The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

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Expand view Topic review: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by Dax » 21 Apr 2018, 12:46

pinkeye wrote:
Dax wrote:There's always been a gender gap, that's evolution in action and the one today, is no different to the past. It's like most things in life, everyone thinks they have discovered something new for humanity, when it's just a repeat of the past. All that's different is the living conditions, educational standards and technology.

When you look around and find 95% of the young are locked to their phones and even older people, especially women are locked to them no wonder some are thinking the gender gap is new.


Sorry to interrupt those adorable family stories.....but I'm feeling devilish tonight. :bgrin

DAX.... no-one else has seen fit to advise you, so I will. This isn't about the GENDER GAP.

:bgrin


My post is about the generation gap, just a mis spelt word and that's clearly obvious.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by Auggie » 21 Apr 2018, 12:36

johnsmith wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:
mothra wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:Interesting points of view. I wonder though if the new generation are becoming more and more insular due to their comfort. They haven’t struggled like the older generations have, and this may be creating values and beliefs which may not be helpful for them.

For example, I think that we should be instilling order, discipline, respect for the elderly and responsibility in our children. Many young people have a bad attitude to life and that comes from a sense of entitlement, I think.

I look at my grandparents who have been married for more than 70 years and still going strong. How can I not respect nor admire that?? It wasn’t only love that kept them together together but an overwhelming sense of ‘commitment’ - something we’ve lost today.




"The children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise."

~ Socrates


So, I guess it comes down to a matter to the generation and the values and beliefs of the preceding generation. It’s all relative, I suppose.


most people remember the good stuff, and forget the crappy stuff.... when a 70 yr old reminisces about his life as a youngster they often glorify it

also, you might not see yourself in the same light as for example the old man next door (imagine someone like Herb). You see yourself and a nice respectful kid who likes to muck around occasionally, he might see you as the pain in the arse kid always making noise on your bike or scooter, from next door.


If I rode a bike or scooter yes.

But I know what you’re saying.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by johnsmith » 21 Apr 2018, 12:29

CaesarAugustus wrote:
mothra wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:Interesting points of view. I wonder though if the new generation are becoming more and more insular due to their comfort. They haven’t struggled like the older generations have, and this may be creating values and beliefs which may not be helpful for them.

For example, I think that we should be instilling order, discipline, respect for the elderly and responsibility in our children. Many young people have a bad attitude to life and that comes from a sense of entitlement, I think.

I look at my grandparents who have been married for more than 70 years and still going strong. How can I not respect nor admire that?? It wasn’t only love that kept them together together but an overwhelming sense of ‘commitment’ - something we’ve lost today.




"The children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise."

~ Socrates


So, I guess it comes down to a matter to the generation and the values and beliefs of the preceding generation. It’s all relative, I suppose.


most people remember the good stuff, and forget the crappy stuff.... when a 70 yr old reminisces about his life as a youngster they often glorify it

also, you might not see yourself in the same light as for example the old man next door (imagine someone like Herb). You see yourself and a nice respectful kid who likes to muck around occasionally, he might see you as the pain in the arse kid always making noise on your bike or scooter, from next door.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by Auggie » 21 Apr 2018, 12:17

mothra wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:Interesting points of view. I wonder though if the new generation are becoming more and more insular due to their comfort. They haven’t struggled like the older generations have, and this may be creating values and beliefs which may not be helpful for them.

For example, I think that we should be instilling order, discipline, respect for the elderly and responsibility in our children. Many young people have a bad attitude to life and that comes from a sense of entitlement, I think.

I look at my grandparents who have been married for more than 70 years and still going strong. How can I not respect nor admire that?? It wasn’t only love that kept them together together but an overwhelming sense of ‘commitment’ - something we’ve lost today.




"The children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise."

