this pear: rots from the inside out fairly soon after picking. Thinks: one or two trees enough of this one, great mixer, too hard as a main perry pear. Pick and freeze until all harvested, I think.

Sounds like a mixer not a straight perry.


Yellow Huffcap:
Medium sharp. Medium acid, low tannin makes for an excellent perry.


So now you know!

Seth might be able to grow some nice perry pears in Oregon if he was so inclined. He would have access to a bigger range of perry pears than we do here. Makes a finer drink than cider or so I am told.



yes, 1 moorcroft might do.

what are perry pears ?

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 16 Nov 2018, 19:36

HBS Guy wrote:Bought some fresh cartridge paper, will draw my planting plan as it is so far and add to it future plantings—will add identification of each site.

Now some GOOD news! I can get Green Horse perry pears! Yippy! So perry pear line up is:

Gin
Moorcroft
Yellow Huffcap
Green Horse

And Beurre Bosc perry/cooking/eating pear
[Williams Pear—to pollinate Beurre Bosc]

More scope, more flavors. MUCH more reading/thinking to do. At my age it is use it or lose it!


I am feeling you

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Nov 2018, 18:18

Gin:
(Can taste juniper berry, so it must be called Gin.)

Good disease resistance, good keeping quality (need to store pears to get good quantity to mill and press.)
Makes a fragrant perry (can see mixing this with some beurre bosc for nice pear flavor with the fragrance of the gin)

A high quality vintage pear being planted by artisan perry makers (of whom I hope to be one no matter how small scale and amateur!)


Green Horse:
Originally a culinary pear like some perry pears are (some perry pears are so unpalatable that not even pigs will eat them!)
Medium Sharp (as are all perry pears in Australia)


Moorcroft:
Use as a perry pear from start
Bittersharp (Astringent sharp) This makes it a bit unique among perry pears in Oz.
Problem with this pear: rots from the inside out fairly soon after picking. Thinks: one or two trees enough of this one, great mixer, too hard as a main perry pear. Pick and freeze until all harvested, I think.

Sounds like a mixer not a straight perry.


Yellow Huffcap:
Medium sharp. Medium acid, low tannin makes for an excellent perry.


So now you know!

Seth might be able to grow some nice perry pears in Oregon if he was so inclined. He would have access to a bigger range of perry pears than we do here. Makes a finer drink than cider or so I am told.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Nov 2018, 17:15

Bought some fresh cartridge paper, will draw my planting plan as it is so far and add to it future plantings—will add identification of each site.

Now some GOOD news! I can get Green Horse perry pears! Yippy! So perry pear line up is:

Gin
Moorcroft
Yellow Huffcap
Green Horse

And Beurre Bosc perry/cooking/eating pear
[Williams Pear—to pollinate Beurre Bosc]

More scope, more flavors. MUCH more reading/thinking to do. At my age it is use it or lose it!

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 16 Nov 2018, 16:23

HBS Guy wrote:He has/will spread the pine chips for me, the remaining 8 cubic metres should be delivered and spread Monday. Can get him to do some spraying: give him a key to the garden shed, have the mix detailed (blow up to A3 size, have it laminated, leave in the shed.) Won’t have the compost tea but the neem oil, insecticidal soap (pure liquid soap (not detergent etc)) and fish hydrolase and liquid kelp will be there. Will have a tin of grease, grease the weedmat I will wrap around the trunks to deter rabbits and hopefully possums.

Will water around the planting hole with the compost tea, fish hydrolase and kelp after planting, plain water to water the actual tree—encourage the roots to venture out the planting hole.


Sounds good, give him a plan of what you want planted where.
A numbered list of things to do in order of importance.

Accept it won't be done exactly how you want ........ but, things WILL get done.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Nov 2018, 12:59

He has/will spread the pine chips for me, the remaining 8 cubic metres should be delivered and spread Monday. Can get him to do some spraying: give him a key to the garden shed, have the mix detailed (blow up to A3 size, have it laminated, leave in the shed.) Won’t have the compost tea but the neem oil, insecticidal soap (pure liquid soap (not detergent etc)) and fish hydrolase and liquid kelp will be there. Will have a tin of grease, grease the weedmat I will wrap around the trunks to deter rabbits and hopefully possums.

Will water around the planting hole with the compost tea, fish hydrolase and kelp after planting, plain water to water the actual tree—encourage the roots to venture out the planting hole.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 16 Nov 2018, 10:23

Wow - the 'slasher guy' or a local gardener sounds cheap .........

And he has not even quoted.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Nov 2018, 09:23

Yeah. $500 to put me and my car on the ferry, two tanks of petrol each way to and from Melbourne, $85/night B&B accommodation etc. Plus cost of whatever I need to buy for the garden, food for me and dog etc. Arranging someone to look after Mum—and that has occasioned huge emotional drama for which I will find it hard to forgive my sister.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 16 Nov 2018, 08:29

HBS Guy wrote:Yup, been a journey. The cider apples have been fixed for a while apart from swapping the position of the Improved Foxwhelp and Sweet Coppin to keep the very bittersharp Foxwhelp separate from the bittersharp Breakwell’s Seedling apples.

