• Please remember that Politics, Off Topic and Global Warming boards are for fairly serious discussion. I would like to see language used in those boards reflect that level of serious discussion. Sand Pit, Members. Improvements—go your hardest.

Greenland Ice Sheet and rising sea levels

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
From early 2003 to mid-2013, the total mass of ice in Greenland declined at a progressively increasing rate. In mid-2013, an abrupt reversal occurred, and very little net ice loss occurred in the next 12–18 months. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and global positioning system (GPS) observations reveal that the spatial patterns of the sustained acceleration and the abrupt deceleration in mass loss are similar. The strongest accelerations tracked the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The negative phase of the NAO enhances summertime warming and insolation while reducing snowfall, especially in west Greenland, driving surface mass balance (SMB) more negative, as illustrated using the regional climate model MAR. The spatial pattern of accelerating mass changes reflects the geography of NAO-driven shifts in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet’s sensitivity to that forcing. We infer that southwest Greenland will become a major future contributor to sea level rise.
Authors: Michael Bevis, Christopher Harig, Shfaqat A. Khan, Abel Brown, Frederik J. Simons, Michael Willis, Xavier Fettweis, Michiel R. van den Broeke, Finn Bo Madsen, Eric Kendrick, Dana J. Caccamise II, Tonie van Dam, Per Knudsen, and Thomas Nylen

https://www.pnas.org/content/116/6/1934
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Record ice loss from Greenland last year—as much as the worst case scenario. This year has seen significant surface loss from melting and sublimation of ice and likely the same again from calving by glaciers at sea level.
 

MilesAway

Bongalong
Record ice loss from Greenland last year—as much as the worst case scenario. This year has seen significant surface loss from melting and sublimation of ice and likely the same again from calving by glaciers at sea level.
Bs, it's all very average!
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
No, DRAH, definitely lot.

The surface mass balance charts from DMI show a deep melt and then there is the calving loss.
 
Top