~ Socrates


So, I guess it comes down to a matter to the generation and the values and beliefs of the preceding generation. It’s all relative, I suppose.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by johnsmith » 21 Apr 2018, 11:22

mothra wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:Bet she knows every little detail about you. That's what she's really grinning at ..;)


and still she loves me ...

she is pretty cool for an old bird though ...and she makes a great creme caramel


Well her daughter must be making some acceptable reports. Well done you.


her daughter loves me too

aren't I lucky. I managed to fool two of them. :c :c :c


Ha! Like you can get past the kind of woman who'd put goats on a plane for her daughter!

Fess up, you're alright, aren't you.


i keep telling wifey dearest how lucky she is to have landed me ... :bgrin :bgrin :bgrin

although I'm not sure how to take it when she rolls her eyes after I say that to her :b :b :b

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by mothra » 21 Apr 2018, 10:37

johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:Bet she knows every little detail about you. That's what she's really grinning at ..;)


and still she loves me ...

she is pretty cool for an old bird though ...and she makes a great creme caramel


Well her daughter must be making some acceptable reports. Well done you.


her daughter loves me too

aren't I lucky. I managed to fool two of them. :c :c :c


Ha! Like you can get past the kind of woman who'd put goats on a plane for her daughter!

Fess up, you're alright, aren't you.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by johnsmith » 21 Apr 2018, 10:29

mothra wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:Bet she knows every little detail about you. That's what she's really grinning at ..;)


and still she loves me ...

she is pretty cool for an old bird though ...and she makes a great creme caramel


Well her daughter must be making some acceptable reports. Well done you.


her daughter loves me too

aren't I lucky. I managed to fool two of them. :c :c :c

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by mothra » 21 Apr 2018, 10:22

johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:Bet she knows every little detail about you. That's what she's really grinning at ..;)


and still she loves me ...

she is pretty cool for an old bird though ...and she makes a great creme caramel


Well her daughter must be making some acceptable reports. Well done you.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by johnsmith » 21 Apr 2018, 09:29

mothra wrote:Bet she knows every little detail about you. That's what she's really grinning at ..;)


and still she loves me ...

she is pretty cool for an old bird though ...and she makes a great creme caramel

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by mothra » 21 Apr 2018, 09:24

johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:Love that she thought it through and decided on the goats.


she thought I was dead serious ...

when she did finally make it over for the wedding, I drove her to a goat farm to get her to pick one ....

she hit me :rofl :rofl :rofl :rofl


I love your mother-in-law. :rofl



she's awesome ... I don't understand a word she says and she hasn't got a clue what I'm saying .... we just grin at each other and nod. Fantastic :rofl :rofl



Bet she knows every little detail about you. That's what she's really grinning at ..;)

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by johnsmith » 21 Apr 2018, 09:21

mothra wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:Love that she thought it through and decided on the goats.


she thought I was dead serious ...

when she did finally make it over for the wedding, I drove her to a goat farm to get her to pick one ....

she hit me :rofl :rofl :rofl :rofl


I love your mother-in-law. :rofl



she's awesome ... I don't understand a word she says and she hasn't got a clue what I'm saying .... we just grin at each other and nod. Fantastic :rofl :rofl

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by mothra » 21 Apr 2018, 09:20

johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:Love that she thought it through and decided on the goats.


she thought I was dead serious ...

when she did finally make it over for the wedding, I drove her to a goat farm to get her to pick one ....

she hit me :rofl :rofl :rofl :rofl


I love your mother-in-law. :rofl

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by johnsmith » 21 Apr 2018, 09:18

mothra wrote:Love that she thought it through and decided on the goats.


she thought I was dead serious ...

when she did finally make it over for the wedding, I drove her to a goat farm to get her to pick one ....

she hit me :rofl :rofl :rofl :rofl

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by pinkeye » 21 Apr 2018, 01:08

mothra wrote:
pinkeye wrote::yak yak :jump

yeah, and they end up with crazy sons.

Sigh.


Ooooh yes. Very troubled little princes. Usually with major entitlement issues.


