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What are you reading?

Roxanna

New member
I did think of posting this at the “original PA”, but I like it better here. What sort of stuff do you like to read? I love historical fiction, crime, and nonfiction stuff like Bill Bryson.

At present I’m rereading the Phil Rickman Merrily Watkins series. I love his writing. That’s what put me on to Nick Drake’s music.

What do you like?
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
I just finished reading "The Escape Artists", by Neal Bascomb.

It is the story of captured WW1 pilots' many attempts to escape. Many attempts failed. But not all. It is the story of what led up to the single biggest escape of the war.

It was fascinating. Over 300 pages in paperback, the story keeps the reader turning the pages and reading on. Exciting story of hardship, perseverance, great risk, failure, and success.

This is non-fiction. It is a true account of what happened. I highly recommend this book. Extremely well-researched.

Seth
 

jovialmo

Administrator
Staff member
I like Science Fiction and bought a collection of Philip K Dick short stories at an op shop and am reading that.

I like historical stuff, non-fiction or semi-fiction too. Dickins, Kipling.

Oh—if I want a little magic I turn not to dreck like harry Potter but to Wind in the Willows, especially where Otter’s missing youngster is found by Rat and Mole resting at the feet of Pan.
 

DonDeeHippy

Active member
I'm reading John Birmingham at the moment he wrote "He died with a felafel in his hand" a great aussie writer, he now does Science fiction stories that are amazing,
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
Dark Emu
by Bruce Pascoe

I'm waiting to get it back from the local library.

I only got to part way through the first Chapter-Agriculture, before I realised I had to give it back.

I'm waiting to get it back.

That far?? it breaks my heart already.

The Prologue set the scene brilliantly.
 

DonDeeHippy

Active member
My wonderful Partner got me this book, couldn't wait for my birthday and gave it to me on the weekend.. Funny awesome book
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
I am currently reading..

Court of Killers
by William Bernhardt.

It's about the Last Chance Lawyers.
 

Chuck

Active member
Has anyone read the book that I’ve ordered called 'Balcony Over Jerusalem'?

It sounds rather controversial about the ME and especially Israel!
It is written by an Australian ME correspondent.

I have visited Israel and and wasn’t impressed with their attitudes towards our treatment and people under their control.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
I'm reading a debut novel by someone called Mark Oldfield.
Called the Sentinel.. it has it's roots in the Spanish Civil War, and later a forensic investigator in 2009.

My last library book.

Soon I'll have to dip in to my own books...
 

jovialmo

Administrator
Staff member
Have read Ulysses S Grant’s memoirs and a history of the American Civil War.

The English generals of WWI were war criminals! The lessons of the Civil war should have shown them that sending troops to attack entrenched enemy troops was murder plain and simple! (E.g. Cold Harbor and Kennesaw Mountain, Battle of Gettysburg and especially Pickett’s Charge.) They also repeated the Battle of Fort Pillow aka the Battle of the Crater! Imbeciles!
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
The Anzacs were decimated due to poor leadership. The Brits just thought they were cannon fodder. :sad
 

jovialmo

Administrator
Staff member
Interesting, may go look at that once the update is done and a couple other things are finalised.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
I just finished The Moscow Rules. It was fascinating and fast paced. I was actually sorry that it ended, wishing these stories could go on and on.

It reads like a spy novel, but it is all non-fiction.

If you like a book that gets your attention early and holds it to the last page, you’ll enjoy this book.
 

jovialmo

Administrator
Staff member
I am reading Sherman’s Memoirs having just finished those of US Grant—is Grant the origin of the expression “Uncle Sam?”

Sherman, while still in the military found that the yellow rocks two people brought to him were indeed gold, starting the California gold rush. I had said both were failures in civil life between resigning from the Army and rejoining it on the outbreak of the Civil War.

That was too harsh. Grant did fail at farming—due to extreme weather. He manumitted the slave he had bought to help on the farm tho he could have done with the money from selling him. Sherman went to work for a branch of a bank in San Francisco: when all the other banks succumbed to a run on the banks Sherman made sure the bank he worked in survived the run, not an easy thing to do, the banks never having the money to pay all depositors, the money being loaned out. The branch was later closed by head office rather than failing.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
I finished the book based around the Spanish Civil War.

Now I am reading one of MY OWN books... Library books all finished now.
Hope they open Libraries soon.

It is a paperback by Peter James.. an really excellent British author of Suspenseful surprisingly subtle stories. :bgrin
 

jovialmo

Administrator
Staff member
Peter James the writer setting his stories in the present period? (9/11 featured in one of his books) or is that PD James?
 

Chuck

Active member
SethBullock said:
I just finished The Moscow Rules. It was fascinating and fast paced. I was actually sorry that it ended, wishing these stories could go on and on.

It reads like a spy novel, but it is all non-fiction.

If you like a book that gets your attention early and holds it to the last page, you’ll enjoy this book.
Does it mention anything about Russia being ahead of the US in certain areas of technology?

One of the most interesting article that I’ve read is how Russia used to listen in, to the conversations at the US embassy in Moscow.
To give u a clue, this tech. concept is currently being used everyday by shoppers.

What many young folks think is new technology, generally It is yesteryears concept that was too expensive for businesses to uptake.

Cloud storage is nothing new!

I worked on this concept with electronic engineers In the late 70's.
We couldn’t get the Federal, State govt or banks to store their info on a large central computer located in Sydney.
In those days people didn’t have a PC on there desk but simply a dumb VDU terminal.
 

SethBullock

Moderator
Staff member
Chuck said:
SethBullock said:
I just finished The Moscow Rules. It was fascinating and fast paced. I was actually sorry that it ended, wishing these stories could go on and on.

It reads like a spy novel, but it is all non-fiction.

If you like a book that gets your attention early and holds it to the last page, you’ll enjoy this book.
Does it mention anything about Russia being ahead of the US in certain areas of technology?

One of the most interesting article that I’ve read is how Russia used to listen in, to the conversations at the US embassy in Moscow.
To give u a clue, this tech. concept is currently being used everyday by shoppers.

What many young folks think is new technology, generally It is yesteryears concept that was too expensive for businesses to uptake.

Cloud storage is nothing new!

I worked on this concept with electronic engineers In the late 70's.
We couldn’t get the Federal, State govt or banks to store their info on a large central computer located in Sydney.
In those days people didn’t have a PC on there desk but simply a dumb VDU terminal.
Yes, it does talk about the Russians bugging of the U.S. embassy. The U.S. employed Russian citizens for food preparation, laundry, vehicle maintenance - various services like that. Bugging was a big problem.
 
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