Spencer Repeating Rifle

HBS Guy

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blue horsemen waded dismounted through neck-deep water with their Spencer carbines. “As the rebel bullets began to splash around pretty thick,” recalled a Union officer, northern soldiers discovered that they could pump the waterproof metal cartridges into the Spencer’s chamber underwater; “hence, all along the line you could see the men bring their guns up, let the water run from the muzzle a moment, then take quick aim, fire his piece and pop down again.” The astonished rebels called to each other: “Look at them Yankee sons of bitches, loading their guns under water! What sort of critters be they, anyhow?”2 The pickets surrendered to this submarine assault; Sherman had part of his army across the river on Johnston’s flank by July 9.

Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (Oxford History of the United States Book 6) (p. 752). Oxford University Press. Kindle Edition.
Submarine assault—by infantry :smirk :smirk :smirk
 

HBS Guy

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This history book has a droll authot:

Civilians continued to flee the city; some of those who remained were killed by northern shells that rained down on their streets. “War is war, and not popularity-seeking,” wrote Sherman in pursuance of his career as Georgia’s most unpopular visitor.
 

HBS Guy

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Nothing like a war to speed technological development!

The space program is a more productive way of doing that.
 

HBS Guy

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Same guy, Henri repeating rifle;


That was the one the poor rebs said wtte “They load them on Sunday and shoot them the rest of the week” which was a quiz question by Aussie.

There was another one with an action like a revolver. Two actually, a Colt and a Remington. The Colt:
 
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HBS Guy

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Ta. Fixed.

I think the Henri and Spencer carbines were the main ones used in the Civil War. Some “sharpshooters” actually bought the Henri (IIRC) repeating carbine with their own money.
 

HBS Guy

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A second benefit for the union soldiers—while the Confederates did get their hands on some of these carbines the confederate munitions factories could not make the all-metal cartridges.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
what magnificent machines. I've read heaps where those straight shooting long range guns made a big difference. Henry's were particularly prized, weren't they.?

They are magnificently fit for purpose. Always liked guns. Even as a wee girl child...
 

HBS Guy

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I had a nice. single shot .22rifle. Lovely clean lines, simple action. Sold it when the new gun laws came in, couldn’t be stuffed doing the paperwork
 

HBS Guy

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The Henri looked nicer, clear ejection, the guy reckons the ammunition didn’t pack enough punch.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
what magnificent machines. I've read heaps where those straight shooting long range guns made a big difference. Henry's were particularly prized, weren't they.?

They are magnificently fit for purpose. Always liked guns. Even as a wee girl child...
I had a nice. single shot .22rifle. Lovely clean lines, simple action. Sold it when the new gun laws came in, couldn’t be stuffed doing the paperwork
I had a simple bolt-action single-shot .22. It was sweet.

Yeah before the Laws on gun ownership changed.
 

DreamRyderX

Active member
The Henry Lever action used during the civil war lacked the wallop for Buffalo hunting, unless you were making a Western with John Wayne in Hollywood.

If you wanted to see an early model realistic Buffalo Rifle, you actually needed to wait 'till the 1870's

Here's one......it was able to pop a massive Buffalo from far out with punch.



Here's another......an actual Buffalo Rifle - 1874 Sharps Rifle:

 

Squire

Active member
Nightmare Ryder xxx appears to profess considerable expertise in the implements of death.
 
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