Yep. Pity the poor women who try to deal with the pricks.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by mothra » 21 Apr 2018, 00:59

pinkeye wrote::yak yak :jump

yeah, and they end up with crazy sons.

Sigh.


Ooooh yes. Very troubled little princes. Usually with major entitlement issues.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by pinkeye » 21 Apr 2018, 00:54

:yak yak :jump

yeah, and they end up with crazy sons.

Sigh.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by mothra » 21 Apr 2018, 00:27

johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:My son got engaged in Woolworths when he three and a half. He just told this about four year old that she was really beautiful and asked her to marry him. She said yes. He was sitting in the trolley and she was on the ground, She just walked over and held his hand. Then they just stayed like that whilst their mothers laughed and organised the ceremony..


:giggle :giggle :giggle they're adorable aren't they!


So precious


johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:I used to tell the little guys in my daughter's junior primary that i wouldn't let them marry her unless they got me a hundred goat and two alpacas. They would run up to me every day and report on how many goats they had.


another story

when my wife was still in Romania (before we married) and we were chatting about our plans for her to come here and marry, her mother walked past and told my wife to ask me what I wanted for a wedding present. I replied that it is customary in Australia for the brides parents to present the groom with either a cow or two goats. ... she then asked my wife if they allow goats on a plane :rofl :rofl :rofl :rofl :rofl


Love that she thought it through and decided on the goats.


johnsmith wrote:
mothra wrote:And i'm well pleased your son has found a sensible woman so young.

he dumped her .... I don't blame him, while she's a sweetheart his future mother-in-law is a battle axe ... just not worth the angst when he has so many other options :giggle :giggle


I have told my friends and daughter, if i behave like one of those bloody women over my son, slap me.

Monster-in-laws can be feral. Some women have really weird ideas about their sons.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by mothra » 21 Apr 2018, 00:21

CaesarAugustus wrote:Interesting points of view. I wonder though if the new generation are becoming more and more insular due to their comfort. They haven’t struggled like the older generations have, and this may be creating values and beliefs which may not be helpful for them.

For example, I think that we should be instilling order, discipline, respect for the elderly and responsibility in our children. Many young people have a bad attitude to life and that comes from a sense of entitlement, I think.

I look at my grandparents who have been married for more than 70 years and still going strong. How can I not respect nor admire that?? It wasn’t only love that kept them together together but an overwhelming sense of ‘commitment’ - something we’ve lost today.




"The children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise."

~ Socrates

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by Auggie » 20 Apr 2018, 23:35

pinkeye wrote:what? :roll

oops.. don't answer that. :bgrin


Do you hate yourself?

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 23:00

what? :roll

oops.. don't answer that. :bgrin

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by Auggie » 20 Apr 2018, 22:50

pinkeye wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:So, are you saying that today’s generation are just as disciplined, and as are committed in their relationships as the Nonni?


many nonna and nonno's didn't stay married because of any commitment, they stayed married because they had no other choice. Be it for religious reasons, fear, to avoid being shunned by society or even economics, back then for many women leaving simply wasn't an option.


Sure but those reasons don’t stop people now. There was sth else - a deep sense of commitment, in my view.


those reasons aren't as much of a barrier in our society today (for most of us). Society doesn't give a shit if you've been previously divorced. If someone tells you they're divorced you would barely notice except as a by line. 50 years ago if a woman said she was divorced your reaction would be the same as if someone today told you that they were a convicted murderer. The church has lost it 'control' over people, economically, woman today work in all sorts of jobs with or without children and those that don't work are provided a safety net by the govt. It has little to do with commitment. Back then they simply had no choice.




Go back 50 or 60 yrs to a small italian village and a divorced woman would have been shunned, she would be seen as the town whore. She would be unable to work to support herself or her kids except perhaps as the town whore. It just wasn't possible. Many women were killed because they remained in abusive relationships because there simply was no alternative for them. It was a very different way of life to today.




Jeez, he's done it again. Has he?

