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Food thread

MilesAway

Bongalong
My dad does an excellent paella. Doesn't add a whole box of stock tho, fills the rest with water because of salt.
Special rice, whatever it is. Apparently rissoto has a different rice.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Yeah, ratio of length to width of grain. Basmati rice the thinnest. I tend to make a risotto when I can get pine mushrooms.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Don’t buy stock from supermarkets, very little flavor, find a specialty grocery store or market stall.

I am so spoiled with the Adelaide Central Market—HUGE range of high quality stuff. Will have to make a lot of pantry items myself in Tassie! I cannot find salami/prosciutto anywhere. When living there will have time to explore much more. Launceston Farmers Market is great—has people from as far as Hobart, 3 hour drive. Need to find a really great shop somewhere.

Want to build a cold smoker there: small shed (the size of an outdoor dunny) with 10' away a firepit, covered trench brings smoke from firepit into smoker, fish/meat hangs from the roof, cold smoke preserves and flavors the meat/fish.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Will also want an offset smoker or a water cooled smoker: cooks and flavors meat/fish/veg.

The offset smoker I have here I will leave here, bit crap and not worth cost of moving it to Tassie.

Also a wood fired pizza oven.
 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
Also a wood fired pizza oven.
Have one built the traditional way using fire rated bricks .... don't buy the cheap metal things from bunnings or some BBQ shop. The taste isn't the same and apart from the size, the metal ones don't retain heat so it's either hot while the fire is on, or it cools down quickly with the fire out. In tassie with it's cold weather it will serve you well if it retains it's heat so you can cook multiple things with one burn .... fresh home made bread and roasts.

My parents used to make 20kg of flours worth of home made bread every few months.... you keep a few loaves fresh and the rest you dry by cutting in half then using the residual heat from the oven to dry it overnight. Keeps for months that way. I like to eat it dry as it's crunchy and it soaks up all th ejuices from whatevere food I'm eating, but otherwise you can wet it with a bit of water to soften it. Tastes nothing like any bread you buy at the supermarket but i grew up with it and love it. I can't get it on the GC so I have my dad send me some from Wollongong a couple of times a year. Even my kids love it.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Yeah, I sort of picture cooking pizzas then putting in a loaf or two of bread. Would the heat last long enough to cook a roast or keep fire going? Have not thought about roasts. Have thought of using it as a tandoori oven so sort of a roast.
 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
Yeah, I sort of picture cooking pizzas then putting in a loaf or two of bread. Would the heat last long enough to cook a roast or keep fire going? Have not thought about roasts. Have thought of using it as a tandoori oven so sort of a roast.

If it's brick, provided you got the heat up hot enough and let it burn for long enough before you add the food, then the heat lasts for hours. Dad used to let it burn hot for about an hour before we then cleaned out the embers (we never cooked with fire still burning), mopped the ash off the base with a wet mop (so the bread wouldn't be covered in ash) and put the bread in. Once the bread was cooked, it'd come out, the loaves were sliced in half (all but 3 or 4 which you kept as fresh bread) then put back in the warm oven and left overnight. If you're not doing a lot of bread you can leave a small fire burning in one corner of the oven like you see them do at pizza shops and use the rest of the oven ... we had to clean it out because we had to fit in a lot of bread in one go ...even after cleaning with a wet mop and cold water it still retained more than enough heat to cook everything.

I want to build one at my place but I'm not allowed until we complete a whole raft of other renovations first. Once I get it I will cook pizzas, bread, roast, pork belly, lasagnas etc in it. I plan to cook for the whole week in one sitting . I think the taste of food cooked with a fire is so much better than conventional ovens
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Absolutely! Meat cooked on a gas barby—not much flavor.

I do intend to get a proper firebrick pizza oven—will be $$$
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
I need to have deep holes drilled into the clay and cement poured in, then beams connecting the piers and a slab on top of that.
 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
I need to have deep holes drilled into the clay and cement poured in, then beams connecting the piers and a slab on top of that.

why? just put it on a floating slab ... if the ground moves, the slab moves with it

otherwise have a metal stand made for it that just sits on the floor, afterall, you won't need a big oven

.. sorta like this



I've even seen similar stands on wheels
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Well, it might work—the slab my little garden shed sits on has not cracked yet. A house size slab—nope.
 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
Well, it might work—the slab my little garden shed sits on has not cracked yet. A house size slab—nope.

My dad had a big one sticking out the back of a shed .. he built one wall of the shed (when I say 'shed' I should point out that it was a fairly elaborate brick shed complete with a seperate bathroom, kitchenette and tiled floor) with the door to the oven inside the shed and the rest of it on the outside... that way he could use it regardless of the weather.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
Have one built the traditional way using fire rated bricks .... don't buy the cheap metal things from bunnings or some BBQ shop. The taste isn't the same and apart from the size, the metal ones don't retain heat so it's either hot while the fire is on, or it cools down quickly with the fire out. In tassie with it's cold weather it will serve you well if it retains it's heat so you can cook multiple things with one burn .... fresh home made bread and roasts.

My parents used to make 20kg of flours worth of home made bread every few months.... you keep a few loaves fresh and the rest you dry by cutting in half then using the residual heat from the oven to dry it overnight. Keeps for months that way. I like to eat it dry as it's crunchy and it soaks up all th ejuices from whatevere food I'm eating, but otherwise you can wet it with a bit of water to soften it. Tastes nothing like any bread you buy at the supermarket but i grew up with it and love it. I can't get it on the GC so I have my dad send me some from Wollongong a couple of times a year. Even my kids love it.
Oh yummo
 
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