It aint arf ot mum ... portent of doom as early heat wave temperatures 14 degrees above average

Squire

Active member
It could be a furnace Summer if the early high temperatures continue before the start of Summer.

A big feature of AGW temperature rise is that night temperatures are rising faster than day temperatures which makes the temperature rise less noticeable to the average person. It makes sleeping more difficult for those without aircon.

Nighttime temperature rise will also be more intense in Northern and Southern latitudes of the planet because of longer daylight hours in Summer.




https://au.news.yahoo.com/temperatu...s-southeast-heatwave-continues-103158536.html


'A taste of summer': Temperatures 14 above average this weekend as southeast heatwave continues
Josh Dutton

Fri, 20 November 2020, 5:31 pm

We’re in for a toasty weekend with temperatures soaring past 30 degrees in multiple states with several heatwaves.

The Bureau of Meteorology said “a taste of summer” is on the way with temperatures up to 14C above average across southeastern states this weekend.

Weatherzone meteorologist Joel Pippard told Yahoo News Australia the high temperatures have arrived earlier than usual.

“This is more what you would expect in December, so it’s a couple of weeks early. It’s not hugely unusual, but it is pretty warm for this time of year,” he said.

Adelaide could reach 37C on Saturday and 34 on Sunday while Port Augusta and Woomera could hit a sweltering 42 and 39 on the two days.

Sydney won’t experience the wrath of the heat with tops of 24 and 29 on Saturday and Sunday’s forecast.

However, the city was scorched on Friday. Penrith reached just short of 40 at about 3.22pm. Horsley Park and Richmond each topped 37 at about 2.45pm.

It’s mostly inland NSW areas which will feel the brunt of the heat with Temora, Griffith, Hay and Wentworth all potentially topping 40 on Saturday with high 30s on Sunday. ...
 
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pinkeye

Wonder woman
STILL really hot here. Phew. I have been relying on fans and fluids , and doing sfa, but if the promised storms and cooler temps don't come tomorrow arvo, as they say on the forecasts.. sigh... it's so DRY

I'll think about turning on the air con. I am waiting desperately for this promised wet season.
Some of my trees are dying, because I live in a peculiar spot... the whole of SEQ can be covered in cloud, but there is almost always a break above my area,

It is too common to deny, and I think it has to do with how fast moving storms work around mountains etc.
Yeah it can rain all over the place.. so many times I've been out... that means a long way from home, and coming home through the rain , the closer I get to home, the less it rains, and almost always as I turn into my street, the road shows little or no rain has fallen.
SIGH,

On the other side of that, of course , is the big storms that wreak havoc around SEQ , often do the same thing.

A real life lotto.
 

Squire

Active member
This could be the hottest November in Australia's history.

The big heat is smothering Australia with many towns likely to experience temperatures in the 40s and 50s.

The problem of course is that heating up the centre for a number of days could portend the heat accumulating and spreading East.

https://www.news.com.au/finance/all...s/news-story/514c47afff73a7d7e9a9828d107e0cab

A 4500km conveyor belt of scorching weather stretching from Broome all the way to the country’s south east could prove “dangerous” in the coming days as Australians have yet to acclimatise to the blistering conditions following a wet and cool spring, a climate scientist has warned.

The all-time record for Australia’s hottest ever November day could be broken with the mercury rising close to 50C.
There’s also a possibility the Sydney and Adelaide CBDs could top out at 40C. Sydney’s west is expected to easily get into the 40s on both Saturday and Sunday.
“There’s a big build-up of heat in a belt stretching from Broome to Canberra. Once we get to Thursday that will start to kick in across the south and east and peak on the weekend,” Dr James Goldie from Monash University’s Climate Change Communications Research Hub told news.com.au.
A 4500km conveyor belt of heat is stretching from Broome to Canberra. Picture: BSCH.
 
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