• Please remember that Politics, Off Topic and Global Warming boards are for fairly serious discussion. I would like to see language used in those boards reflect that level of serious discussion. Sand Pit, Members. Improvements—go your hardest.

Food thread

pinkeye

Wonder woman
I have native bee hives here.. people tell me they aren't big honey producers, especially now, the blossoms aren't feeding the bees very well. My wee native bees seem to be doing good.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Too cold down here. Might see if any Tas apiarists want to put a couple hives in my little orchard.

Next year think I will buy some decorative shrubs, lilacs, crepe myrtle, depends on the landscape design. Some late winter-early spring flowerers like echium, get bees used to looking in my garden. Some trees blossom very early—have to guard against frosts.
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
I didn't think native bees produced much honey🤔
..like I said.. not big honey producers..... see that prev post..?

These are natural hives.. not something I personally have done. One unusually large one is doing well in a old gouge in an Ironbark. It is a living tree , quite mag actually. The other is smaller, because the tree it lives in was dead, and got snapped off just a short distance up the trunk from the hive... the top is now open to rain so I have placed a slab of the trunk across it to help protect it. That was a couple of years ago, and the wee darlings are still there. Sigh ... the wondes of it all. I'm pretty sure there is at least one other Native Bee nest somewhere.

But they are great pollinators for native plant species.. they do also garner pollen from foreign species. My next door neighbour mentioned the cloud of tiny black bees they'd had hanging around this ( my words ..gross foreign) plant , it is a weed tree IMHO but , but has lots of purple flowers ..

seems my bees liked it.. so I guess that is good, because the plant would have had adequate water, and produce better flowers .. I imagine..

I also have a Hive of wild European honey bees, whch moved in HIGH up in a hollow, and who are competitors to the native bees.
It was an amazing sight.. seeing that swarm move in.. just luck on my part I was sitting looking at everything when I heard this amazing sound.

Can't see how I can remove them...
 
Last edited:

MilesAway

Bongalong
..like I said.. not big honey producers..... see that prev post..?

These are natural hives.. not something I personally have done. One unusually large one is doing well in a old gouge in an Ironbark. It is a living tree , quite mag actually. The other is smaller, because the tree it lives in was dead, and got snapped off just a short distance up the trunk from the hive... the top is now open to rain so I have placed a slab of the trunk across it to help protect it. That was a couple of years ago, and the wee darlings are still there. Sigh ... the wondes of it all. I'm pretty sure there is at least one other Native Bee nest somewhere.

But they are great pollinators for native plant species.. they do also garner pollen from foreign species. My next door neighbour mentioned the cloud of tiny black bees they'd had hanging around this ( my words ..gross foreign) plant , it is a weed tree IMHO but , but has lots of purple flowers ..

seems my bees liked it.. so I guess that is good, because the plant would have had adequate water, and produce better flowers .. I imagine..

I also have a Hive of wild European honey bees, whch moved in HIGH up in a hollow, and who are competitors to the native bees.
It was an amazing sight.. seeing that swarm move in.. just luck on my part I was sitting looking at everything when I heard this amazing sound.

Can't see how I can remove them...
I'll be more careful in the future 🤔🏌🏌🏌🏌🏌
 

johnsmith

Moderator
Staff member
I have native bee hives here.. people tell me they aren't big honey producers, especially now, the blossoms aren't feeding the bees very well. My wee native bees seem to be doing good.

they're not big producers, but their honey attracts a premium price . They're also stingless so having them around isn't a problem
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
they're not big producers, but their honey attracts a premium price . They're also stingless so having them around isn't a problem
I was sitting outside a while back, cooling down , having a cuppa.reading a local paper... . Felt something crawling up my forearm, I could feel the individual feet... Had a look .. it felt different to a spider or ant, so I didn't brush it off.
It was a wee black bee. This one little black bee was just trawling around on my skin. I encouraged it to move off, but it kept circling back. I figured it was after the salt.. on my skin. That was a one-off..:giggle:
 

pinkeye

Wonder woman
Native bee?
That is so,

I wouldn't allow it to wander around on my arm if it was a feral European Honey Bee. There are big differences Monk..

I was actually enchanted. It kept coming back for several minutes,,even tho I'd blow it off with my breath .. it came back.. so I waited until it didn't.

These are very small bees. Black shiny no sting, but they nibble and their little feet cling on to your skin.
Amazing.
 

HBS Guy

Head Honcho
Staff member
Have the bolognese sauce cooking. Pity in a way—lovely weather, sunny, still bit cold but not that bad—and ideal for getting the smoker going!

Wednesday sunny, still and 19°C. So, take ribs and wings out the freezer Tue morning, brine Tue night-Wed morning, buy a bag of charcoal and cut a branch off the apricot tree and cut that in chunks, soak in water overnight, get the smoker going! Some cobs of corn as well.
 
Top