Who wants to NOT be a millionaire quiz!

MilesAway

Bongalong
Researchers have identified 8 blood types in horses: A, C, D, K, P, Q, U, and T. Groups A, C, and Q are considered the most important

Wow and pigs only have 2... what a fun world

ohh and miles stop horsing around....
NAYYY .....
Oh argue if you like. Possibly some dogs, especially labradors, are “born gentle” but even so a wise parent prepares for the arrival of the first baby and keeps an eye on them. Dogs are dogs, not people after all. I think anyone is richer for having a dog. A pitbull reared and trained properly would also be an excellent guardian for a baby.

There was a case of a labrador picking up a toddler and throwing it some distance—the mother thought the toddler was dead. She wasn’t but could have been had the lab not got her out of the way of the brown snake slithering from under the house. Dog killed the snake but was bitten—was kept alive with antivenom. Brown snakes here are pretty deadly.
Apparently it's only eastern browns that are deadly.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
A Serbian astronomer Milankovitch plotted the orbit and inclination of the earth. The major ice ages fitted what he calculated from observations. The Milankovitch cycle plots the insolation or amount of sunlight hitting north of 60°N. When the earths orbit is most elliptic the axis of rotation points away from the sun.

Currently the Milankovitch cycle is plunging down yet as DRAH and myself have tracked this NH summer (and fall!) the Arctic is unusually warm!

Temp change last 8000yrs inck Milankovitch Cycle.jpeg
You see the insolation north of 60°N starts dropping at about 5000BC, round about 3000BC temperatures start dropping yet as human civilisation and urbanisation proceed the temperature drop slows more and more. We get to the coldest part of the Holocene (at least for the Atlantic coasts) in the LIA when the Industrial Revolution roars into life and CO2 and temperatures both zoom. Intensive agriculture means deforestation, destroying CO2 sinks, lot of timber would be burned releasing their stored carbon into the air as CO2 etc etc.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
My question again?

When you boil fruit to make jam, what sets the jam? What is the traditional test for set point?
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
My question again?

When you boil fruit to make jam, what sets the jam? What is the traditional test for set point?
Plectin!??!

I'm not sure what the test is but I'll guess seeing if a skewer can stand straight in it?

No, not much of a jam fan but my uncle from Queensland made some once from I think maybe a rose: he made a miracle because I almost drank the blooming stuff!

🤾
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
A Serbian astronomer Milankovitch plotted the orbit and inclination of the earth. The major ice ages fitted what he calculated from observations. The Milankovitch cycle plots the insolation or amount of sunlight hitting north of 60°N. When the earths orbit is most elliptic the axis of rotation points away from the sun.

Currently the Milankovitch cycle is plunging down yet as DRAH and myself have tracked this NH summer (and fall!) the Arctic is unusually warm!

View attachment 373
You see the insolation north of 60°N starts dropping at about 5000BC, round about 3000BC temperatures start dropping yet as human civilisation and urbanisation proceed the temperature drop slows more and more. We get to the coldest part of the Holocene (at least for the Atlantic coasts) in the LIA when the Industrial Revolution roars into life and CO2 and temperatures both zoom. Intensive agriculture means deforestation, destroying CO2 sinks, lot of timber would be burned releasing their stored carbon into the air as CO2 etc etc.
Awesomely saucy graph btw Mr Monk🤾🍿🍿🍿🍿🍿🍿🍿🍿🍿🍔🤸
 
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HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Yes, pectin sets the jam. To test for set point you put three saucers (ceramic not plastic) in the fridge when you start the boil of the fruit and sugar. When you think the jam has reached the set point get one of the saucers out the fridge, plop a small amount of the jam on it, then push a spoon into the blob: if it wrinkles you have set point. My first batch of seville orange marmalade I KNEW was set—it formed many sharp ripples. Made enough to last me 2 years—SO marmalade is the only jam you can keep for up to 2 years.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Deelish! Well made you have thin strips of peel in a wonderfully clear jelly. A grown up taste, bitter but delightful, wondrous citrous notes. Well, to me.

Some people do not have grown up tastes, still have the taste of a child. Such poor people can never enjoy marmalade or beer, two of God’s gifts to suffering mankind.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
Yes, pectin sets the jam. To test for set point you put three saucers (ceramic not plastic) in the fridge when you start the boil of the fruit and sugar. When you think the jam has reached the set point get one of the saucers out the fridge, plop a small amount of the jam on it, then push a spoon into the blob: if it wrinkles you have set point. My first batch of seville orange marmalade I KNEW was set—it formed many sharp ripples. Made enough to last me 2 years—SO marmalade is the only jam you can keep for up to 2 years.
Gawd I've got Jams in my fridge that are at least that old. Sigh...
 
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