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Who wants to NOT be a millionaire quiz!

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
More than that Seth.

One more clue:

First Battle of Manassas or First Battle of Bull Run—Manassas was the Confederate term, Bull Run (creek) the Union term. Quite a few Civil War battles have two names like that.

Skedaddle a very American term.
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
That’s sad, no guts and glory or a good days innings... just over before he started!
Yeh, well I was pretty sad when my Dad told me: I can only imagine he was a little bit sadder...

We were doing the family tree... He was Irish and blah blah blah,.. first day, lol :wins ..... :doh:doh:doh:doh:doh
 
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Lols

Active member
@MilesAway fascinating insight into how it was, via family tree/ancestry.
I have been doing ancestry now for 5 years and have found so many sad tales of young deaths.
One such 4th great grandmother, died during childbirth at age 27, she had a girl, and already had 3 boys.
I think back in Italy, with them homebirths, stuff happened like that more so....then all the aunts and uncles and grandparents
step in to look after family. But that baby girl grew up okay, got married and had 3 kids herself, so she was a 3rd great grandmother.
Amazing how it goes down the line like that...imagine if that baby died at childbirth instead, then I may not have been invented :poketongue
 

Lols

Active member
My Dad was just amazed at the poverty involved... some made it rich but not most.

Lots of luck, for sure.
It seems poverty was the norm back in the times. Very few were well off except royalty etc. but how frugal and tough they were to survive for us to be here today.
They ate nothing fancy or rich, they were skinny, so there was no diabetes, or cholesterol or heart problems like the rich had.
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
It seems poverty was the norm back in the times. Very few were well off except royalty etc. but how frugal and tough they were to survive for us to be here today.
They ate nothing fancy or rich, they were skinny, so there was no diabetes, or cholesterol or heart problems like the rich had.
Yeh, bigger families so businesses ventures could be entertained by a family who coordinated well. It comes down to a lot of luck of course but a driven mother and father could eat fairly well and own their house etc... Maybe not privately school their whole family but develop a good work ethic in all their children.
I was brought up fairly decently and always heard straight from my grandparents mouths how that seemed to be the exact pattern over generations: respect for your elders and things seem to fall into place because you gain the respect of your family and so get helped by them.

Although I must say I almost flipped when my nan told me her dad died in his 50s from a heart attack because he used to have a beer before work everyday on the farm. Oh well, he looked well dressed and apparently he was a top bloke so they worked hard and had their fun while at it. Once again work ethic was established on both sides of the family...
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
The Great Skedaddle was the union forces panicking and fleeing headlong all the way to Washington.

Lifted morale in the South, made the North think realistically about the war. Civilans incl ladies had driven over the Potomac to see the South get beat, they were tangled up in the Great Skedaddle. William T Sherman was there, a Colonel in charge of a brigade, did pretty well but had to leave when his regiments did.

While the North had success in the west (Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi etc) in the East they had little luck—maybe because in the west it was smaller campaigns (up until Shiloh) and figures like Grant and Sherman learned lessons leading brigades and divisions in smaller battles.


Will ask another question a bit later.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Hmmmmm I could ask: the Rheinheidsgebot (Purity law) dictates that beer must only be brewed from what Ingredients. But I will be merciful.

What is the name of the poem that includes the line “Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink?”
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
Hmmmmm I could ask: the Rheinheidsgebot (Purity law) dictates that beer must only be brewed from what Ingredients. But I will be merciful.

What is the name of the poem that includes the line “Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink?”
Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner.
 

DonDeeHippy

Active member
I am sure they did another version .. most likely the same album as the Fool on a Hill or possibly a Greatest Hits of Sergio M... ?

This must be an earlier version.

Beautiful though.. just people and instruments.. voices ..

sorry for the revisit...

It just isn't the same as my memory recalls. Perhaps this should be on The Song Remains the Same..?

OH yeah MONK.. your turn.. No-one knows all that much about the American Civil War.
The Americans had a civil WAR !!!!!! when did this happen ??????
 

DonDeeHippy

Active member
Hmmmmm I could ask: the Rheinheidsgebot (Purity law) dictates that beer must only be brewed from what Ingredients. But I will be merciful.

What is the name of the poem that includes the line “Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink?”
I once had a Bride that would only go out with the Tide ?
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
Yeh, that's the "Resplendant Quetzal": official symbol of Guatemala I think, and maybe even its currency.... They are also in Mexico... Yes, the smallest/lightest(!?) foot bones of all birds or something...(perhaps ratio wise !?) [3 subspecies perhaps...]

It is supposed to represent the Aztec feathered serpent "Quetzalcoatl"... coatl means serpent... Quetzal mean feathered or plumed, or perhaps even precious feathered ... not quite sure but coatl means serpent anyway!!

The equivalent feathered serpent in Mayan culture is "Kukulkan"- the famous snake pyramid in Chichen Itza is the temple of Kukulkan tho there is another step pyramid for Quetzalcoatl but is not in as well preserved condition..
 
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