Reading just how bloody BIG trees on semi dwarfing rootstock can grow threw a spanner in the works! But bending and summer pruning should keep things under control. VERY bad info re tree size on the nursery website!

Thinking of adding another bittersharp or two. No hurry for anymore trees. Will be flat out planting 16 trees in April. Might fly in December next year, keep an eye on the trees, do some summer pruning and do some foliar and soil spraying, check irrigation system etc. Maybe another long visit in April 2020 when can prepare some more planting sites and order trees to plant April 2021. By then I might be living in Tasmania even if not yet in my house. In fact, could pay someone, the guy that slashes my block say, to plant trees for me. He will probably stuff up a bit here and there but this long distance gardening is the pits!


' ........ could pay someone, the guy that slashes my block say, to plant trees for me ....... '

HHmmm, that idea certainly merits some consideration.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Nov 2018, 08:26

Yup, been a journey. The cider apples have been fixed for a while apart from swapping the position of the Improved Foxwhelp and Sweet Coppin to keep the very bittersharp Foxwhelp separate from the bittersharp Breakwell’s Seedling apples.

Reading just how bloody BIG trees on semi dwarfing rootstock can grow threw a spanner in the works! But bending and summer pruning should keep things under control. VERY bad info re tree size on the nursery website!

Thinking of adding another bittersharp or two. No hurry for anymore trees. Will be flat out planting 16 trees in April. Might fly in December next year, keep an eye on the trees, do some summer pruning and do some foliar and soil spraying, check irrigation system etc. Maybe another long visit in April 2020 when can prepare some more planting sites and order trees to plant April 2021. By then I might be living in Tasmania even if not yet in my house. In fact, could pay someone, the guy that slashes my block say, to plant trees for me. He will probably stuff up a bit here and there but this long distance gardening is the pits!

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 16 Nov 2018, 03:59

HBS Guy wrote:Yeah. Was playing around, as you may have read, with two triangles of cherry trees and I did work the geometry out and all that. Decided too much fuss and a simple line fits better than something more fiddly with the pattern of rows and deep ripping done to my block. Easier to net and spray etc as well and will make a great sight when in bloom!

Been thinking about eating apples as well, will get some semi dwarf ones to plant in between the cider apples and a crab apple or two, for fruit (pectin jelly) for cider (tart apples etc) and for cooking (some are good for all three.) Especially a couple late–blossoming apples, help pollinate the late-blooming Brown Snout cider apple etc.

Still got two cider apple trees I no longer want. Use them to try grafting! Another skill to learn! But worry about that a bit later!


good work to try ALL possibilities on paper before touching a spade.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 15 Nov 2018, 21:32

Yeah. Was playing around, as you may have read, with two triangles of cherry trees and I did work the geometry out and all that. Decided too much fuss and a simple line fits better than something more fiddly with the pattern of rows and deep ripping done to my block. Easier to net and spray etc as well and will make a great sight when in bloom!

Been thinking about eating apples as well, will get some semi dwarf ones to plant in between the cider apples and a crab apple or two, for fruit (pectin jelly) for cider (tart apples etc) and for cooking (some are good for all three.) Especially a couple late–blossoming apples, help pollinate the late-blooming Brown Snout cider apple etc.

Still got two cider apple trees I no longer want. Use them to try grafting! Another skill to learn! But worry about that a bit later!

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 15 Nov 2018, 19:58

HBS Guy wrote:OK, after lot of agonising and sketching etc have gone for the simple.

My six cherry trees will go into row 5 planted 765mm apart (30" for those still using those quaint units :bgrin ) Root competition will help keep the trees small. Row 4 and the rest of row 5 will get perry pears.



A 'lot of agonising and sketching' is vital.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 15 Nov 2018, 19:05

OK, after lot of agonising and sketching etc have gone for the simple.

My six cherry trees will go into row 5 planted 765mm apart (30" for those still using those quaint units :bgrin ) Root competition will help keep the trees small. Row 4 and the rest of row 5 will get perry pears.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 15 Nov 2018, 16:58

Been reading “Perry Pears” of which the tree nursery I use stocks three (Gin, Moorcroft and Yellow Huffcap) but there are two more varieties in Australia but, dammit, not in Tasmania: Green Horse (aka Horse Pear(!) White Horse, White Longland. . .) and Red Longdon.

Pears have a non-fermentable sugar called sorbitol (weird, sugar names end in -ose, sucrose, glucose etc. -ol is the ending for an alcohol but it is perry pears we are talking about so, just accept it. So perries a trifle sweeter and more full bodied than ciders.

One other thing about sorbitol: it is a mild laxative. Some perry pears are called {something} Lightning, in and out like lightning. Others must have a lot of sugar that turns into alcohol: Merrylegs and Muddlehead :rofl

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