No.. I apologise, this does appear to be about a generational gap. But NOT the one upon which the topic revolves.

Suit yourselves, it's a free world. :roll


You’ll get over it.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by Auggie » 20 Apr 2018, 22:48

johnsmith wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:@John Smith.

Just out of curiousity, which region of Italy are you from?


I was born in Oz, my parents are from Calabria.

you?


Ah, Calabria. We joke that Calabrians are Greeks.

Campania.


Calabrians are a bit of this and a little of that .... greek, arab, norman, carthaginians .... we've been conquered by all at some stage ...

it's not like campagnia was any different. :roll


Yeah but we’ve got Naples.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 22:32

johnsmith wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:So, are you saying that today’s generation are just as disciplined, and as are committed in their relationships as the Nonni?


many nonna and nonno's didn't stay married because of any commitment, they stayed married because they had no other choice. Be it for religious reasons, fear, to avoid being shunned by society or even economics, back then for many women leaving simply wasn't an option.


Sure but those reasons don’t stop people now. There was sth else - a deep sense of commitment, in my view.


those reasons aren't as much of a barrier in our society today (for most of us). Society doesn't give a shit if you've been previously divorced. If someone tells you they're divorced you would barely notice except as a by line. 50 years ago if a woman said she was divorced your reaction would be the same as if someone today told you that they were a convicted murderer. The church has lost it 'control' over people, economically, woman today work in all sorts of jobs with or without children and those that don't work are provided a safety net by the govt. It has little to do with commitment. Back then they simply had no choice.




Go back 50 or 60 yrs to a small italian village and a divorced woman would have been shunned, she would be seen as the town whore. She would be unable to work to support herself or her kids except perhaps as the town whore. It just wasn't possible. Many women were killed because they remained in abusive relationships because there simply was no alternative for them. It was a very different way of life to today.




Jeez, he's done it again. Has he?

No.. I apologise, this does appear to be about a generational gap. But NOT the one upon which the topic revolves.

Suit yourselves, it's a free world. :roll

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by johnsmith » 20 Apr 2018, 22:28

CaesarAugustus wrote:
johnsmith wrote:
CaesarAugustus wrote:So, are you saying that today’s generation are just as disciplined, and as are committed in their relationships as the Nonni?


many nonna and nonno's didn't stay married because of any commitment, they stayed married because they had no other choice. Be it for religious reasons, fear, to avoid being shunned by society or even economics, back then for many women leaving simply wasn't an option.


Sure but those reasons don’t stop people now. There was sth else - a deep sense of commitment, in my view.


those reasons aren't as much of a barrier in our society today (for most of us). Society doesn't give a shit if you've been previously divorced. If someone tells you they're divorced you would barely notice except as a by line. 50 years ago if a woman said she was divorced your reaction would be the same as if someone today told you that they were a convicted murderer. The church has lost it 'control' over people, economically, woman today work in all sorts of jobs with or without children and those that don't work are provided a safety net by the govt. It has little to do with commitment. Back then they simply had no choice.

Go back 50 or 60 yrs to a small italian village and a divorced woman would have been shunned, she would be seen as the town whore. She would be unable to work to support herself or her kids except perhaps as the town whore. It just wasn't possible. Many women were killed because they remained in abusive relationships because there simply was no alternative for them. It was a very different way of life to today.

Re: The generation gap is back – but not as we know it

Post by pinkeye » 20 Apr 2018, 22:27

Dax wrote:There's always been a gender gap, that's evolution in action and the one today, is no different to the past. It's like most things in life, everyone thinks they have discovered something new for humanity, when it's just a repeat of the past. All that's different is the living conditions, educational standards and technology.

When you look around and find 95% of the young are locked to their phones and even older people, especially women are locked to them no wonder some are thinking the gender gap is new.


Sorry to interrupt those adorable family stories.....but I'm feeling devilish tonight. :bgrin

DAX.... no-one else has seen fit to advise you, so I will. This isn't about the GENDER GAP.

:bgrin

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