Gardening

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Expand view Topic review: Gardening

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 22:43

johnsmith wrote:
Aussie wrote:Which is the quince tree?


the forbidden fruit from the garden of eden

If Adam or Eve were silly enough to bite into a raw quince they’d have eaten none of it. Raw quince produces a very nasty prickly sensation in the mouth which lingers for hours. Truly horrible.

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 22:41

Aussie wrote:Excuse this Cane Toad. Which is the quince tree?

:?

Top right with the white blossoms.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 20 Oct 2018, 21:52

Can’t eat a quince raw!

Going to buy another note book and will write that recipe down. Also sloe gin.

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 20 Oct 2018, 21:10

Aussie wrote:Which is the quince tree?


the forbidden fruit from the garden of eden

Re: Gardening

Post by Aussie » 20 Oct 2018, 21:00

Excuse this Cane Toad. Which is the quince tree?

:?

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 20:39

HBS Guy wrote:170 years old! Has to be a seedling with that longevity.

So you do some fermenting and distilling?

No, no fermenting or distilling here but I have dabbled in the past when working for a wine maker in Victoria as his cellar door chef. Made as attempt at my own beer once but it was a disaster.
The tree may be a seeding for all I know. Seven years ago a seedling grew up underneath is. Gave it to friends up the road who are now harvesting fruit identical to the mother tree.
It blew down in a storm 14 years ago. The tree surgeon I consulted told me it wouldn’t survive and to remove it. So I planted another but never got around to removing the old one as it’s gone on producing bumper crops every year since.
The quince liqueur recipe I use is medieval in origin. The quinces are grated into a stainless steel containers, covered and place in cool dark place for four days. The come out looking like something a cow left behind in the paddock. This is then squeezed by hand through multiple layers of muslin to extract the juice which even at this stage tastes wonderful. An equal quantity of vodka is added (some add brandy or bourbon but I reckon these ruin the final product). Raw sugar, a small amount of clove and cinnamon is added and shaken to dissolve then returned in large glass bottles to a dark, cool place for four months. My impression is the alcohol content increases during this last stage but I’m told that’s not possible. Whatever, the result is delicious rocket fuel.

[url][URL=http://s185.photobucket.com/user/pickleberry_photos/media/DSCF3816_zpsiw9zjgpg.jpg.html]Image[/url]

Image[/url]

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 20 Oct 2018, 08:10

170 years old! Has to be a seedling with that longevity.

So you do some fermenting and distilling?

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 07:31

HBS Guy wrote:How long is a piece of string?

Bittersweets Yarlington Mill, Blanchette are good.

- - - - - -etc

Fascinating but I won’t be planting any fruit trees again. I’ve gotten too old and too decrepit to keep up the small garden I have and will soon be forced to sell up. Most of all I’ll miss the 170 year old quince tree from which I make quince liqueur. Delicious and rocket fuel.
[url][URL=http://s185.photobucket.com/user/pickleberry_photos/media/DSCF4533_zpsqgrerrtz.jpg.html]Image[/url][/url]

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 20 Oct 2018, 05:38

How long is a piece of string?

Bittersweets Yarlington Mill, Blanchette are good.

Bittersharps: Breakwell’s Seedling,

Sharps: King David but can use crab apples, Granny Smiths etc


Bittersweets: provide tannins that give mouthfeel and bitterness and add a lot of fermentable sugars

Bittersharps: more acidity, less sugar

Sharps: acidity

There are sweet cider apples but not used to make a cider but rather to dilute a too–bitter or too-acid cider.

The King Davids sound good for making juice: vinous or nearly so (depends on who is talking) a cross between Jonathan and Winesap or Jonathan and Arkansas Black.

I have a bittersharp Breakwell’s Seedling, a very bittersharp bittersharp in improved Foxwelp, a Sweet in Sweet Coppin and (will have 4) bittersweet Yarlington Mills and 2 Blanchette, 2 sharps in King David and another bittersweet maturing late in Brown Snout.

If you want to make some cider can I suggest perry instead? Perry is a finer drink than cider and the trees are dwarf so you can espalier them. https://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au/23-perry-pears have three bit ignore the Moorcroft—you get to it too late and it is rotten on the inside, the other two will pollinate each other. Do some searching (here and the www) might find another one.

Beurre Bosc is a perry as well as eating pear, puts a nice pear taste in the perry.

I won’t plant the perry pears until I live on my block—espaliers need pruning to keep the trees two dimensional.

I plan on growing a LOT of raspberries: love them and they freeze well, preserve well etc. Will plant a crab apple, helps to pollinate my cider apples and provide juice to make pectin jelly for jam making.

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 05:22

HBS Guy wrote:No poppies springing up on my block (can hardly call it a garden as yet) but April I will plant 10 cider apple trees and 6 cherry trees.

What varieties make good cider apple trees?’
Hey mate, time you changed your signature. The mad monk has no chance of taking control now.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 20 Oct 2018, 05:19

No poppies springing up on my block (can hardly call it a garden as yet) but April I will plant 10 cider apple trees and 6 cherry trees.

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 20 Oct 2018, 05:16

HBS Guy wrote:My Tassie block has alkaline clay soil.

I’m told by local farmers the soil here is a complex mixture ideal for growing opium popies due to the high amount of molybdenum in the soil. They’ll pull your leg though if you try to pick their brains about their money crop which incidentally has a habit of popping up in my garden and along the roadsides every spring. Junkies who pass through Tasmania sometimes make the mistake of pinching them. Problem is there are two varieties, one bred for opium, the other for thebane, an anaesthetic. Get the wrong one and it will kill you.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 20 Oct 2018, 02:45

My Tassie block has alkaline clay soil.

Re: Gardening

Post by dissilymordentroge » 19 Oct 2018, 21:54

HBS Guy wrote:Is parsley the one where the seeds lose viability quickly? Is your soil the right pH? My slightly alkaline soil grows huge parsley plants. Try adding a little dolomite.

That helps but here in Nth Tasmania in my garden it’s rampant like a weed, dolomite or not.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 17 Oct 2018, 19:14

Yeah, then find someone with a dingo to roughly distribute the gravel in the trenches, I can do the final spreading of gravel.

Might be able to visit the Salamanca markets this next trip!

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 17 Oct 2018, 18:44

HBS Guy wrote:At last! Got a message from the tractor guy, he got my email but forgot.

Hope he can do the work, will make next April a lot easier!


Good news.

Yes, the more he can do with his tractor the better.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 16 Oct 2018, 17:39

At last! Got a message from the tractor guy, he got my email but forgot.

Hope he can do the work, will make next April a lot easier!

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 14 Oct 2018, 18:43

4" is just the depth of the bags of soil (i said 4 but upon reflection it's closer to 10. Two concrete sleepers deep and they're 150 mm wide each). Then under that is more soil. By the time it gets to that depth the tomatoes will be established.

We'll see how we go this year, if it doesn't work then next year I'll go deeper. I've had success in the past in pots that were about the same depth so I didn't think i had to go deeper.

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 14 Oct 2018, 17:49

4" deep???

Try 40" deep!

Tomato seedlings: trim off all “branches” and plant it with just the tip showing: all that stem will send out roots, meaning your plant gets more water/nutrients!

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 14 Oct 2018, 17:39

Aussie wrote:
.....but wifey dearest likes her palms (cause she never has to deal with the mess).


I hate palm trees. Not one within cooey of where we are now. Fuck palm trees. Dirty bloody things drop shit everywhere.



you and me both. They're ore trouble than they are worth

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 14 Oct 2018, 17:39

HBS Guy wrote:You NEED to take your soil pH. That is bedrock stuff. Buy a kit, buy a cheap pH meter buy both. If it is acid (pH under 7) you need lime, if it is alkaline (pH > 7) no lime, use gypsum. Spread some potassium sulphate, more if you have alkaline soil.

Dig in lots of organic matter, compost and cow or sheep poop. Spread mulch to stop the sun baking your soil. Gardening 101.



I filled my garden bed with bags of soil specifically for tomatoes and vege's. Bed is about 4 inches deep, with plenty of drainage since it sits atop a retaining wall.

Image

Re: Gardening

Post by Aussie » 14 Oct 2018, 17:34

.....but wifey dearest likes her palms (cause she never has to deal with the mess).


I hate palm trees. Not one within cooey of where we are now. Fuck palm trees. Dirty bloody things drop shit everywhere.

Re: Gardening

Post by johnsmith » 14 Oct 2018, 17:33

Sprintcyclist wrote:
johnsmith wrote:With trees I'm going to put in peach, nectarines and figs.

I'm just waiting for wifey dearest to find a job, then while she's at work, out will come my chainsaw to make some room.
By the time she gets home it'll be to late :gsp

that might not lead to matrimonial harmony or the best end result for your garden


we had made a deal shortly after moving here that she could keep her tree's if she cleaned up the mess and raked the yard .... a few days later she hurt her back so was unable to keep up her end of the bargain. Her back is fine now and has been for a few weeks, but she still has never pick up a palm frond and I doubt she knows what the garden rake looks like. Should she complain, I'll remind her of the deal and buy her some flowers ...she'll get over it pretty quickly :bgrin

Re: Gardening

Post by HBS Guy » 14 Oct 2018, 16:59

You NEED to take your soil pH. That is bedrock stuff. Buy a kit, buy a cheap pH meter buy both. If it is acid (pH under 7) you need lime, if it is alkaline (pH > 7) no lime, use gypsum. Spread some potassium sulphate, more if you have alkaline soil.

Dig in lots of organic matter, compost and cow or sheep poop. Spread mulch to stop the sun baking your soil. Gardening 101.

Re: Gardening

Post by Sprintcyclist » 14 Oct 2018, 16:53

johnsmith wrote:With trees I'm going to put in peach, nectarines and figs.

I'm just waiting for wifey dearest to find a job, then while she's at work, out will come my chainsaw to make some room.
By the time she gets home it'll be to late :gsp


that might not lead to matrimonial harmony or the best end result for your garden

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